History ZergRush / RealLife

18th Feb '17 4:06:13 AM leonardd
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*** Even in tank to tank battles, the trope was actually played straight quite often, although not necessarily the way people think. The standard practice for US tankers from D-Day onward was to not attack German panzers unless assured of at least 5-to-1 numerical advantage (not necessarily the oft-quoted loss of 5 Shermans for every Panther, which is a misreporting of this rule of thumb). Even on the German side, however, panzermen felt that at least 3 to 1 local advantage in numbers was necessary for even allegedly superior German Panthers to successfully attack defending T-34s or Shermans, so great was the defensive power of the tanks in general. Almost every instance in 1943 or later where German panzers attacked Allied tanks without at least 2.5 to 1 local advantage was beaten back.
10th Feb '17 4:15:32 PM AltoonaMan
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** On social media sites such as {{Twitter}}, {{Facebook}}, and YouTube this is known as dogpiling. Exploited by people with a large following who want to use their fans as their PersonalArmy to attack people with smaller followings to bully them into silence. The actions of these fans can range from hurling insults to doc-tropping and death threats against family members.

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** On social media sites such as {{Twitter}}, {{Facebook}}, and YouTube this is known as dogpiling. Exploited by people with a large following who want to use their fans as their PersonalArmy personal army to attack people with smaller followings to bully them into silence. The actions of these fans can range from hurling insults to doc-tropping doc-dropping and death threats against family members.members.
*** Do this too often and you risk a counterattack, the zerg rush of dogpiling fans merely becomess seen as a weapon of choice, and the people you initiated this on may band together to do it to you in retaliation en masse. For example, popular antifeminist channels are known for sending their fans after small channels who make videos on feminism. Eventually these small channels have had enough and have decided to call out these larger channels and continue to do so. A few of these large YouTube channels have been suspended as a result.
21st Jan '17 12:29:50 PM AltoonaMan
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Added DiffLines:

** On social media sites such as {{Twitter}}, {{Facebook}}, and YouTube this is known as dogpiling. Exploited by people with a large following who want to use their fans as their PersonalArmy to attack people with smaller followings to bully them into silence. The actions of these fans can range from hurling insults to doc-tropping and death threats against family members.
29th Dec '16 5:33:52 AM Morgenthaler
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*** Zig-zagged with the Chinese military during the KoreanWar, and indeed, with many armed forces supposedly using "human wave" tactics. They may be given to WeHaveReserves mentality due to relative scarcity of high tech equipment and large numerical advantage, but trained manpower is not easily replaceable and even low-tech, high-manpower forces tend to rely on skills and tactics except under most dire conditions. A US marine during the KoreanWar supposedly quipped, "how many squads of Chinese make up a human wave?"

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*** Zig-zagged with the Chinese military during the KoreanWar, UsefulNotes/KoreanWar, and indeed, with many armed forces supposedly using "human wave" tactics. They may be given to WeHaveReserves mentality due to relative scarcity of high tech equipment and large numerical advantage, but trained manpower is not easily replaceable and even low-tech, high-manpower forces tend to rely on skills and tactics except under most dire conditions. A US marine during the KoreanWar Korean War supposedly quipped, "how many squads of Chinese make up a human wave?"
18th Dec '16 4:18:31 PM Ferot_Dreadnaught
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** Although the Parachute Regiment fought a battle, uphill, in the dark, against enemies in fixed positions at 2:3 odds - ''and won'' - at Goose Green in the Falklands War, this was due to necessity and under-estimating Argentinian numbers. But if the Paras had known in advance, [[{{Badass}} it probably wouldn't have fazed them anyway]].

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** Although the Parachute Regiment fought a battle, uphill, in the dark, against enemies in fixed positions at 2:3 odds - ''and won'' - at Goose Green in the Falklands War, this was due to necessity and under-estimating Argentinian numbers. But if the Paras had known in advance, [[{{Badass}} it probably wouldn't have fazed them anyway]].anyway.
23rd Nov '16 11:04:09 PM VutherA
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* Highland Charges in the 17th and 18th century. Unlike what happened in Braveheart, traditional Scottish tactics called for tight and disciplined blocks of infantry. When newer firearms made those tactics obsolete they switched to a screaming charge at the enemy line, which was extremely successful when their enemies would break ranks. When other armies started training their armies to defend against them, they got massacred.
** Other factors, such as improved firearm drill, the invention of the bayonet and canister shot, also made the strategy obsolete.

