Created By: EdnaWalker on April 26, 2013 Last Edited By: EdnaWalker on April 17, 2016
Nuked

Nonhumanly Named Human

Human character with a name not typically given to humans that is given by a human source.

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Page Type:
Trope
Usually, a human character in a work of fiction is given a "human" name, like Alice or Bob. "Human" names are names that are typically given to humans in a given human culture. If they have a name that isn't a "human" name, it's most likely their nickname.

There's some Values Dissonance involved regarding what makes a good name. Names can surge in popularity, fall out of favor or change context with the times. And different cultures have wildly different choices on what makes a good name.

However, there are human characters in fictional works, especially animated works and comics, that have a given name not typically given to humans that come from a human source. An example of this is a human given an object, word, or personality name, a name that is a common word for a given object, a name based on a character's personality, or a name that is a common noun or other standard word. Another example is a human given a name more commonly given to pets or animals, like Spot, Rover, Patches, Fluffy, Flipper, Tama, Pochi, or Mittens. The name doesn't have to be an Unfortunate Name or Embarrassing First Name.

Sometimes, the atypical-for-a-human word, personality, or object given name happens to look or sound close to a typical "human" given name. Examples of this include Bridge instead of Bridget, Sofa instead of Sofia/Sophia, Gorge instead of George, Hands instead of Hans, Gym instead of Jim/Jem, and Seven instead of Sven.

Sometimes, a word in a given language is not a typical "human" name, but the same word in another language is a typical "human" given name. For example, the English word, "Star" is not a typical "human" name, but the Latin word, "Stella" and the Japanese word, "Hoshi" are. Also, the English word, "Seven" is not typical as a "human" name, but the same word in Japanese, "Nana" is.

The name is a real word (unlike Aerith and Bob) but you won't expect a human to be named as such. Some common word names, like Grace, Page (alternate spelling of Paige), Hunter, Willow, Forest (alternate spelling of Forrest), Peg, Dot (short for Dorothy), and Rock are typical "human" given games, but Stoic, Moon, Rainbow, Lamp, and Cinderblock are not.

Sometimes, humans can give themselves "non-human" names.

The "non-human" name is given by a human, so this deals with the audience's perspective of what counts as a "non-human" name. Unlike Who Names Their Kid "Dude"?, this deals with a decidedly non-human style name that is accepted in its own universe. This is neither Stellar Name, which are human names about space-y things, nor is it Floral Theme Naming, which are flowers used as human names. This is not Name From Another Species, which is a human or other species character given a name that comes from a species other than their given species.

The trope examples have to be human, even if the human in question is artificial.

Overlaps with Unfortunate Name and Aerith and Bob. Compare and Contrast Who Names Their Kid "Dude"?. Sometimes goes hand-in-hand with Theme Naming.

Examples

Anime and Manga
  • Jojos Bizarre Adventure, being chock-full of characters named after songs and bands, has this trope in spades, with names like Oyecomova or a US President named Funny Valentine, together with Edible Theme Naming when it comes to Part 5.

Film: Animated
  • Hiccup from How to Train Your Dragon is an example. He points out how ridiculous his name is, but explains the reasons for awful names (scaring off gnomes and trolls) and says that there are other people with worse ones. Other examples include Stoick, Fishlegs, Ruffnut and Tuffnut, Gobber, Snotlout, and Spitelout.
  • In the 2012 adaptation of The Lorax, the Once-ler's name actually is Once-ler. This is in contrast to the original, where Once-ler is hinted to be more of a title/nickname than anything. In the film, the non-human style name just shows how he is the Un Favorite.

Literature
  • The Graveyard Book. One of the main characters is a man named Nobody.
  • In the Garrett, P.I. series novel Dread Brass Shadows, one of the people searching for the magic book is a rich human nutcase named Fido. Garrett snarks about how nobody even names their dog "Fido" anymore.
  • The protagonists of the Mirrorscape series are named Mel, Ludo and Wren, and other major characters include Groot, Ambrosius Blenk and Dirk Tot. Mel's name is a "human" name, but the other five characters' names are of this vein.
  • The Outsiders. Brothers Ponyboy and Sodapop Curtis each have decidedly non-human style names. The former notes that he likes his name, but has come to expect weird reactions.
    Cherry: That's an original and lovely name.
    Ponyboy: My dad was an original person.
    • The latter notes that it "even says so on his birth certificate."

