Created By: Jess0312 on August 22, 2013 Last Edited By: Jess0312 on September 4, 2013

Co-Lancers

Two or more than one Lancer.

Name Space:
Main
Page Type:
Trope
Needs a Better Description Needs More Examples

The opposite of Co-Dragons, its Evil Counterpart. The Hero has two or more Lancers who are Foils to him or her, and are regarded as equally dangerous among the other characters. They will usually have distinctive personalities, roles, or skill-sets, or may perform the same job but in different regions, but just like a single Lancer would be, they are answerable only to The Hero and are significant threats in their own right.

For example: This often happens when a Sixth Ranger is introduced. Most Sixth Rangers function as a second Lancer, if not just replacing the current one after a season or so goes by, or if The Rival every decides to join the team one 'Lancer' will be friendlier, and the Rival will become a more vitriolic 'Lancer'

Compare and Contrast Co-Dragons, its Evil Counterpart.


Examples:

[[foldercontrol]]

[[folder:Anime & Manga]]
  • Code Geass: Both Suzaku and Kallen are this to Lelouch, although they rarely work together (in fact they're known to butt heads with each other).
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Comic Books]]
  • In most rosters of The Avengers, we have Captain America, Iron Man, and The Mighty Thor. Cap is usually the leader while Thor and Iron Man are both lancers in different ways. Tony is more willing to skirt the rules for pragmatic reasons while Thor has a very strict honor code that he feels must be enforced with Cap in between.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Literature]]
  • Cahir the Knight is Geralt's foil throughout most of The Witcher saga, but The Smart Guy and Vegetarian Vampire Regis also serves as one to Geralt and is promoted to Lancer during the Final Battle after Cahir is killed and Regis starts drinking human blood again.
  • In the twelfth century portion of the Deryni timeline, Duke Alaric Morgan and Prince Nigel Haldane become this in relation to Nigel's nephew, King Kelson Haldane. Both men have superior combat skills, in part because they were largely raised together in the royal household; Morgan's cousin Duncan makes a joke about both men's propensity for weaponry when Nigel is revealed to be carrying two daggers in addition to his sword (Morgan being famous for his sleeve stiletto). While Morgan handles the magic (including helping trigger Kelson's powers and showing him how to use them), Nigel helps with more administrative tasks (he trains the pages and squires in the royal household) and acts as Regent when Kelson is absent or otherwise unable to preside at court.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Series]]
  • Star Trek: Although technically Spock was the official second in command and outranked Dr. McCoy, in practice they were Kirk's co-equal advisers.
[[/folder]]

[[folder:Western Animation]]
  • While most of the team are on equal terms, Applejack and Rainbow Dash tend to take turns being Twilight Sparkle's primary confidants in My Little Pony: Friendship Is Magic, with Spike being her right hand man.
[[/folder]]


Community Feedback Replies: 23
  • August 22, 2013
    Lumpenprole
    Although technically Spock was the official second in command and outranked Dr. Mc Coy, in practice they were Kirk's co-equal advisers.
  • August 22, 2013
    Psi001
    • While most of the team are on equal terms, Applejack and Rainbow Dash tend to take turns being Twilight Sparkle's primary confidants in My Little Pony Friendship Is Magic, with Spike being her right hand man.
  • August 22, 2013
    DAN004
    • Code Geass: Both Suzaku and Kallen are this to Lelouch, although they rarely work together (in fact they're known to butt heads with each other).
  • August 22, 2013
    Larkmarn
    You know The Lancer doesn't actually mean second-in-command, right?
  • August 22, 2013
    Jess0312
    So what The Lancer does actually mean then?
  • August 22, 2013
    Larkmarn
    The Lancer is a close ally of the hero who acts as The Foil. He's usually the Number Two, but not always. Check the page.
  • August 22, 2013
    Jess0312
    I already did. I just changed the "second-in-command" part to "Lancer".
  • August 23, 2013
    acrobox
    You should note that this often happens when a Sixth Ranger is introduced. Most Sixth Rangers function as a second Lancer, if not just replacing the current one after a season or so goes by.

