Created By: nathandoe2016 on June 17, 2012 Last Edited By: nathandoe2016 on June 30, 2012
Nuked

Fictional Deities

The different religions and deities in various fictional works.

Name Space:
Main
Page Type:
Trope
In many fictional works where Christianity, Judaism, Buddhism, and the other assortments of religion don't exist there are usually made up religions. Or, the opposite happens and there is no mention of religions whatsoever. That does not mean religion doesn't exist in that world, but it just isn't mentioned. Often times there are different religions that clash such as the Faith of the Seven and the believers in R'hllor in Game of Thrones. The difference between this and Mythopoeia is that while a myth is generally a belief in a god that is rarely worshipped anymore(ex: Zeus), a religion is the worshiping of a god that many people believe in(ex: Buddha). An example that is mythology would be people a story taking place during the time when Greece was a great empire.If there is proof that the gods exist, then that would be a religion. However if there is a story that takes place in modern times in which the Greeks belief in many gods is generally not believed, and there is no proof of it, then the Hellenistic religion of the Greeks would be mythology.

No Real Life Examples, Please!, for obvious reasons.


Examples

The Other Wiki has a list of these here.

Comics
  • In The DCU there are many upon many deities here are a few of them: Ares, Darkseid, Doomsday,Circe, Parallax, and Resurrection Man.
  • There are also many in the Marvel Universe although the most famous one is most likely Thor.

Film
  • Flash Gordon (1980). Emperor Ming worships the great god Dyzan, and the Arborians worship a deity named Arbor.

Literature
  • The Faith of the Seven, and those that believe in R'hllor in the Game of Thrones(television series based of A Song of Ice and Fire) and A Song of Ice and Fire(a series of books).
  • The Lords of the Higher Worlds in Michael Moorcock's Elric Of Melnibone and The Chronicles Of Corum stories. They include the Lords of Chaos (such as Arioch and Xiombarg), The Lords of Law (e.g. Donblas the Justice Maker and Arkyn), the Dead Gods, the Beast-Lords, and Elemental deities such as Grome, Straasha, and Kakatal.
  • J. R. R. Tolkien's The Silmarillion had Eru Iluvatar and the Valar. The Valar included males (Manwe, Ulmo, Aule, Orome, Mandos, Lorien, Tulkas, Melkor/Morgoth) and females (Varda, Yavanna, Nienna, Este, Vaire, Vana and Nessa).
  • Robert E. Howard's Conan stories. Some of the deities in the stories were from Real Life, such as Set, Mannannan (Mac Lir), Erlik, Ymir and several Hindu deities. However, some of them were fictional, such as Mitra, Crom, Hothath, Valka, Pteor, the spider god of Yezud, Bel the god of thieves, Jullah and the Golden Peacock. There's a list of them here.
  • H.P. Lovecraft's Cthulhu Mythos had a number of deities, such as Azathoth, Yog-Sothoth, Shub-Niggurath, Nyarlathotep, Ghatanothoa, Yig, Cthulhu and Hastur.

Live-Action Television
  • In Buffy there are The Powers That Be, Jasmine, The First Evil, Glorificus, Olaf The Troll God, Illyria, and Dinza.

Tabletop Games
  • Dungeons & Dragons flip-flops: there's settings with gods they made up de novo, but there's also sourcebooks (e.g. Deities and Demigods) that import entire real-world pantheons to the setting. (I can't remember whether they stayed away from polytheistic religions that still have adherents in the modern day. Monotheism, of course, is Right Out.) Some of the gods of specific settings:
    • Birthright: Azrai, Anduiras, Haelyn, Roele, Sera, Avani, Eric, Vorynn, Belinik, Kreisha, etc.
    • Dragonlance: About 25 altogether, including Paladine, Mishakal, Takhisis and Reorx.
    • Forgotten Realms: Dozens, such as Auril, Azuth, Beshaba and Chauntea.
    • Greyhawk: Quite a large number, including Boccob, Incabulos, Istus, Pelor and Rao.
    • Scarred Lands: One for each Character Alignment - Corean, Madriel, Tanil, Hedrada, Denev, Enkili, Chardun, Belsameth and Vangal. The various Titans also count.
  • Atlantis: The Lost World generic RPG setting. A number of nations in the setting worshiped the Old Gods: Abbar (rain, harvest), Ash (time, luck and secrets), Atta (strength, ferocity), Eloah (the heavens and the day), Hawwa (the moon and the night), Mana (wisdom), Og (strength, fertility), Sarra (women and feminine virtues), Saha (the wind, freedom), Tama (forests), Tara (men and masculine virtues), Vana (peace and goodness), Xax (death and decay), Za (the underworld). . .
  • In the Magic: The Gathering plane of Zendikar, the Merfolk worship the pantheon of Emeria, Cosi, and Ula, with the Kor worshiping similar gods by a different name. It turns out that these "gods" are really the Ancient Eldrazi Progenitors, Emrakul, Kozilek, and Ulamog.
Toys
  • In BIONICLE there are the Great Beings.