Live Action TV

Music
  • The protagonist of Melanie Martinez's Concept Album "Cry Baby" is implied to be literally named that. According to the music video to the song "Cry Baby" she was named that by her older brother after her birth.

Newspaper Comics
  • Rerun Van Pelt of Peanuts has a name of this vein, unlike the other kids in the series. Rerun got his name because when Lucy compared having a second brother to television reruns, Linus thought "Rerun" would be a perfect name for him.

Western Animation
  • The Powerpuff Girls
    • The title characters Blossom, Bubbles, and Buttercup have names like this as a part of Alphabetical Theme Naming.
    • Two of the Rowdyruff Boys, Brick and Boomer, count as this, but Butch averts this as his name is a "human" name.
  • Popeye
    • The title character has a name in this vein.
    • His nephews, Pipeye, Pupeye, Peepeye, and Poopeye also have names in this vein, as does Swea Pea. Swea Pea's real name is Scooner, which is also an atypical name for a human.
  • The Flintstones. Pebbles and Bamm Bamm have names of this vein even though Fred and Wilma Flintstone (Pebbles' parents) and Barney and Betty Rubble (Bamm Bamm's adopted parents) have typical human names.
  • Futurama.
    "I'm Scruffy... the janitor."
  • Drawn Together.
    • Bleh, Princess Clara's cousin has a name that is in this vein.
    • Toot Braunstein has a name in this vein, unlike the character of whom she is a Captain Ersatz of, Betty Boop.

Real Life
Community Feedback Replies: 114
  • April 26, 2013
    aurora369
    Brand-Shei from Skyrim is an elf with an Argonian (reptile man) name, since he was raised by Argonians.
  • April 26, 2013
    Mauri
    • Real Life:
      • In many countries we get as in Who names their kid dude for places were naming after celebrities or common items isn't against the law or is ignored and a popular sport. This however keeps a few famous cases in El Salvador where you can still meet people with the names: Rayovac Martinez (Rayovac is a brand for batteries), Circuncision (circumcision or the operation name on the male genitalia), Onedollar, Usnavy or Yusnavy (U. S. Navy), Blakandeker (Black & Decker), and Osteraiser (Osterizer). The list goes longer so cutting it here.
  • April 26, 2013
    DennisDunjinman
    There's some Values Dissonance involved regarding what makes a good name. Names can surge in popularity, fall out of favor or change context with the times. And different races have wildly different choices on what makes a good name. See You Are The Translated Foreign Word.

    Other than that, while I don't have specific examples, I have a feeling this happens quite often in action-oriented anime where people are theme-named a lot of silly things that no Japanese parent would be allowed to put on a birth certificate.

    By the way, the title as it stands now sounds like the human was adopted by extraterrestrials. I wonder if the inverse is a trope; aliens with unlikely human names, the same way they inexplicably speak Earth languages with fluency.
  • April 26, 2013
    johnnycache
    Played with in the first episode of Mork And Mindy. Mork was watching Earth television and commented: "I like that boy Opie. (beat) But what is an Earth child doing with a Martian name?"
  • April 26, 2013
    ohnoesazombie
  • April 26, 2013
    justanotherrandomlurker
    I'm trying to think, because I seem to remember a really trippy movie where one of the character's names was "Dog"... even he found his name of unusual, but apparently, he didn't have really good parents.
  • April 26, 2013
    xanderiskander
    What's the difference between this and Theme Naming? The powerpuff example is the alphabetical variant, and Popeye and his daughter sound like the food variant.
  • April 26, 2013
    MonaNaito
    My main concern is that this will end up becoming "list of character names that someone thought sounded kinda strange." People will hear a character name and think "Wow, that's weird, I've never heard of a person named that before" and it will end up here.
  • April 26, 2013
    SharleeD
    ^ Maybe this would work better if it's limited to cases when it's lampshaded, in that somebody -- maybe the one with the weird name, maybe someone else -- comments on its oddness in-universe.

