Created By: CupcakeTrapFebruary 17, 2013

Asteroids do not concern me, Admiral

Asteroids do not concern me

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Trope
A ruthless military commander disregards warnings about hazards to their subordinates in the course of carrying out a mission.

Examples:
  • Empire Strikes Back -- "Asteroids do not concern me, Admiral"
  • Avatar: The Last Airbender -- "Do the tides command this ship?"
Community Feedback Replies: 27
  • February 17, 2013
    SeptimusHeap
    Pardon, but No New Stock Phrases, so this will need another name.
  • February 17, 2013
    KarjamP
    Also suffers from Trope Namer Syndrome.
  • February 18, 2013
    spacemarine50
    Permission to completely edit this? There's potential, but not like this.
  • February 18, 2013
    Tuckerscreator
    Pretty much covered by Never Tell Me The Odds and I Like Those Odds.
  • February 18, 2013
    Koveras
    If this is to work, we need a better title. Compare Suicidal Overconfidence.

  • February 18, 2013
    aurora369
    Never Tell Me The Odds is about statistical low probability of success, this is disregard of a specific hazard. Disregarding A Hazard, Disrespecting A Hazard, perhaps, or if it has to be specifically about a military commander, Enemies Are Dangerous Hazards Are Not?
  • February 18, 2013
    randomsurfer
    In the film Soldier a gung ho Colonel regularly dismisses a battle-vetran captain's advice, leading to the death of the Colonel and all his underlings including the Captain.
  • February 18, 2013
    Random888
    Look, just because Darth Vader said a cool line doesn't mean it's a trope.
  • February 18, 2013
    StarSword
    @KarjamP: This is not a case of Trope Namer Syndrome, unless that's been extended to include "trope name is a little too specific". It is, however, a line-of-dialog title and prevented by No New Stock Phrases as Septimus already pointed out. I'm liking Disregarding A Hazard.

    Film:
    • Free Willy 2 has the captain of an oil tanker disregard the warnings of his helmsman that going 15 knots in that region, especially without a tug escort, is just asking for trouble. Cue the tanker pulling an Exxon Valdez.
  • February 18, 2013
    Stratadrake
    I would call this a Downplayed case of Trope Namer Syndrome - naming a trope solely after your favorite example of itself, though the underlying definition looks workable (it just needs some more elaboration).
  • February 18, 2013
    foxley
    How about Damn The Torpedoes as an alternative name? It's a fairly well-known expression and was supposedly said by Admiral David Farragut during the Battle of Mobile Bay. In a Real Life example of this trope, he asked why his ships were retreating and was told "Torpedoes". His response was "Damn the torpedoes!" and he ordered his fleet to advance into the bay, carrying the day and winning the battle.
  • February 18, 2013
    TonyG
    Seconding Damn The Torpedoes.
  • February 18, 2013
    Xtifr
    Damn The Torpedoes is good. Though a quick google tells me we'll have to add "Not to be confused with the Tom Petty album of the same name." But the fact that there's an album with this name just emphasizes how well-known the phrase is.
  • February 18, 2013
    Catbert
    Another vote for Damn The Torpedoes.
  • February 18, 2013
    Stratadrake
    ... I've never heard that phrase before, so it doesn't have any meaning to me. I would rather call it To Hell With Danger.
  • February 18, 2013
    FastEddie
    Damning The Torpedoes ducks the "sounds like dialog" death knell.
  • February 18, 2013
    Stratadrake
    Not to be confused with "man/arm/fire the torpedos", because the phrase is a reference to the enemy's weapons and not your own. I know I have issues with that confusion....
  • February 18, 2013
    Sackett
    "Damn The Torpedoes, full speed ahead!" is one of the most famous lines ever spoken in a naval battle. I think it's a great title.

    Perhaps only superseded by "I Have Not Yet Begun To Fight"
  • February 18, 2013
    oneuglybunny
    Another vote for Damn The Torpedos with Farragut's quote as the page citation.

    If this is a trope, then it would fall somewhere on the Badass Scale. It describes a character so tough that imminent danger doesn't sway him. This guy can stare Death in the eye and not blink. It also shows the character has such a fixation upon his objective that all else is relegated to insignificance. This may result in a Pyrrhic Victory.
  • February 18, 2013
    StarSword
    ^I was thinking the original version better described a leader with a We Have Reserves mentality, fixated on his objective and disregarding his subordinates' concerns.
  • February 18, 2013
    Sackett
    I'd say that it's just that this trope can be played different ways. Either it can be an unfeeling We Have Reserves, or it could be a Grant-like continuous attack strategy.

    A Union Officer told him that General Lee was a genius. Ulysses told him, "I will grab the buckle of this genius, and kick him, until this genius, his army, and his rebel nation is dead, and gone beyond recall."
  • February 18, 2013
    billybobfred
    Has it been mentioned that the laconic needs work? Simply repeating the title doesn't actually explain the trope...
  • February 19, 2013
    passivesmoking
    Isn't this just a subtrope of We Have Reserves?
  • February 19, 2013
    Nithael
    I don't think we need to make a trope out of every sentence in Star Wars.
  • February 19, 2013
    Arivne
    For those of you who missed it (and it was easy to miss), Fast Eddie said up above that Damn The Torpedoes would violate No New Stock Phrases and therefore cannot be used.

    He suggested Damning The Torpedoes instead.
  • February 19, 2013
    foxley
  • February 19, 2013
    Tallens
    The current description would serve better as the laconic.

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