Created By: Prfnoff on June 26, 2013 Last Edited By: Prfnoff on October 16, 2015

Mispronunciation Correction

Someone says a name wrong, and is told how to pronounce it right.

Name Space:
Main
Page Type:
Trope
(The idea is to split this from It Is Pronounced Tro PAY.)

One person mispronounces a person, place or thing's name, and another person (often the one being named) tells them how to pronounce it correctly.

This can come off as Leaning on the Fourth Wall if the audience has only seen the name in print and might have been assuming the incorrect pronunciation. When the pronunciation is nonstandard, this overlaps with It Is Pronounced Tro PAY.

Contrast No Pronunciation Guide. For the inverse of this trope, see My Nayme Is. If the correction is ignored purely to torment the other person, see Malicious Misnaming. When either pronunciation of a word is credible, see You Say Tomato.

Examples:

Advertising
  • An advert in Sweden for Swedish clothes manufacturer Blåkläder (pronounced "Bloh-klay-der") featured an American who consistently mispronounced it as "Black-lah-der". After about 30 seconds of this, a Swedish guy approaches him and says "Say after me: Blåkläder!" The guy responds "That's what I said. Black-lah-der!"
  • In an Isuzu ad, an Asian-American is trying to get a white guy to say 'Isuzu', but the white guy keeps messing up. At the end, the Asian-American says "It's okay. I can't say 'Shiv-o-ray'.
  • In The '70s, there was an air freshener commercial (Glade or Airwick) that made use of this trope. A woman was married to a man named Herb, and she used herbal air fresheners, so the commercial was her constantly correcting her husband on the fact that the hard "H" in "Herb" was not used in "herbal". The commercial ends with her yelling at him that "It's not "HHerbal", it's "'erbal", "'Erb"." He smirks and corrects her: "Herb."

Anime and Manga
  • In Haibane Renmei, one character corrects the fact that Rakka refers to him as Hiyoko, pointing out it's "Hyohko", with exaggerated emphasis on the "oh" sound to make the pronunciation difference clear.
  • In the sixth episode of Panty & Stocking with Garterbelt, Panty reads the title card aloud, mispronouncing it as "Less Diaboliques." Stocking corrects her, and Panty rereads it as "Lay Diaboliques."

Fan Fic

Film (Animated)
  • Monsters, Inc.:
    Randall: Wazowski! Where is the kid, you little one-eyed cretin?
    Mike: Okay, first of all, it's "creetin". If you're gonna threaten me, do it properly. Second of all, you're nuts if you think kidnapping me is going to help you cheat your way to the top.

Film (Live Action)
  • The Breakfast Club. Bender makes a sarcastic quip about being a fan of "Mol-lee-ay". Claire, who seems to like French things, tells him it's "Mol-yair".
  • Done twice in Get Smart:
    • First when Max tries and fails to teach Chief how to pronounce the surname of a Slavic KAOS agent, Ladislav Krstic.
      Max: Kris Kringle, Fish Stick.
    • Then when Chief can't resist calling the President on pronouncing it "nuke-ular".
      Chief: NUCLEAR!
      President: Huh?
      Chief: Sorry, sir.
  • History of the World Part I has Count DeMonet. Peasants and aristocracy alike pronounce his name as "Count Da Money" (as in "he's so rich, that's all he ever does") only to have him redden with frustration and correct the pronunciation to "Dee Moh Nay."
  • In Monty Python and the Holy Grail Arthur and Sir Bedivere start saying "Ni!" to bully an old woman into telling them where they can find a shrubbery. Or at least, Arthur does. Bedivere uses "Nu!" first and Arthur has to walk him through the pronunciation.
  • In Showgirls, Naomi tells Cristal and Jack about her new costume from Versace (spoken as it was an English word, i.e. "Whur-sayz"), with the two of them exchanging knowing looks. Zack later tells Naomi the proper Italian pronounciation, to her embarassment because it shows that she really is a rather uneducated former prostitute instead of the sex goddess she tries to be on stage.