    Or if The Rival every decides to join the team one 'Lancer' will be friendlier, and the Rival will become a more vitriolic 'Lancer'
  • August 23, 2013
    Larkmarn
    I don't know if this is strictly tropeable as is, unless there's a particular relationship between the two lancers.

    As-is, it would just be "The Lancer, but more" which isn't a trope.
  • August 23, 2013
    Koveras

    I haven't played Spec Ops The Line, but don't both of your Non Player Companions serve as lancers to the the "hero"?
  • August 23, 2013
    Jess0312
    What do you mean?
  • August 23, 2013
    Koveras
    I was just asking other tropers who have more than passing knowledge of the game to confirm o deny the fragmentary impression I got that this game fits this trope definition. :)
  • August 23, 2013
    69BookWorM69
    Hmm. I'm not sure this is what you have in mind, but I'll present it and see what you think:

    • In the twelfth century portion of the Deryni timeline, Duke Alaric Morgan and Prince Nigel Haldane become this in relation to Nigel's nephew, King Kelson Haldane. Both men have superior combat skills, in part because they were largely raised together in the royal household; Morgan's cousin Duncan makes a joke about both men's propensity for weaponry when Nigel is revealed to be carrying two daggers in addition to his sword (Morgan being famous for his sleeve stiletto). While Morgan handles the magic (including helping trigger Kelson's powers and showing him how to use them), Nigel helps with more administrative tasks (he trains the pages and squires in the royal household) and acts as Regent when Kelson is absent or otherwise unable to preside at court.
  • August 25, 2013
    69BookWorM69
    Correct me if I'm wrong, but doesn't this sort of thing come about in a Geodesic Cast? Pointing that out might help your description a bit.
  • August 27, 2013
    Jess0312
    What do you mean with that?
  • August 27, 2013
    69BookWorM69
    A Geodesic Cast involves a large number of characters who have similar roles, with contrasts between the similar characters as in The Foil. It sounds to me like this is one of the things that happens in a Geodesic Cast. I suppose that's why I brought it up after adding the Deryni example: those books have such a cast.
  • August 27, 2013
    AP
    • In most rosters of The Avengers, we have Captain America, Iron Man, and The Mighty Thor. Cap is usually the leader while Thor and Iron Man are both lancers in different ways. Tony is more willing to skirt the rules for pragmatic reasons while Thor has a very strict honor code that he feels must be enforced with Cap in between.
  • August 29, 2013
    kjnoren
    Sounds a lot like Freudian Trio or the The Three Faces Of Adam (in the adventure, authority, wisdom form).
  • August 29, 2013
    DAN004
    ^ Though their relationship doesn't necessarily have to be that way...
  • August 29, 2013
    ShanghaiSlave
    • 69BookWorM69 -- geodesic cast refers to to similar groups (e.g. a story has three Power Trio). not people with similar roles in one group.
    • if Co Dragons is a trope, then i guess it's pretty logical that this one is too.
    though can't really add an example at the moment, check out the wicks for The Lancer, as a lot of works have two or more of them in one team.
  • August 29, 2013
    69BookWorM69
    ^ I wrote "come about in a Geodesic Cast", in other words, this could happen in or be part of a Geodesic Cast.
  • August 29, 2013
    ShanghaiSlave
    i see. though still think it's not worth mentioning to avoid confusion or at least, Cast Herd would be more fitting. as it's not limited to similar groups (which the current trope image doesn't exactly illustrate)
  • August 30, 2013
    kjnoren
    ^^^^ We already have a general trio trope (Power Trio), and the relationship between The Hero and The Lancer isn't the same as that between the Big Bad and The Dragon.

    The Lancer is there to act as a foil and a counterpoint to the hero. If we get two of them, showing off different aspects and playing off each other, then I think looking at the trio tropes is the way to go.

    But The Dragon's relation to the Big Bad isn't strictly that as a foil - there is a strong hierarchical element in their relation. (For that matter, looking over the examples for The Dragon, I must say it's an unholy mess of things.) That makes it much more easy, from a storytelling standpoint, to have multiple dragons than it is to have multiple lancers.
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