Community Feedback Replies: 40
  • June 17, 2012
    bigJoe
  • June 17, 2012
    captainsandwich
    Do religions with Crystal Dragon Jesus count? Also my understanding is Dungeons And Dragons' gods tend to be fairly original.
  • June 17, 2012
    nathandoe2016
    ^Yes a Crystal Dragon Jesus would count
  • June 17, 2012
    elwoz
    Dungeons And Dragons flip-flops: there's settings with gods they made up de novo, but there's also sourcebooks (e.g. Deities and Demigods) that import entire real-world pantheons to the setting. (I can't remember whether they stayed away from polytheistic religions that still have adherents in the modern day. Monotheism, of course, is Right Out.)
  • June 17, 2012
    Cider
    Seems to be the same thing as Mythopoeia.
  • June 17, 2012
    nathandoe2016
    ^Mythopoeia is a created fictional world or universe, this is a fictional religion, so maybe it could be a subtrope of Mythopoeia
  • June 17, 2012
    Cider
    Then you'll have to address the differences, otherwise it may see early misuse. Are there any examples of this that would not be Mythopoeia? Mythopoeia is explicitly not the construction of a world(that's Constructed World) but constructing fictional mythologies, and many mythologies are rooted in religion.
  • June 17, 2012
    nathandoe2016
    ^Okay, a mythopoeia is a mythology, mythologies are generally believed to be fictional, while religion is believed to be real by its practitioners
  • June 17, 2012
    Sligh
    ^ Yes, they did. No Hinduism.

    Also, A Song Of Ice And Fire is an example.
  • June 17, 2012
    Cider
    The New Gods are on the Mythopoeia page. They are believed to be real and worshiped by some in the setting. The Chronicles Of Narnia has a religion dedicated to Tash, and is on the Mythopoeia page. Can you think of any specific examples that would fit on one page but not the other?
  • June 17, 2012
    rodneyAnonymous
    Mythologies are religions that no one believes in anymore.

    If this is supposed to be only gods that are fictional (not fictitious... some people think all gods are fictitious) that should be very explicit. The name alone has a very high potential for offending people.
  • June 18, 2012
    nathandoe2016
    ^^I changed the description, and added a warning so that an offensive flame war will not start.
  • June 18, 2012
    nathandoe2016
    ^^Cider The New Gods aren't actually Gods in the DC Universe they are just SufficientlyAdvancedAliens, while the religion dedicated to Tash is an actual religion believed by the Narnians.
  • June 18, 2012
    rodneyAnonymous
    That is good but I would exclude gods that were really worshiped ever. Under any circumstances Zeus is not an example.
  • June 18, 2012
    nathandoe2016
    ^Well unless he is referenced in a fictional work like Clash Of The Titans, but I get what you are saying no real life examples
  • June 18, 2012
    Arivne
    In the original post's description I have changed the warning to our standard No Real Life Examples Please.

    The original warning was:

    Please do not list religions that are currently practiced today that you do not believe in as that can start an offenisve flame war.

  • June 18, 2012
    rodneyAnonymous
    ^^ No "unless". Jesus is referenced in many fictional works; I don't think that matters. "No RL gods" should have no exceptions.
  • June 19, 2012
    Arivne
    Literature
    • The Lords of the Higher Worlds in Michael Moorcock's Elric Of Melnibone and The Chronicles Of Corum stories. They include the Lords of Chaos (such as Arioch and Xiombarg), The Lords of Law (e.g. Donblas the Justice Maker and Arkyn), the Dead Gods, the Beast-Lords, and Elemental deities such as Grome, Straasha, and Kakatal.

    Tabletop RPG
    • Atlantis: The Lost World generic RPG setting. A number of nations in the setting worshiped the Old Gods: Abbar (rain, harvest), Ash (time, luck and secrets), Atta (strength, ferocity), Eloah (the heavens and the day), Hawwa (the moon and the night), Mana (wisdom), Og (strength, fertility), Sarra (women and feminine virtues), Saha (the wind, freedom), Tama (forests), Tara (men and masculine virtues), Vana (peace and goodness), Xax (death and decay), Za (the underworld).
  • June 20, 2012
    Arivne
    Why do the Laconic and description say that this is limited to TV shows? Shouldn't it cover all media?