Literature
  • In Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire, Hermione has trouble getting Krum to pronounce her name correctly, telling him it's "Her-my-oh-nee," not "Hermy-own." When he then calls her "Herm-own-ninny," she says it's close enough. Word of God is that this exchange was inserted due to fans mispronouncing her name.
  • In Ender's Game, Ender receives transfer orders to Bonzo's army, and reads his orders aloud. Petra corrects Ender and the reader with the right pronunciation:
    "Not bahn-zoe, pisshead. Bone-So. The name's Spanish. Bonzo Madrid."
  • Ender's Shadow. After several chapters, Sister Carlotta has to correct Graff about the proper pronunciation of Achilles' name. It's not pronounced like the name of the Greek hero (which is an otherwise correct pronunciation), but is instead pronounced, Ah-Sheel. Card corrects the reader a bit late!
  • In Animorphs, the heroes discover that one Mr. DeGroot is looking for Tobias. When Tobias speaks to DeGroot's secretary, he asks for Mr. DeGroot (apparently pronounced as spelled) and is told that it is pronounced as "de-groat".
  • In the first book of the Takeshi Kovacs series, Kovacs corrects someone (and the reader) by specifying that the last name's Slavic origins make it "ko-VACH", not "ko-vax".

Live-Action TV
  • This is almost Wojo's Catch Phrase on Barney Miller—full name Wojciehowicz. He repeatedly insists that "you say it like it's spelled!" when people unfamiliar with Polish inevitably mangle it.
  • In the Bones episode "Mayhem On A Cross", Dr Brennan corrects the pronunciation of the band named Skalle several times.
  • In Game of Thrones, Danaerys visits the city state of Qarth, which she pronounces as "Quarth", and sort of acts like she owns the place. She is corrected by a snooty member of its leadership that the place's name is pronounced "Karth". This correction is also for the benefit of the audience, since the original book series had No Pronunciation Guide.
  • A Running Gag used in the police drama Ohara involved a visiting lawman arriving at the precinct station seeking "detective O'Hara" and expecting a burly Irish Cop. The detective would simply intone "Ohara," and the visitor would rerail his thinking.
  • Our Show, an ITV Saturday-morning show from the late 1970s presented by children, has a Hilarious Outtake of a little girl of perhaps ten or eleven who was innocent of the subtleties of French pronunciation. Given a link to do concerning the afternoon's sporting attractions, she read off the autocue:
    Little Girl: And this afternoon at two, we go to Murray Walker who will commentate on the Grand Pricks of South Africa..
    Producer: I think you'll find it's pronounced "Grond Pree"...
    Little Girl (after a second's consideration): Well, it says "Grand Pricks" here!
  • Parodied in the Richard E. Grant version of The Scarlet Pimpernel. The titular character repeatedly and deliberately pronounces Chauvelin's name "Chavelon", and is wearily corrected each time.
  • Defied during one of Les Nessman's sports reports broadcast on WKRP in Cincinnati. Les reports the standings of a golf tournament, where he encounters the competitor Chi Chi Rodriguez, and pronounces it as though it rhymes with "Pie Pie Nod-pig-Suez." Johnny Caravella whispers the correct pronunciation to Les, who ignores it completely, and continues mangling the poor golfer's name on the air.

Theatre
  • In "The Three B's" from On Your Toes, Junior, testing his classical music students, plays a theme from César Franck's Symphony in D minor. When a student identifies the composer's name, Junior has to point out that it's pronounced "Fronck."
  • In Carousel, when Carrie calls Julie "as silent as an old Sahaira Spink," Julie tries to correct her pronunciation of the last word, but Carrie doesn't accept the correction:
    Julie: Spinx.
    Carrie: Uh-uh. Spink.
    Julie: Y'spell it with an "x."
    Carrie: That's only when there's more than one.
  • The Rose Tattoo:
    Jack (after an awkward pause): Mrs. Delle Rose...
    Serafina (correcting his pronunciation): Delle Rose!