    • In Dread Brass Shadows, one of the people searching for the magic book is a rich human nutcase named Fido. Garrett snarks about how nobody even names their dog "Fido" anymore.
  • April 27, 2013
    MonaNaito
    ^^ That would certainly fix the problem, but then it becomes even more similar to Who Names Their Kid Dude.
  • May 14, 2013
    EdnaWalker
    This trope is supposed to be like the YKTTW DefinitelyNonHumanName, but applied to a human character.
  • May 15, 2013
    1810072342
    Literature: The protagonists of the Mirrorscape series are named Mel, Ludo and Wren, and other major characters include Groot, Ambrosius Blenk and Dirk Tot.
  • May 31, 2013
    Arivne
    Live Action TV
    • Star Trek
      • Star Trek The Next Generation episode "Suddenly Human". In the Back Story the Talarians wiped out a Federation colony and took one prisoner - a 3 1/2 year old boy. He was adopted by a Talarian ship captain and given the name Jono.
      • Star Trek Voyager. A six year old human girl was captured by the Borg and assimilated. They gave her the name Seven of Nine.
  • May 31, 2013
    TrueShadow1
    Does the Snow White example even count? They're dwarves, not humans...

    Besides, how to distinguish a "human" name and a "non-human" name, especially if the story takes place in another world, where the normal naming conventions are different from ours?
  • May 31, 2013
    Larkmarn
    The Powerpuff Girls were born in a vat of chemicals fully formed and six years old. They can fly, shoot lasers, and have super strength. How are they human again?

    Regardless... I don't see this as distinct from Who Names Their Kid Dude.
  • May 31, 2013
    EdnaWalker
    How do I make this trope distinct from Who Names Their Kid Dude?
  • May 31, 2013
    oneuglybunny
    ^ The best way to differentiate this concept from that of Who Names Their Kid Dude, and also allay concerns that examples will become mired in YMMV subjective morass, is to stipulate that the name must come from a non-human source, such as an alien or a monster or a ghost. This way, the human character has a reason for bizarre nomenclature. One possible exception might be allowed for those characters who name themselves. One real life example being champion alpine skier Picabo Street: she named herself after her favorite childhood game.
  • May 31, 2013
    EdnaWalker
  • May 31, 2013
    xanderiskander
    Anime and Manga
    • Mushishi: It's revealed that the protagonist got his name "Ginko" when he was swallowed by a mushi called Takoyami that stole his memories. To escape from the Takoyami he had to remember a name, but since he couldn't remember his own he named himself after a mushi called Ginko that lives within the Takoyami. After he escaped his new name was the only thing he could remember about himself.
  • May 31, 2013
    randomsurfer
    • In Priest-Kings of Gor Tarl* meets an synthisized human and his clone, named Mul Al-ka and Mul Ba-ta. "Mul" is a word for a person who is a slave of the Priest-Kings, and "Al-ka" & "Ba-ta" are the first two letters of the Gorean alphabet. They're basically named "Slave A" and "Slave B." No one except the Priest-King who made them knows which is synthisized and which the clone.

    *Tarl himself isn't an example; on Gor it's a reasonably common name, although when he was growing up in Bristol he got into more than his share of fights over kids teasing him about his weird name.
  • July 15, 2013
    paycheckgurl
  • July 15, 2013
    FrodoGoofballCoTV
    Film - Live Action
    • Lampshaded for laughs in Indiana Jones And The Last Crusade:
      Sallah: Please, what does it always mean, this... this "Junior"?
      Professor Henry Jones: That's his name. [points to himself] Henry Jones... [points to Indy] ...Junior.
      Indiana Jones: I like "Indiana."
      Professor Henry Jones: We named the dog Indiana.
      Marcus Brody: May we go home now, please?
      Sallah: The dog? [starts laughing] You are named after the dog?
      Indiana Jones: I've got a lot of fond memories of that dog.
  • July 16, 2013
    DAN004
    Define "human name" and "non-human name".
  • July 16, 2013
    StarSword
    ^I'd go with "Name from human language" versus "name from nonhuman language".
  • July 16, 2013
    EdnaWalker
    I was thinking more along the lines of a human character given a name not normally given to humans, but the name still came from a human source. Could that be a different trope from this YKTTW, which is a human character given a name not normally given to humans from a non-human source?
  • July 16, 2013
    DAN004
    ^ Example?
  • July 16, 2013
    nitrokitty
    • Carrot Ironfoundersson of Discworld was raised by dwarves, hence his dwarven name of Kzad-bhat, which, roughly translated, means "Head Banger".
  • July 16, 2013
    EdnaWalker
    @DAN 004: Here are two examples of human characters with names not normally given to humans, but that came from a human source.
  • July 17, 2013
    DAN004
    "human characters with names not normally given to humans, but that came from a human source."

