The You Bastard Job Offer
You odious, twisty, scheming, lying bastard! Would you like a job?
Tropeworthy? Up For Grabs Better Name Up For Grabs

(permanent link) added: 2011-09-22 03:08:39 sponsor: unclerupee (last reply: 2014-06-19 04:48:10)

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A character fights a corporation or organisation (or even sometimes an individual) with, ahem, less than honourable methods, and upon winning and generally gloating to the defeated party, the opponent describes him accurately as a slimy bastard and asks him if he wants to work for them, saying that those are just the right qualities to get far in this business! Most of the time, the offer isn't accepted or laughed off as a joke; its more of a gesture of how the character's bastard tactics impress the opponent.

Related to Not So Different and Insult Backfire.

Examples

Comic Strip
  • One MAD magazine strip about a guy applying for a job. First, he's chewed out by the boss for exaggerating more shamelessly than anyone else the boss has met. Second, he's offered a job at advertising.

Film
  • The protagonist of the French comedy The Closet is a Ridiculously Average Guy who ends up has pretended to be gay in order to keep his job. Along the way, things start going better for him at the company, and when his lie is exposed, he basically ends up promoted- his boss hadn't paid any attention to him before, but is impressed because he now knows the protagonist is a bit of a shifty bastard.

Literature
  • Discworld series novel Going Postal. Moist Von Lipwig describes himself as a liar and a conman. Lord Vetenari's response? "Welcome to government service!"

Live-Action TV
  • In the second series of Blackadder, Blackadder avoids paying a debt to the Bank Of The Black Monks Of St. Herod and their representative the "Baby Eating Bishop Of Bath And Wells" by eventually managing to blackmail the Bishop. The Bishop says at one point: "Never have I encountered such corrupt and foul-minded perversity! Have you ever considered a career in the Church?"
  • On one episode of Law & Order: SVU, a judge calls Stabler out on his interrogation methods (which often dive into the Hannibal Lecture and physical violence)... and immediatly later requests him to interrogate a convict who killed his son it turns out he wasn't dead, and the interrogation was more to confirm the judge's suspicions that the man he was processing in that episode was in fact his son
  • A variation on Seinfeld, in which George has a job interview for the New York Yankees, and because he is acting on the opposite of his instincts, is brutally frank about his previous terminations (including being fired from one job for having sex with his secretary, and quitting another job because his boss wouldn't let him use his private bathroom). The interviewer sees no future for George, but introduces him to George Steinbrenner anyway; after George goes into a rant about how Steinbrenner has ruined the legacy of the Yankees by running the organization into the ground all for the sake of his glorious ego, Steinbrenner has only one thing to say:
    "Hire this man."

Web Comics
  • How Collin gets his job at Creed in Friendly Hostility. They ignore his resume and focus on his criminal record, before declaring that he has "potential." Other People's Business reveals why Creed would want a morally grey shading distinctly into pitch black employee.
  • A Lesson Is Learned But The Damage Is Irreversible: In "I Came About the Job", Mr Hellman is applying for a job when the hiring manager decides to kill himself out of the blue. Hellman tries to sneak away, then the manager reveals he isn't actually dead:
    Manager: Sneakin' out on a dead man! I like your style! Mrs. Anderson, Mr. Hellman is starting in the mailroom on Monday.

Western Animation
  • In the "Psycho Therapy" episode of Daria, the Morgandorfer family is sent to a therapy session by Helen's law firm to see if she was right for promotion. Considering that one of the most prevalent Tropes of Daria is Dysfunctional Family, when Helen's superior found out that the therapy concluded that Helen so far out-prioritized her work over her family life instead of deeming her unfit for promotion, he said her commitment to her job was exactly what he had hoped to find.

Real Life
  • Reinhard Gehlen was a General in the German Army during World War II, who served as chief of intelligence-gathering on the Eastern Front. After the war, he was recruited by the United States military to set up a spy ring directed against the Soviet Union (known as the Gehlen Organization), and eventually became head of the West German intelligence apparatus.
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