Western Animation
  • In Arthur, Prunella is a big Henry Skeevernote  fan and knows everything in all the books - but she, along with everyone else her age, mispronounces Henry's friend's name as "PURSE-a-fone." Mr. Ratburn, who happens to walk by as she says it, corrects her to "Per-SE-feh-nee." He knows nothing about the books, he just knows how one correctly pronounces Persephone.
  • In Superman: The Animated Series, when Superman mispronounces Mr. Mxyzptlk's name as "Mix-ill-plick", Mxyzptlk uses helpful visual aids to demonstrate that the correct pronunciation is "Mix-yes-spit-lick." The "Mix-ill-plick" pronunciation was an intentional Call Back to Superfriends, which is how Mxy's name was pronounced for that series' entire lifespan.
  • In one episode of Spongebob Squarepants, a mailman mispronounces the reading "Tentacles" as "Tennisballs" and Squidward angrily corrects him. Then Patrick mispronounced it as "Tadpoles" and Squidward says that it's "Tennisballs... I mean Tentacles!" And at the end of the episode, his name is written on a trophy as "Squidward Tortellini".
Community Feedback Replies: 58
  • June 26, 2013
    Bisected8
  • June 26, 2013
    UltramarineAlizarin
    So should we be looking to harvest examples from the page-to-be-split? Like this one:

    [[folder:Films -- Live-Action]]
    • For the first third or so of Mel Brooks's Young Frankenstein, Frederick Frankenstein consistently corrects people's pronounciation of his surname: "Fraun-kon-shteen." This causes his assistant Igor to insist on "Eye-gor", and calling him "Froderick" instead of Frederick. Ultimately Frankenstein accepts the traditional way of pronouncing his name when he takes up the family trade.

    EDIT: This one too (rewritten some):

    [[folder:Films -- Animation]]
  • June 26, 2013
    xanderiskander
    Just to be clear what makes this different from Insistent Terminology? Currently it sounds like the same thing except it's for names.

    ^ Those examples actually should stay on It Is Pronounced Tro PAY. Because it's the character with the name that pronounces it in a fancy way (and that's what the trope is supposed to be about). Ralph in that example pronounced his name the way it's supposed to be pronounced.
  • June 27, 2013
    Prfnoff
    @xanderiskander: If you're saying this is just The Same But More Specific of Insistent Terminology, the same could also be said of They Call Me Mister Tibbs and I Am Not Weasel. Actually, as I see it, Insistent Terminology usually involves people telling others to call themselves or something or someone else by a completely different name, often a euphemistic one.
  • June 27, 2013
    Duncan
    I think this is the same thing as another current YKTTW: In Universe Pronunciation Guide [1]
  • June 27, 2013
    Prfnoff
    @Duncan: Yes, and I should have remembered that YKTTW, since I posted in it. This has a better title and a tighter definition, though. I've copied over the examples that seem to fit.
  • June 27, 2013
    reub2000
    • In Bones episode "Mayhem On A Cross", Dr Brennan corrects the pronunciation of the band named Skalle several times.
  • June 27, 2013
    oneuglybunny
    Live Action TV
    • Defied during one of Les Nessman's sports reports broadcast on WKRP In Cincinnati. Les reports the standings of a golf tournament, where he encounters the competitor Chi Chi Rodriguez, and pronounces it as though it rhymes with "Pie Pie Nod-pig-Suez." Johnny Caravella whispers the correct pronunciation to Les, who ignores it completely, and continues mangling the poor golfer's name on the air.
  • June 28, 2013
    MrRuano
    • The Tick plays with this when the Tick messes with the alien Thrakkorzog by repeatedly mispronouncing his name, ending with Susan.