    That... sounds really specific. o_O

    By the way, what counts as "nonhuman" name depends on the work (see Aerith And Bob) but I guess this deals with the audience's perspective of what counts as a "nonhuman" name?
  • August 5, 2013
    SharleeD
    Why not just "Person Named For Pet Or Thing"? That seems to be what it's shaping up to be, and avoids the ambiguity of humans merely having a name from a non-human species' culture.
  • August 5, 2013
    lakingsif
    Some of the Jedi from Star Wars, e.g. Obi-Wan Kenobi, Qui-Gon Jinn, Mace Windu: they're all humans. Don't kill me, but is Ahsoka human-named?

    Mowgli of The Jungle Book.

    Also, Who Names Their Kid Dude is more about the ridiculous naming trends that are real human names, but only for kids with evil/ stupid parents. What you're going for here sounds more like a decidedly non-human style name that is accepted in its own universe, whereas with Who Names Their Kid Dude the usually more embarrassing than absurd name is not accepted in its own universe. Like those Chinese people who tried to call their kid 'hashtag' and '@' (WNTKD), but calling your kid 'Iolo' (YOLO!) in Wales where it's a nice lads' name (this trope).
  • August 11, 2013
    lakingsif
    For a title, how about an example, like "Faeb-Nav Uoeloefo The Human" (as in 'Finn The Human' off Adventure Time.
  • August 11, 2013
    IAmATropist
    Oops, this was a case of Square Peg Round Trope.
  • August 11, 2013
    lakingsif
    ^ Who Names Their Kid Dude, they're human words and not accepted in their own world.
  • August 11, 2013
    IAmATropist
    ^^^ I'm pretty sure you just made that up, a better example name for the trope would be Hiccup Horrendous III.
  • August 11, 2013
    lakingsif
    ^ Yep, but it's explanatory. Hiccup Horrendous III The Human also is. And alliterative.
  • August 11, 2013
    EdnaWalker
    Could it just be Hiccup The Human? If that doesn't work, do you think you can think of a good name for this trope that doesn't have a Trope Namer?
  • August 12, 2013
    lakingsif
    Name From Another World?

    Oh, you might like to mention that this is also not Stellar Name: that's human names about space-y things.
  • August 12, 2013
    DAN004
    BTW... I guess I've seen a YKTTW with similar style already. :P
  • September 20, 2013
    DAN004
  • October 4, 2013
    onyx902
    There are two YKTTW s like this with very similar descriptions. One should be discarded. [1]
  • October 5, 2013
    EdnaWalker
    ^ I made the descriptions more distinct from each other.
  • October 11, 2013
    KarjamP
    Uh, at first, I thought the current name meant a person who's not a human, but has a human name (ie, the inverse of this trope).

    That's not a good sign.

    The way the title's grammar's constructed makes it ambiguous (and therefore, not clear).
  • October 11, 2013
    EdnaWalker
    What would be a good name for this trope without there being a Trope Namer?
  • October 11, 2013
    KarjamP
    It looks like the word "hiccup" is being used as a verb instead of as a proper noun, thereby maybe confusing people.

    What about "A Human Named Whiskers" or "A Human Named <any Stock Animal Name>"?

  • October 11, 2013
    TheHandle
    Jojos Bizarre Adventure, being chock-full of characters named after songs and bands, has this trope in spades, with names like Oyecomova or a US President named Funny Valentine, together with Edible Theme Naming when it comes to Part 5.
  • October 12, 2013
    DAN004
    Basically, to fit as this trope, ask yourself "is there something nonhuman that is named like that human?" If the answer's yes, then it fits.

    Or at least that's how I understand it. :P
  • October 12, 2013
    randomsurfer
    In a series of 1970s commercials for a certain well-known brand of lip balm, Olympic skiier Suzy Chaffee tells us she has renamed herself "Suzy Chapstick."
  • October 12, 2013
    EdnaWalker
    ^Suzy Chapstick's last name is not a normal human last name, but there are more human surnames that are the names of objects than there are human given names of that vein. Also, Suzy is a normal human given name.

