History YMMV / YouTube

18th Jul '16 2:53:56 AM SammyDragon92
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** In fact, it might just be wise to not state any kind of opinion on any topic at all because YouTube commenters tend to be an incredibly volatile bunch...
10th Jul '16 10:10:00 AM Bassman
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** In 2011-2012, there was a troll war (or if you made TV mocks a mock reviewer war), where trolls and users fought (in communities like the Barney Bunch, the Emergency Alert System fanbase, and other fanbases and groups) and for people who made TV mocks, mock reviewers "reviewed" mocks and fought with the makers. Fast forward to 2016, and '''almost nobody''' remembers it, as if nothing happened.


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* GettingCrapPastTheRadar: [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eKkt_QzbY0w This video]] has been on YouTube '''since 2013''' and '''no one''' has flagged it yet. Listing hate of the LGBT community on YouTube would take days.
7th Jul '16 4:07:43 PM HighCrate
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* TheyJustDidntCare:
** Though Google is easily a pioneer of technology and the internet, their management of [=YouTube=] has been less than satisfactory, to say the least. The Google+ integration is probably the worst offender.
** Google ''claims'' that it's ''our'' feedback that they base all of their major changes on (ala, each new channel update, each new homepage update, Google+, et al.), however, if that were really the case, they wouldn't have forced half of these updates on us, because roughly 99% of the feedback regarding these updates are negative and critical: it's ''very'' clear that Google only pays attention to the 1% positive feedback they receive. In fact, many's a user that ended up with their accounts being terminated, and their content removed for negative feedback.
** YouTube's copyright structure just screams this as all someone has to do is falsely flag videos to claim monetization over them or knock the video offline in certain countries[=/=]everywhere. Those flagged have little recourse [[https://www.eff.org/issues/intellectual-property/guide-to-youtube-removals as laid out by the EFF here]]. There have been instances where entire channels have been deleted by false strikes and yet [=YouTube=] does little about its copyright enforcement system outside trying to avoid being sued by copyright holders. What's worse is big media corporations using the broken copyright structure as a tool for stomping out Fair Use, since such things as satire and criticism of their work are seen as threats to their profits, reputations, and feelings, in addition to apparently viewing Fair Use as legalized piracy.
** Also, there have been cases where the original uploader/creator got their video removed after someone who copied it and uploaded it complained. Never mind that it's pretty clear by the upload date which version was first.
** It doesn't apply to just copyright strikes. Community Violations are just as bad, if not worse than Youtube's Copyright System. All they do is flag a video for violating the community guidelines, and the video gets removed with the user having no idea just ''why'' the video got removed. If they managed to get an answer beyond "it was removed", like having someone with a deep connection to Youtube get them to fess up, they'd probably find that their video got removed for something completely ''unrelated'' to the video in question. Want an example? [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uiuKWM8nqxw A Pokemon video about Lavender Town and Myths got removed because it had "Spam"]]. After that, Youtube can just stay quiet about why they removed the video, not caring if the user wants more info on what exactly they considered "Spam".
** Ever since the Google+ integration, the button to thumb down a comment has stopped working since Google+ has no such feature. Instead of removing the button from YouTube, they've decided to keep it for whatever reason.
** It had become pretty clear that since about early-to-mid 2013, tags weren't working properly anymore (unless you're a partner channel) in that no matter what tags or keywords you added to your video, it still would not show up in the search results. As the summer of 2014, [=YouTube=] had actually ''finally'' announced (or, rather, ''admitted'') that they retired tags.