    • Jo Jos Bizarre Adventure Abridged has jotaro play with this when facing Kakyoin by mispronouncing the name of Kakyoin's stand, Hierophant Green. Kakyoin eventually notices that Jotaro's just mispronouncing the name to mess with him.
  • June 28, 2013
    randomsurfer
    Question: why does it have to be a name? See my Unhappily Ever After example on the "In Universe Pronunciation Guide" ykttw. (Shorter: There are two ways to pronounce "forte," depending on what you mean by it.)

    Played with in an episode of King Of The Hill where Hank tries to correct Rad Thibodeaux on the pronounciation of his own name: Rad pronounces it "Thih-buh-DAY-ocks" instead of "TIH-bah-doh" which is the usual pronunciation.
  • July 1, 2013
    eowynjedi
    • This is almost Wojo's Catch Phrase on Barney Miller--full name Wojciehowicz. He repeatedly insists that "you say it like it's spelled!" when people unfamiliar with Polish inevitably mangle it.
  • July 6, 2013
    StarSword
    Film:
    • In Monty Python And The Holy Grail Arthur and Sir Bedivere start saying "Ni!" to bully an old woman into telling them where they can find a shrubbery. Or at least, Arthur does. Bedivere uses "Nu!" first and Arthur has to walk him through the pronunciation.
    • Done twice in Get Smart:
      • First when Max tries and fails to teach Chief how to pronounce the surname of a Slavic KAOS agent, Ladislav Krstic.
        Max: Kris Kringle, Fish Stick.
      • Then when Chief can't resist calling the President on pronouncing it "nuke-ular".
        Chief: NUCLEAR!
        President: Huh?
        Chief: Sorry, sir.
  • July 12, 2013
    69BookWorM69
    Literature:
    • In Aunt Dimity and the Lost Prince, Lori and Bree are informed by Frances Wylton that Lord and Lady Boghwell's surname is pronounced "buffel", and Dimity reminds Lori to be sure to say it correctly before she goes to visit them. This is important because the Boghwells are snobbish aristocrats.
  • July 12, 2013
    randomsurfer
    In a sketch on Saturday Night Live Nicolas Cage is a man who is talking with his pregnant wife about possible names for the baby, and he shoots all her suggestions down because they're too easy to change into insults. ("Oh, right. Sure. Peter. Let's just put him up for adoption right now, save the kid a lot of agony. I mean, obviously - no Peter, no Dick, no Rod! Can we just discuss this intelligently, please?") At the end of the sketch he gets a telegram.
    Telegram Deliverer: I've got a telegram here for a Mr. & Mrs. Asswipe Johnson. I'm supposed to read it. holds telegram "Dear Asswipe & Emily: Congratulations on your upcoming blessed event. All our love, Bob & Diane." Here you go, Sir. hands him the telegram
    Husband: Uh.. listen.. that's "Os-wee-pay".
    Telegram Deliverer: confused What?
    Husband: Uh.. forget it, forget it.
  • July 28, 2013
    69BookWorM69
    Is the OP still updating this? The examples submitted in comments haven't been added.
  • July 28, 2013
    DAN004
    ^ Take over plz.
  • July 28, 2013
    StarSword
    This becomes Up For Grabs on August 27.
  • July 28, 2013
    Chabal2
    Hogfather: Jonathan Teatime, who insists his name is pronounced Teh-ah-tim-eh.
  • July 29, 2013
    DAN004
    @ Star Sword: How exactly?
  • July 29, 2013
    DAN004
    BTW does this count?
    • In one episode of Spongebob Squarepants, a mailman mispronounces the reading "Tentacles" as "Tennisballs" and Squidward angrily corrects him. Then Patrick mispronounced it as "Tadpoles" and Squidward says that it's "Tennisballs... I mean Tentacles!" And at the end of the episode, his name is written on a trophy as "Squidward Tortellini".
  • July 29, 2013
    69BookWorM69
    @ DAN004 and StarSword If it's due to be officially Up For Grabs in the near future, I'll give the OP a bit longer. The OP might have a dodgy/geriatric computer (as I do) or some real life issues to cope with.