    Human Given Names That Are Words for Things
    • Grace
    • Page (alternate spelling of Paige)
    • Peg
    • Dot (short for Dorothy)
  • October 12, 2013
    DAN004
    Related to Mister Strangenoun, I think?
  • March 7, 2014
    ShiningwingX
    Western Animation

    • Futurama. "I'm Scruffy... the janitor."
  • March 7, 2014
    DAN004
  • April 12, 2014
    Arivne
  • April 12, 2014
    DAN004
  • April 12, 2014
    JustaUsername
    It should be Nonhumanly Named Human as person also can apply to nonhumans.
  • April 13, 2014
    JustaUsername
    Actually, I don't think we need this trope with Name From Another Species getting it's own YTTTW. http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/discussion.php?id=a6znlj4qlpkb7sw37hxpqs5t
  • April 14, 2014
    DAN004
    ^ This trope is a subtrope of Name From Another Species.
  • April 14, 2014
    EdnaWalker
    ^ Unlike Name From Another Species, Nonhumanly Named Human has a name given to a human from a human source. So the name is not from another species, it is just a name not given to humans given to a human by a human.
  • April 18, 2014
    DAN004
    (Sigh) again, Nonhumanly Named Human plz.
  • May 11, 2014
    lakingsif
    I quite like Your Mom Called You What?! (jokes). But Nonhumanly Named Human doesn't have the greatest ring to it. It just doesn't sound so grand, Dan.
  • May 11, 2014
    ShanghaiSlave
    I found Blossom, Bubbles, and Buttercup.

    Real People.
  • May 11, 2014
    StrixObscuro
    Literature
    • In the John Carter Of Mars series, Earthmen who end up on Barsoom often take new names for themselves. John Carter was renamed "Dotar Sojat" by the Tharks, while Ulysses Paxton was given the name "Vad Varo" by Ras Thevas.
  • June 8, 2014
    Paradisesnake
    Do The Powerpuff Girls even count as humans? I mean they were artificially created from "sugar, spice, and everything nice" (+ Chemical X).
  • June 9, 2014
    BradyLady
    Is the trope, a human having a common noun or other standard word for a name, as opposed to a more expected "name-like" name? Then celebrities like Rock Hudson or Stone Phillips might qualify, but then that would also overlap with hippie nature names like River and Leaf. Or is the trope, a human having a name more typical of a pet, such as Rover? In that case, what comes up is a joke about a woman introducing a neighbor to her dog Jonathan and her cat Melissa, and it soon turns out that her children are named Spot and Fluffy.
  • June 9, 2014
    BradyLady
    And if the second interpretation is the case, would Literally a Pet Name describe it?
  • June 9, 2014
    DAN004
    Maybe it's like "it's a real word (unlike Aerith And Bob) but you won't expect a human to be named as such".

    Rock is a viable human name, but nobody names his daughter River.

    At least that's my interpretation.
  • June 25, 2014
    JonnyB
    Can be part of a Whos On First sketch.

    • The Whos On First sketch itself. "Now, on the St. Louis team we have Who's on first, What's on second, I Don't Know is on third..."

    • In the Fred Saberhagen Berserker short story "Goodlife", two humans are captured and brought aboard a berserker ship, where they meet a boy entirely raised by the machine and named by it "Goodlife".
  • June 29, 2014
    TomWalpertac2
    Not entirely sure if this literature example applies...
    • Known Space: In the Man-Kzin Wars stories set a generation or more after the liberation of Wunderland, many Kzin adopt human names.
      • In one story, a human gets raised by a Kzin and gets named "Monkeyshines".
  • July 24, 2014
    JonnyB
  • July 25, 2014
    bejjinks
    "but no one names their child River."

    River Phoenix might argue with you on that one. Overall, the description is very wordy and yet, despite all the excessive words, it lacks clarity. What is this trope supposed to be? The way it's described opens the door to edit wars:

    Bob: "Forest is a typical human name." Alice: "No, Forest is not a typical human name." DeForest Kelly from Star Trek: "Says you."

