Information is Power
Why do you need More Dakka when all you need is one well aimed spitball?
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(permanent link) added: 2011-06-22 03:12:11 sponsor: fasti3ear (last reply: 2012-03-16 16:41:51)

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So the idea here is that, the power of a weapon or a character or whatever isn't dependent on it's ability to make large explosions, but on extreme ease of use and ability to collect abundant information and use it in a practical and/or precise way. To the point where you have to ask, why do we even need More Dakka?

To use an example. A character has the ability to sense everything there is to know about his enemies either with psychic powers or some Applied Phlebotinum. What he is thinking, how his muscles feel, and his exact location are easy to process and gather. The character would then be able to predict his movement and counter then easily, going right for the weak spot: the less-than-ideal heart valve that even the enemy didn't know about, Guaranteeing an instant kill with very very little physical effort.

That isn't to say that this Trope is mutually exclusive from Tropes like More Dakka, and combining them could make an unstoppable weapon. IT is that the point of this Trope is that information is as important of a tool in fighting as is just raw power.

Any machine or device, psychic ability, or pre-cognative ability that grants a power like this, and good-ol-fashion Genre Savvy planning and information gathering counts.

Examples

  • District9 The mech at the end that is piloted by Wikus would have still been awesome if it used far more weaker explosives that us humans use, just because the interface was THAT powerful and easy to use to plan barrages.

  • Neon Genesis Evangelion 's NERV was pretty much this. Episode 9 is a PERFECT example of this when they defeated the angel using a pre practiced dance routine made specifically for defeating that angel.
They collected a boatload of information and could predict what the angel was going to do before the angel did it. And made a perfect counter to everything the angel was going to do.

  • Code Geass : Remember Mao? That was his entire thing. He could predict what you were going to do because he could read your mind.

  • Next, the movie with Nicolas Cage in it, pretty much used this as its main plot device.

  • Naruto: The Byakugan, used by Hyuga Neji is basically this. Let alone his normal powers to detect and hit your bodies weakspots.

  • A New Hope The rebel alliance uses stolen plans to destroy a super heavily arm battle station, with enough Firepower to destroy planets and any large battlecruiser it comes across, by just a handful of rebel fighters.

  • Star Fleet Battles. Some "Monster Killing" scenarios require the starship's crew to gather information on a monster in order to find out how to destroy it. Once the solution is found, it's possible for the monster to be eliminated by a relatively minor effort, such as grabbing it with a tractor beam or sending a probe into it.

  • Star Trek TOS The Doomsday Weapon, Spock (in reply to the question; "What If There Is Another?") basically said feed it an asteroid with a nuke inside. Kirk had to pull off a near-kamikazi with another star-ship to destroy the first one.

  • An episode of Numbers has Charlie taking an FBI course. He initially has doubts about failing his gun qualification, but is able to do by instead of trying to shoot as many rounds as possible in the alloted time, sending a few well aimed shots right into the bullseye. He ends up either getting the highest possible score, simply getting an extremely high score (I haven't seen the episode in awhile).

  • In the League of Extraordinary Gentlemen movie, Alan Quartermain advises Tom Sawyer to follow this line of thinking (i.e. he should learn how to aim/snipe rather than just use More Dakka).

  • One of Medusa's more impressive gambits was to manipulate the entire battle for B.R.E.W using little more than a handful of spies by having Chrona infect Marie with a device which would drive Dr. Stein insane to prevent him from getting to it too early and allow the Mizune sisters to grab B.R.E.W and replace it with a fake while both sides were fighting.

  • The Assassin class in Dungeons & Dragons has an ablity which allows them to analyse a target for a bit and then make an instant kill attack.

  • In Gamma World, this is the gimmick of the Hypercognitive class. They get a number of Attack Its Weak Point and Awesomeness by Analysis skills, and also have bonuses to dodging and reflexes because no attack or trap can ever really catch them by surprise.

  • One of the youkai in InuYasha could read minds, allowing it to easily counter any attack its enemies could throw at it. It also liked to demoralize its enemies by calling their attacks.

  • Subverted in The Incredible Hulk #300. A mindless Hulk is trashing New York and all of Marvel's heroes assemble to try to stop him. Iron Fist believes that if he can hit Hulk in just the right spot he'll keel over. Fist approaches Hulk, looks him over, chooses his spot, powers up his fist, strikes...and Hulk catches Fist's fist, redirecting all the energy back into him.

  • Typical of the Guile Hero and the Magnificent Bastard. In A Song Of Iceand Fire, both Littlefinger and Varys are made of this trope, relying purely on social networking, intelligence-gathering and wits to remain in place. In Discworld, you get what happens when a more moral version of this sort of individual actually ascends to dictatorship. His job is compared to that of an engineer: find the point of least resistance and achieve the desired outcome with minimal effort. For him, that is, his puppets sweat plenty, but the beauty of it is that they do it all on their own initiative.

  • In a lot of videogames, Maphacks are a great example of this. A fourm of cheating that doesn't make your gun any more powerful or accurate, but instead gives you the ability to see everything and know exactly what the other players are doing at all times.

  • You can also add a lot of real life examples here too. I mean, from what I understand, often times military success is determined by who has the MOST information, not who has the biggest guns.
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