    Besides, I have two YKTTWs with crowners going now, as well as other YKTTWs and some updates for the Aunt Dimity page that I'm also working on.
  • July 29, 2013
    StarSword
    @DAN 004: From the Up For Grabs page, YKTTW drafts automatically lapse into Up For Grabs territory after two months of inactivity from the sponsor. Last time Prfnoff showed up was June 27 according to the edit log (the book icon at the top of the draft).
  • August 5, 2013
    69BookWorM69
    ^ Is it possible to drop a note to the OP and ask if they want to give it up early? Otherwise, I'll wait for the regular two-month period to pass.
  • August 5, 2013
    yisfidri
    Live Action TV:
    • Parodied in the Richard E Grant version of The Scarlet Pimpernel. The titular character repeatedly and deliberately pronounces Chauvelin's name "Chavelon", and is wearily corrected each time.
  • August 6, 2013
    Arivne
    ^^ You can send a PM (Private Message) to Prfnoff by going here.

    It's where the "pm" button (at the top of trope and works pages) takes you.
  • August 6, 2013
    Surenity
  • August 13, 2013
    69BookWorM69
    I sent the OP a PM about this; Prfnoff will get back to this shortly,
  • April 19, 2014
    justanotherrandomlurker
    Accidental Misnaming (which should never have been renamed from My Name Is Not Durwood - that was the Trope Namer)

    Malicious Misnaming

    It Is Pronounced Tro PAY

    Malaproper

    Misheard Malaproper

    Matter of fact, this is covered by Accidental Misnaming, a lot of the examples listed should go there.
  • April 19, 2014
    Prfnoff
    @justanotherrandomlurker: You're wrong to say that Accidental Misnaming covers this exactly. You're also wrong to say that it "should never have been renamed."
  • April 19, 2014
    justanotherrandomlurker
    How is this any different from Accidental Misnaming?
  • April 19, 2014
    BaffleBlend
    I don't like this. It's Its Pronounced Tro Pay, but with people's names. I see no reason for a page split.
  • April 19, 2014
    StarSword
    ^More like a supertrope to that. It Is Pronounced Tro PAY is when the corrected pronunciation is insisted on because it sounds more like a rich person's name. E.g. in Keeping Up Appearances, Hyacinthe Bucket insists that her last name is "Bouquet".
  • April 19, 2014
    DAN004
    I disagree that this is a subtrope to that Tro Pay since this also covers a guy with a Hard-to-pronounce name gives a handy clue, like in that Mik-yez-spit-lick example.

    Contrast No Pronunciation Guide and Some Call Me Tim.
  • April 19, 2014
    ShanghaiSlave
    justanotherrandomlurker

    The difference between calling Sake(Sa-keh) Water—incorrect, therefore misnaming— and calling Sake Sayk—correct, but wrong pronunciation.

    Its Pronounced Tro PAY is a gag and actually unrelated. unless someone named Jose (Ho-seh) insist people pronounce his name as Joe-SAY, that would be tropay.

    This one is about correcting people who mispronounce something, which is kinda People Sit On Chairs in my book. so this is instead covered by No Pronunciation Guide.
  • April 19, 2014
    StarSword
    @DAN 004: Sorry, I guess I wasn't clear. I meant that this trope is a supertrope to Tro PAY.

    @Shanghai Slave: No Pronunciation Guide is when a word is pronounced differently by different characters without any one pronunciation being established as correct. Ref: the various ways "Goa'uld" gets pronounced in Stargate SG 1, and some characters calling Qara from Neverwinter Nights 2 "KAR-uh", while others call her "KWAR-uh".
  • November 3, 2014
    DAN004
    ^^ more like this is when there IS a pronounciation guide.