    This is all just too subjective.
  • July 25, 2014
    DaibhidC
    Agreed. Looking at the list, Blossom strikes me as a perfectly normal name, and Indiana might be unusual, but apart from the fact we get told he shares it with a dog, not particularly inhuman. Humans are simply named all manner of things, in and out of fiction.

    In the words of Terry Pratchett "There was a New York financier called Preserved Fish. That would be quite hard to make up."
  • July 25, 2014
    DAN004
    If what counts for this trope can change in Real Life then this trope can hardly stand.
  • July 29, 2014
    hbi2k
    Agreed. As currently written this does not make sufficiently clear the distinction between "normal human" and "not-normal, inhuman" names.
  • July 29, 2014
    EdnaWalker
    Could you help me with the trope description? What should I say in it and how should it be worded to make the distinction between "normal human" and "not normal human" names clear?

    Types of Nonhuman Names
    • human characters with "word" names that are not normal "human" names, like Stoic
    • human characters with a "nonhuman" name typical of a pet, like Spot, Fluffy, Rover, Fido, or Mittens
  • July 29, 2014
    bejjinks
    First of all, you need to figure out what you mean. We can't help you if you yourself don't have a clear idea what you mean.

    Maybe a good place to start is to just make a few lists: at least one list of names you think are normal and one list of names you think are not. Then compare and contrasts the list to see what the names have in common or what is different about the names.

    Here are some possibilities. There are traditional names that have been passed down from generation to generation such as Bob and Alice. There are names that come from other cultures that are traditional in that culture but new to us such as Jabari and Ashaki. There are ancient names that stopped being traditional such as Gilgamesh and Isabelle. There are names named after something like Dallas and Gemini. There are pet names such as Rover and Fifi. There are nature names such as Forest and Lily. There are virtue names such as Judge and Liberty. There are combined names such as Billy Bob and Peggy Sue. There are portmanteau names such as Alexavier and Emilisa. I have a book of 100,001 Baby Names that I use to help me name characters. There are many, many kinds of names. Which ones do you consider "normal" and which ones do you consider "not normal".
  • July 30, 2014
    rexpensive
    I feel like this could be split into non human names with different narrative purposes. For example something like Dog or Fido could be used to paint the character as being on the same level as animals, low class, perhaps unwanted by his family or some such, while a name from another culture (like an alien one) would imply that character had some special connect with that other culture. A name like Moon or Rainbow might imply a character is a hippy or has hippy parents. Something like "name that is not normal" could be a supertrope, but I think the good trope are the ones connect to some specific purpose.
  • July 30, 2014
    bejjinks
    We already have the supertrope Naming Conventions.
  • July 30, 2014
    DAN004
    ^ That's an index...
  • July 30, 2014
    bejjinks
    Okay, the noob is at it again. What's the difference between an index and a super-trope? I thought indexes were separate from tropes.
  • July 31, 2014
    DAN004
    ^ Supertrope is a trope that encompasses many other tropes. An index is a list of tropes.

    Naming Conventions isn't a trope, so it isn't a supertrope, merely an index.
  • July 31, 2014
    bejjinks
    Thank you. I get it.
  • August 10, 2014
    EdnaWalker
    @bejjinks.

    "Human" Names
    • Traditional Names in Western Culture: Bob, Alice, Isabelle
    • Traditional Names From Other Cultures but New to Weastern Culture: Jabari, Ashaki
    • Ancient Names That Stopped Being Traditional: Gilgamesh, Nimrod
    • "Human" Nature Names: Forest/Forrest, Lily, Rock
    • Combined Two-Word Names: Billy Bob, Peggy Sue
    • Portmanteau Made Entirely of "Human" Names: Alexavier (Alex and Xavier), Emilisa (Emily and Lisa)
    • Place Names: Brooklyn, London, Paris
    • Surname as a First Name: Jackson

    "Non-Human" Names
    • "Pet" Names: Fido, Fluffy, Spot, Rover, Mittens, Patches, Whiskers, Fifi
    • "Non-Human" Word and Object Names: Stoic, Moon, Rainbow
  • August 10, 2014
    bejjinks
    Well how does Stoic fit then? Also Sodapop and Ponyboy are the character's nicknames, not their names. There is a famous actor named Judge Rienhold and there is a producer named Rienhold Weege. Are these "Non-Human" names?