    Film
    • Flash Gordon (1980). Emperor Ming worships the great god Dyzan, and the Arborians worship a deity named Arbor.

    Literature
    • JRR Tolkien's The Silmarillion had Eru Iluvatar and the Valar. The Valar included males (Manwe, Ulmo, Aule, Orome, Mandos, Lorien, Tulkas, Melkor/Morgoth) and females (Varda, Yavanna, Nienna, Este, Vaire, Vana and Nessa).

    Tabletop RPG
  • June 20, 2012
    nathandoe2016

  • June 20, 2012
    nathandoe2016
    You can still add examples, but we need to talk about making a better description, and what picture we should use. Also, I'm lazy so could someone please organize the examples by media please? In alphabetical order? :)
  • June 21, 2012
    captainsandwich
    dungeons and dragons is put down twice the dungeons and dragons entries need to be fused.
  • June 22, 2012
    elwoz
    Narnia shouldn't be on here at all: just as Aslan is Jesus (the official one, not the crystal dragon one), Tash is the Christian Devil.
  • June 22, 2012
    randomsurfer
    On Gor most people acknowlege (if not worship) the Priest-Kings as gods, but they've never seen one - which is good, because they're 20 foot tall locusts.
  • June 23, 2012
    rodneyAnonymous
    ^^ Agree that Narnia gods are thiny-veiled Christian deities. Not even veiled, really: Aslan is explicitly Jesus in a different universe.
  • June 24, 2012
    nathandoe2016
    ^I changed it from Tash to Aslan is that better?
  • June 24, 2012
    nathandoe2016
    Can anyone suggest a better title?
  • June 24, 2012
    elwoz
    ^^ No, you should take Narnia out of the examples altogether, because that's not a fictional religion, it's Christianity with the names changed.

    You could then perhaps mention it in the description as an example of something that's just barely on the not-an-example side of the line; rather a lot of people (me included) had no idea Aslan was Jesus until years after we read the books.
  • June 25, 2012
    Arivne
    Literature
    • Robert E Howard's Conan stories. Some of the deities in the stories were from Real Life, such as Set, Mannannan (Mac Lir), Erlik, Ymir and several Hindu deities. However, some of them were fictional, such as Mitra, Crom, Hothath, Valka, Pteor, the spider god of Yezud, Bel the god of thieves, Jullah and the Golden Peacock. There's a list of them here.
    • HP Lovecraft's Cthulhu Mythos had a number of deities, such as Azathoth, Yog-Sothoth, Shub-Niggurath, Nyarlathotep, Ghatanothoa, Yig, Cthulhu and Hastur.

    While researching the above examples I discovered that The Other Wiki has a page with a List of deities in fiction, with all the examples you could want. Note that some of them are from Real Life and don't count for this trope.
  • June 25, 2012
    nathandoe2016
    ^^I took out Narnia so there will be no complications and thank-you Arivne
  • June 25, 2012
    nathandoe2016

  • June 25, 2012
    DarkConfidant
    In the Magic The Gathering plane of Zendikar, the Merfolk worship the pantheon of Emeria, Cosi, and Ula, with the Kor worshiping similar gods by a different name. It turns out that these "gods" are really the Ancient Eldrazi Progenitors, Emrakul, Kozilek, and Ulamog.
  • June 25, 2012
    nathandoe2016

  • June 25, 2012
    dalek955
    We already have this. Our Gods Are Greater.

    By the way, nathandoe, I do NOT appreciate you editing out my posts. Doubleplusuncool.
  • June 26, 2012
    Arivne
    ^ Our Gods Are Greater is about criteria used to distinguish deities from each other. It is not limited to deities that are created or adapted by an author to appear in a story, which is what this trope is. In fact there's a whole section (Religion & Mythology) with Real Life deities, which are forbidden in this trope.
  • June 26, 2012
    dalek955
    Yes, but it also serves as a list, just like all the other Our X Are Different tropes do. Having another list and then saying "no RL ones, even though tons of fictions use them" is pointless. Everything you would come here to find is already covered there.
  • June 26, 2012
    nathandoe2016
    ^Sorry 'bout that just didn't want all of our hard work on this YKTTW to go to waste, also the YKTTW stays!
  • June 27, 2012
    dalek955
    If a YKTTW is unnecessary, you can't protect it by deleting comments that say so. Even if you could, hiding other people's opinions like that is a dishonest and childish tactic. As a troper, you should be better than that.
  • June 29, 2012
    nathandoe2016
    well the trope is not unnecessary, but you seem like you want it gone
  • June 30, 2012
    Koveras
    ^^ Not really, no. She is mostly just there as part of Neviril's Back Story.
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