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* Highland Charges in the 17th and 18th century. Unlike what happened in Braveheart, traditional Scottish tactics called for tight and disciplined blocks of infantry. When newer firearms made those tactics obsolete obsolete, they switched to long lines no deeper four ranks which would advance to musket range (around 50-60 yards), fire off a volley, drop to the ground in expectation of a return volley, and then abandon their guns while using the musket smoke as cover to make a screaming charge at the enemy line, which was aided by the use of targes with one-handed swords/dirks to deflect bayonets and extremely successful when their enemies would quickly break ranks. When other armies started training their armies to defend against them, they got massacred.
** Other factors, such as improved firearm drill, the invention of the ring bayonet (which was always attached unlike the earlier plug bayonet which had to be mounted as needed because it went into a gun's barrel and prevented it from firing) and canister shot, also made the strategy obsolete.
29th Oct '16 11:40:53 PM KaijuDirectorOO7
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Added DiffLines:

** There is also a joke where a German commander once said that "One Tiger was equal to ten Shermans." He quickly followed it up with, "But you [the Americans] always have eleven!"
21st Oct '16 3:47:22 PM SmoCro
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**** There are indications that Human wave attacks, especially as applied by Asian forces, seem to have been more akin to infiltration tactics than the western world war I-vintage human wave attack. Chinese forces seem to have infiltrated very close to the American perimeter and than attacked the last meters in a massive wave overwhelming the defenders.
20th Oct '16 10:24:29 AM Morgenthaler
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* The Japanese used Banzai charges to great effect in China during the Second Sino-Japanese war, even against fully-alerted, unbroken infantry. But then, the Chinese were poorly trained and poorly supplied, easily scared off with the bayonet. The Chinese troops (from [[NoMoreEmperors the Guomindang, Guominjun, Guangxi Clique, and Yunnan]]) seldom had artillery, machine guns, mortars, or barbed wire; they had no aircraft; they could [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Defense_of_the_Great_Wall count themselves lucky]] if they had bolt-action rifles and a literal handful of ammunition. [[note]]A Chinese folk song praises the virtues of fighting a rich enemy; its first verse begins, "No guns, no cannons, but only what the enemy provides us." By the late war, most Chinese equipment was captured from the Japanese -- not just rifles, artillery, and ammunition, but helmets, combat webbing, and even shoes. This led to friendly-fire incidents, but even that was better than trying to fight barefoot with bamboo spears...[[/note]] But the US was as well-equipped relative to Japan as the Japanese were relative to China; at the Battle of the Coral Sea, the US would have more surface ships than the Japanese had aircraft, and infantry were equipped to match. (US infantry also carried a semi-automatic rifle, the M1 Garand; both China and Japan still used bolt-action rifles with small magazines.) So, while US troops feared banzai charges as demoralizing and unsettling, they weren't particularly vulnerable to them; the failed charge at Henderson Field was [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Banzai_charge the first of many]]. But Japanese commanders falsely claimed that the tactic still worked, [[AttackAttackAttack meaning that it stuck around until 1944]].

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* The Japanese used Banzai charges to great effect in China during the Second Sino-Japanese war, even against fully-alerted, unbroken infantry. But then, the Chinese were poorly trained and poorly supplied, easily scared off with the bayonet. The Chinese troops (from [[NoMoreEmperors [[UsefulNotes/NoMoreEmperors the Guomindang, Guominjun, Guangxi Clique, and Yunnan]]) seldom had artillery, machine guns, mortars, or barbed wire; they had no aircraft; they could [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Defense_of_the_Great_Wall count themselves lucky]] if they had bolt-action rifles and a literal handful of ammunition. [[note]]A Chinese folk song praises the virtues of fighting a rich enemy; its first verse begins, "No guns, no cannons, but only what the enemy provides us." By the late war, most Chinese equipment was captured from the Japanese -- not just rifles, artillery, and ammunition, but helmets, combat webbing, and even shoes. This led to friendly-fire incidents, but even that was better than trying to fight barefoot with bamboo spears...[[/note]] But the US was as well-equipped relative to Japan as the Japanese were relative to China; at the Battle of the Coral Sea, the US would have more surface ships than the Japanese had aircraft, and infantry were equipped to match. (US infantry also carried a semi-automatic rifle, the M1 Garand; both China and Japan still used bolt-action rifles with small magazines.) So, while US troops feared banzai charges as demoralizing and unsettling, they weren't particularly vulnerable to them; the failed charge at Henderson Field was [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Banzai_charge the first of many]]. But Japanese commanders falsely claimed that the tactic still worked, [[AttackAttackAttack meaning that it stuck around until 1944]].
9th Oct '16 6:20:43 PM MrCandle
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