    Get rid of the word normal in the description. If you're going for non-human names being used as human names than say so. Adding the word normal anywhere in the description adds a judgmental bias that offends people. You can use atypical instead because it has the same meaning without the judgmental bias. A guy named Rover would prefer that you said his name was atypical and would rather you didn't say he was not "NORMAL".
  • August 10, 2014
    EdnaWalker
    ^ I looked on the Tv Tropes page for The Outsiders and it says that Ponyboy and Sodapop are the two brother's real names, not their nicknames.

    Stoic fits with the "non-human" names.
  • August 10, 2014
    zarpaulus
    • The Futurama episode "Decision 3012" has Presidential Candidate Chris Zaxxar Travers, his alien-sounding middle name gives Nixon the idea of spreading a rumor that he wasn't born on Earth.
  • August 10, 2014
    justanotherrandomlurker
    ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ I still can't remember what the name of the movie is, but I'm pretty sure one of the dude's names was "Dog." I can't even many details of the movie, I just recall the guy told a girl he met his name, and she was puzzled by it, but again, I think he had Abusive Parents or something.

    That and the only other detail I can remember is a lengthy sequence that takes place in a hospital where one of the characters in the movie, a sultry brunette whom I believe was an antagonist: she snuck in, tied a nurse to a chair and wore her scrubs; she literally scares one patient to death (I think she threatened him with a sledgehammer, which rose his stress level to the point it killed him), then she later poisons another who was a cute and naive blonde whom she shared a random lesbian kiss with.
  • August 10, 2014
    randomsurfer
    ^^^/^^^^Yeah, Sodapop and Ponyboy are the characters' actual, legal names. Soda and Pony are shortnened nicknames. Like Thomas vs Tom.
  • August 11, 2014
    hbi2k
    I get pet names (as in "names that are usually applied to pets and not people").

    But what, objectively, is the difference between "human" place/object/nature names and "non-human" ones? What makes "Lily" and "Rock" any more "human" than "Moon" and "Rainbow"?

    You seem to be defining "human" as "common in Western culture and a few other cultures I happen to have some passing familiarity with" and "non-human" as "anything else."
  • August 11, 2014
    DAN004
    ^ now try unusual Japanese name. Or Chinese. Or Korean. :P
  • August 11, 2014
    EdnaWalker
    @hbi2k and DAN 004: I'm defining a "human" given name as a given name typical for a human for every culture, not just Western culture. So, could you help me find "non-human" given names in Japanese, Chinese, Korean, an other cultures, not just Western culture.
  • August 11, 2014
    hbi2k
    ^ I can't, because you have yet to define what makes a name "non-human".
  • August 11, 2014
    DarkCyberWolf
    How about this? Can any of you think of examples of human characters named "Fido" or "Patches" or "Whiskers" or "Spot" or "Flipper"? Because those are nonhuman names.
  • August 11, 2014
    EdnaWalker
    ^ and ^^: Also, can you think of examples of human characters named with the animal names, "Tama" or "Pochi." Those are "non-human" names in the Japanese language.
  • August 11, 2014
    DAN004
    Uh, kinda argue that Once-Ler is just "Wuncler", a real name, but written differently. (Only found it in The Boondocks, tho)
  • August 15, 2014
    randomsurfer
    ^Boondocks' Wuncler is explicitly named after Suess's Once-ler.
  • August 15, 2014
    DAN004
    ^ ah, thanks for correcting me.
  • September 6, 2014
    EdnaWalker
    Nonhumanly Named Human is a human character with a name that isn't a typical human name for any given culture, often a name typically given to pets or animals (like Spot, Flipper, Patches, Tama, or Pochi), an object or word name not typically given to humans that looks or sounds close to a typical human name (Bridge instead of Bridget, Sofa instead of Sofia/Sophia, Gorge instead of George, Gym instead of Jim/Jem, Kuroi instead of Chloe), or an object or word name not typically given to humans (like Stoic, Moon, Rainbow, Lamp, or Cinderblock).
  • September 6, 2014
    DAN004
    ^ Souda is actually a Japanese name. ;)
  • September 7, 2014
    EdnaWalker
    Is Soda/Souda a typical or atypical given name for a human in Japanese?

