Super Toughness
The power of unambiguously superhuman durability.


(permanent link) added: 2011-05-10 20:57:30 sponsor: Discar (last reply: 2011-05-10 20:57:57)

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Tags: Needs a Better Title, Needs More Examples, Rolling Updates, Seen It a Million Times, How Did We Miss This One?.

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The power of unambiguously superhuman durability, ranging from being "merely" capable of taking a dozen gunshot wounds and keeping walking like they were nothing, to getting hit by a train car and only suffering a few shallow cuts and minor bruises, to having enough explosives to take out a skyscraper strapped to your chest, have them detonate, and get a few second degree burns and maybe a couple of broken ribs for your trouble [[hottip:*: Well, assuming that you don't get buried under enough rubble that you suffocate to death, that is]].

This is a Required Secondary Power to be able to do anything with Super Strength; without it, Newton's Second Law would result in you breaking your hand every time you threw a super-punch, and every bone would snap under the tension of lifting a car.

Nigh-Invulnerability is this trope's big brother, where almost nothing is able to harm the character. Compare Made of Iron, where an explicitly non-superpowered character can take a lot more punishment that is normally possible for no apparent or explained reason.

Often takes Nigh-Invulnerability's place in the Flying Brick package for "lower-tier" superhumans. Sometimes a side-effect of particularly adaptive Healing Factors. Most Super Soldiers possess it. Combine it with Super Strength, and you're likely to end up with the Implacable Man.

Examples

General

Anime and Manga
  • In Ghost in the Shell, Mokoto Kusanagi, courtesy of bionics.
  • In InuYasha, Yokai and Hanyou can take more damage than a human can.
  • In Macross, lampshaded by Bretai:
    "I am not built as weakly as you are"
  • This is basically Shioon's power in The Breaker.

Comic Books
  • Rogue of the X-Men, when she was a Flying Brick (due to a certain instance of power absorption), was usually tough but not fully invulnerable. One comic had her taking a bullet to the head, which knocked her out (whereas such things would simply bounce off of other Flying Bricks).

Film
  • In the case of Robocop, this arguably is his main superpower, with super strength and justified Improbable Aiming Skills as his secondary ones.
  • Not sure if King Kong or other Daikaiju count or not, since relative to size, human weapons are rather puny.
  • The Terminator, especially in its debut film. It's not indestructible, it takes damage throughout the film. Actually getting what's left of it to stop is another story.

Live-Action TV
  • Buffy the Vampire Slayer gives us Buffyverse vamps, Slayers and many species of demons. All of them can take quite a beating, ranging from being able to take a full-force beatdown from someone with super strength to needing a specific way to be killed.
  • Firefly gives us the Reavers. They're basically rape-obsessed Space Zombies. Fighting them just isn't done, and a pretty weak one beat Janye.

Video Games
  • Master Chief of Halo fame is a Spartan-II who can survive atmospheric reentry and subsequent impact with the ground almost unaided. The fact that he didn't turn into a squishy soup like mixture is a testament to his Super Toughness.
  • Prototype gives us Alex Mercer. He isn't unkillable, but multiple RPGs, choppers, tanks and zombies aren't going to do the job unless the player is playing the game wrong.

Real Life
  • It's now believed that Martial-Art experts actually develop denser bone structure with training, allowing them to break objects with their bare hands with reduced skeletal injury.

Tags: Needs a Better Title, Needs More Examples, Rolling Updates, Seen It a Million Times, How Did We Miss This One?.

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