    Does it have to be limited to names, though? E.g someone correcting a non-english speaker's mangled english words.
  • November 4, 2014
    Chernoskill
    Film

    • In Showgirls, Naomi tells Cristal and Jack about her new costume from Versace (spoken as it was an English word, i.e. "Whur-sayz"), with the two of them exchanging knowing looks. Zack later tells Naomi the proper Italian pronounciation, to her embarassment because it shows that she really is a rather uneducated former prostitute instead of the sex goddess she tries to be on stage.
  • November 4, 2014
    Alvin
    Two more possibles in Advertising? I forgot what the ad was for, but a guy tries to get a job and keeps saying things like what a good dumbass employee he'll make for the dumbass company. The employer, who has a nameplate on his desk "Mr. Dumass", says "It's pronounced "'do-moss'". Another one is an Isuzu ad from years ago where an Asian-American is trying to get a white guy to say 'Isuzu', but the white guy keeps messing up. At the end, the Asian-American says "It's okay. I can't say 'Shiv-o-ray'.

    Edited to add: The first one is in Its Pronounced Tro PAY .
  • November 4, 2014
    StarSword
    Got one from one of my fanfics, which I need to write a page for.

    Fan Works:
  • November 5, 2014
    Skylite
    Regarding the Superman Animated example above: the "Mixel-plick" pronunciation was an intentional Call Back to Super Friends, which is how Mxy's name was pronounced for that series' entire lifespan.

    • Film History Of The World Part One has Count De Monet. Peasants and aristocracy alike pronounce his name as "Count Da Money" (as in "he's so rich, that's all he ever does") only to have him redden with frustration and correct the pronunciation to "Dee Moh Nay."
    • Advertising In The Seventies, there was an air freshener commercial (Glade or Airwick) that made use of this trope. A woman was married to a man named Herb, and she used herbal air fresheners, so the commercial was her constantly correcting her husband on the fact that the hard "H" in "Herb" was not used in "herbal". The commercial ends with her yelling at him that "It's not "HHerbal", it's "'erbal", "'Erb"." He smirks and corrects her: "Herb."

  • November 10, 2014
    snowviolet
    {{Films:}}
    • Film//The Breakfast Club. Bender makes a sarcastic quip about being a fan of "Mol-lee-ay". Claire, who seems to like French things, tells him it's "Mol-yair".
  • November 10, 2014
    oneuglybunny
    Live Action TV
    • A Running Gag used in the police drama Ohara involved a visiting lawman arriving at the precinct station seeking "detective O'Hara" and expecting a burly Irish Cop. The late Pat Morita would simply intone "Ohara" with the stress on the second syllable, and the visitor would rerail his thinking.
  • November 11, 2014
    SvartiKotturinn
    Exaggerated in Friends: Phoebe tries to teach Joey French for a role he wants to audition for. He speaks complete and utter gibberish, no matter how many times Phoebe corrects him, and is unable to hear the difference between what he pronounces and actual French.
  • November 11, 2014
    AgProv
    Never Workwith Children Or Animals:
    • The little girl of perhaps ten or eleven, on a Saturday morning zoo show, who was innocent of the subtleties of French pronunciation. Given a link to do concerning the afternoon's sporting attractions, she read off the autocue
      And this afternoon at two, we go to Murray Walker who will commentate on the Grand Pricks of South Africa..
      (Producer) I think you'll find it's pronounced "Grond Pree"...
      (Little Girl, after a second's consideration) Well, it says "Grand Pricks" here!
  • November 11, 2014
    Atreides
    I'm too lazy to flesh this out right now, but Mike from Monsters Inc corrects Randall over his pronunciation of "cretin".
  • November 11, 2014
    mr.whim
    It seems like this might be better served as simply being a trope for when a character inadvertently mispronounces a word for comedic effect. Whether a character corrects them seems incidental and would just be an aspect of the trope. It Is Pronounced Tro PAY seems like it's only done deliberately to seem fancy, or to obscure an otherwise undignified word.