    Is Lampwick a typical or atypical given name for a human?
  • September 7, 2014
    johnnycache
  • September 7, 2014
    DAN004
    ^^ Lampwick I dunno. At least the surnames with "wick" are accepted in Real Life, but then ppl in fiction makes puns with the actual "wick".

    So I think yes, that can work as a proper human name. Even Bombwick can be accepted.
  • October 5, 2014
    JujuP
    Video Game
    • In Sid Meiers Alpha Centauri extension, Alien Crossfire, Aki Zeta-Five, progeny of a Norvegian father and an algorithm, is named as a computer.
  • October 15, 2014
    EdnaWalker
    Could Nonhumanly Named Human (A human character with a name atypical for a human) be a supertrope and atypical names for humans that are linked to something (like Really A Pet Name for humans with names typical for pets but not for humans or a narrative device) be tropes?
  • October 15, 2014
    hbi2k
    ^ Not until/unless you actually define what counts as "atypical for a human" in a non-arbitrary, non-circular way.
  • October 15, 2014
    DAN004
    I'd like to point it out again that what counts as a nonhuman name would be kinda subjective, and different cultures would have different standards.

    One evidence is the part of the description that says "Seven isn't a normal name, but Nana is".

    That would make this trope very complicated and context-heavy (on where the work was made and perhaps where the characters were born/raised).
  • October 15, 2014
    EdnaWalker
    ^^ What would be a non-arbitrary, non-circular way of defining a name that counts as "atypical for a human"?
  • October 15, 2014
    DAN004
    ^ "arbitrary" means "vague"; i.e ill-defined.
  • November 17, 2014
    hbi2k
    ^^ I don't know, but then, I'm not trying to create a trope that relies on it in order to be tropeable.

    But you can't use terms like "typical for a human" in your definition of "typical for a human," that's what I mean by circular. Ex:

    The name is a real word (unlike Aerith and Bob) but you won't expect a human to be named as such. Some common word names, like Grace, Page (alternate spelling of Paige), Hunter, Willow, Forest (alternate spelling of Forrest), Peg, Dot (short for Dorothy), and Rock are typical "human" given games, but Stoic, Moon, Rainbow, Lamp, and Cinderblock are not.

    You've categorized these names into "human" and "non-human," but you haven't explained WHY you've sorted them into the categories. That's not a definition, it's just a list of examples.
  • April 15, 2016
    Pichu-kun
    • The protagonist of Melanie Martinez's Concept Album "Cry Baby" is implied to be literally named that. According to the music video to the song "Cry Baby" she was named that by her older brother after her birth.
  • April 15, 2016
    Aubren
    In other words, this trope is "humans with names that aren't typical names in their language. And NOT because they were adopted by another species."

    If we have this trope, I want the inverse one where animals, aliens, robots, and other living beings get "human" names, even though they're nt adopted/named by humans.
  • April 15, 2016
    Pichu-kun
    ^ But human names are the norm except in xenofiction.
  • April 16, 2016
    DAN004
    ^^ That... sounds pretty tropable.
  • April 16, 2016
    NotOnAnyFlatbread
    Ill-defined description, and extremely subjective. To me, this just sounds like Complaining About Names You Don't Like, or more precisely, making fun of names you think are weird. Which is bad enough if it's supposed to be a trope about fiction, and gets especially horrible once you start planning to include Real Life people.

    What is a "normal" name is primarily cultural, so if this gets troped, any "weird" name arising from a fictional culture should be ineligible from the get-go. Are we going to list every single human character from The Lord Of The Rings or Star Wars or Discworld because their completely fictional cultures use names that sound "funny" to us? That would be absurd and insane.

    Also, how are disagreements about what constitutes a "normal" name going to be resolved without any objective criteria? For example, DAN 004 apparently thinks "Rock" is a normal human name while "River" is weird, whereas I would say the exact opposite. How many real humans have to have that name before it counts as "normal"?
  • April 17, 2016
    DAN004
    ^ perhaps you wanna try to explain Funny Valentine. :P

    It's indeed kinda tempting to list ridiculous names that we found but in the end the list itself would look ridiculous. Sometimes names that we thought as ridiculous is a norm in the work; it becomes murky in that case.

    It's rather telling when the description says "this deals with the audience's perspective of what counts as a "non-human" name" that this is gonna get ugly rather quickly.
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