    This would include things like Nuclear(/Nucular), Chopin(Sho-PAN/Chop-in), Quiche(Keesh/Quicky), where the character just doesn't know how it's pronounced, so they take a wild stab in the dark. (Which It Is Pronounced Tro PAY has examples of on its page, contrary to the description.)
  • November 11, 2014
    Prfnoff
    @mr.whim: No, that would be broadening it too far. In-character acknowledgment is more than just an incidental aspect of many dialogue tropes (e.g. Lame Pun Reaction), and I don't think "comedic effect" is enough of a stipulation to raise the tropeworthiness of inadvertent mispronunciation by itself above People Sit On Chairs. I'm also worried about tropers coming from all sorts of different communities bringing in natter and edit wars when they can't agree on how a proper name or other word is supposed to be pronounced.

    @AgProv: Examples should be from media, not just anecdotes.
  • November 12, 2014
    AgProv
    ^You'll find this clip on many a blooper reel, which makes it more than an anecdote and an example of live-Action TV. I'm not sure what the show was; it was one of those late 1970's Saturday-morning zoo-format magazine things for kids. In context it was BBC, and "Saturday Morning Swap Shop" comes to mind as a possibility - the BBC had rights to Formula One at the time and the excitable Murray Walker was its chief commentator and anchorman. Apparently the child who made the error went on, some years later, to become an actress in TV shows in her own right....
  • November 12, 2014
    eroock
    Do we need a cross-over of It Is Pronounced Tro PAY and Insistent Terminology? I think not.
  • November 12, 2014
    DAN004
    ^ no, this trope is only tangentially related to those. The thing that is being corrected does NOT have to be a person's name.
  • November 12, 2014
    eroock
  • November 12, 2014
    StarSword
    ^This is a supertrope to Its Pronounced Tro PAY. Its Pronounced Tro PAY is the subtrope for when the person doing the correcting is trying to fancy it up by pronouncing it differently, e.g. Hyacinthe Bucket from Keeping Up Appearances insisting her surname is "Bouquet" like it's French because she has inferiority issues.

    Whereas in the Get Smart example, the correct pronunciation is, in fact, "new-clee-ar", not "nuke-u-lar".
  • November 12, 2014
    DAN004
    Here, it's "correcting" in the truest sense of correcting, i.e righting actual wrongs. IIPTP is correcting "wrongs" that only someone would object to. Basically, a crossover of this and Insistent Terminology.

    Terminology and pronunciation are two different things, too.
  • December 10, 2014
    randomsurfer
    • The Simpsons: when Krusty the Clown gets arrested for tax evasion, live on-air Kent Brockman says "avoision." Then he gets into an argument with the offstage crew. "I don't say evasion, I say avoision!"
  • December 10, 2014
    SvartiKotturinn
    Israeli satire show Eretz Nehederet once ran a series of skits during an election season, in the format of political advertisements for fictional parties. One of the skits was for a party that advocated legalising punching people who pronounce their own name pretentiously and correct other people when they pronounce it normally (e.g. pronouncing the name 'Adam' as 'uh-DAHM', the 'fancier' way of pronouncing the namenote , and the name 'Arik', short for the Hebrew male first names 'Arye' or 'Ariel', as 'Eric').
  • October 15, 2015
    randomsurfer
    • NYPD Blue: When Sipowicz goes in for a prostate exam, afterwards he talks about it and consistently calls it "prostratenote " PAA John Irvin passive-aggressively asks "Have I been pronouncing it wrong the whole time?" and then later leaves a dictionary on Sipowicz's desk open to the word prostate. A season or so later it comes up again and Sipowicz continues to pronounce it prostrate.
    • In the last episode of The Steven Banks Show Steven tries to explain to a Know Nothing Know It All that Bill Mumy's last name is pronounced "moo-mee" but the KNKIA insists that it's pronounced "mummy."
  • October 16, 2015
    GiorgioDaneri
    Live action TV

  • October 16, 2015
    DAN004
    ^ That makes me thinking that we can mine Alternate Character Reading for examples.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/discussion.php?id=3h9saso6guw1xzc7kiyr7qtx