25th Jun '16 7:27:28 AM Psyga315
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* ScrappyMechanic:
** The way videos buffer is a '''pain in the ass'''. If you seek back to a part of the video you already buffered, whatever you buffered is lost and the entire video from that point has to rebuffer again. This is due to what's called [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dynamic_Adaptive_Streaming_over_HTTP "Dash playback"]]. Previously, [=YouTube=] used to allow everyone to buffer the whole video, so it was possible for those with slower connections to start buffering a video they want to watch (especially at higher qualities) and then come back later when it's done or near-done buffering. Then in more recent years, Google switched over to DASH, which causes the videos to buffer in chunks of about one minute, rather than allowing users to cache the whole buffer on their systems. This does not work out for everyone, especially those with slower connections, and for a while people were trying to figure out how to fix this issue. Then in 2013, an extension called "[[https://github.com/YePpHa/YouTubeCenter YouTube Center]]" received coverage around various tech websites. It received such attention because it finally provided [=YouTube=] users a way to disable "Dash playback", meaning that people could once again buffer whole [=YouTube=] videos and seek anywhere they want without having to rebuffer again. However, Google then later switched up their quality systems, which caused two important quality settings (480p and 1080p), as well as the later-introduced 60 FPS support, to be disabled if a user has managed to disable DASH, whether they're using the extension or not. So basically, it's like Google is saying, "Go back to Dash playback or else."
** Ads that buffer. Most of the time, the countdown needed to skip them doesn't decrease while they buffer. ''[[FlatWhat What.]]''
** Video size and quality options just never seem to stick. It doesn't matter if you have a computer capable of playing videos at large size and 1080p, [=YouTube=] WILL force your videos back to small size and 144p after some time has passed.
** The new Google+ comment integration can be seen as this. See "They Changed It, Now It Sucks" below.
** The "Recommended For You" system either suggests random videos with no explanation for ''why'' it thinks you're interested in them, or it's massively redundant and suggests videos you've already watched, are from people you've subscribed to, and even ''your own videos''. Sometimes it even links you to videos that ''outright bash things you like / like to watch''. This goes for the so-called "popular channels you might like" areas, too. As of December 2014, they brought back the option to remove these listings either individually or by channel, depending on where it appears. In addition, the recommendation system seems unusually sensitive to certain things, like a channel's popularity or whether or not they're a partner, as clicking on one video from a channel like this, even if you turn out not to like it and click out of it after 30 seconds, will earn it a permanent spot in your recommended list. Sometimes even '''blocking''' the channel in question won't stop it from recommending it. The worst part? The current model of [=YouTube=] does not provide any kind of option to turn this feature off aside from hitting the "Not interested" X (which often doesn't work anyway) or wiping and pausing your search history.
** If you've posted videos longer than 15 minutes, [=YouTube=] will freeze the view count on those videos, citing that view counts update only when the video is viewed in its entirety.
** Viewing a video via a channel's playlist or, more frequently, through a channel's Videos page (taking the viewer to an Uploads "playlist"), automatically turns on Autoplay ''every single time''. This feature, which automatically changed the video page to the next video, has been said to interrupt anything people usually do when a video ends, and sometimes clicking the Autoplay button once doesn't turn it off properly.
*** As of mid-December 2014, clicking an upload through a user channel no longer places it in an autoplaying Uploads "playlist".
*** However, ''there's no longer an option to turn off autoplay'' should you click on a video through a playlist. The same icon now represents 'repeat playlist', which means Autoplay is now ''forced'' on the playlist, whether the viewer wants it or not. (And, usually, it's ''not''.) Just another reason to rearrange the URL so that the "v=" part is after the ? mark and then get rid of everything after the & sign in the URL when copying it.
*** On the subject of autoplay, YouTube had been playing with an autoplay feature off and on for several months where no matter what video you watch - even outside of a playlist - the first video in the list of suggested/recommended videos on the right side of the page automatically begins playing after you finish watching your current video. As of February 2015, this is now, unfortunately, a permanent feature. It's switchable, yes, but having to remember to click the tiny blue switch when using another computer is off-putting.
** The ''one'' time YouTube actually added a ''useful'' feature just disappeared and was never heard of again just shortly after it was introduced. The feature? Pop-out video player - you could open the video you were currently watching into its own separate window that was just the video player itself.
** The fact that a video's popularity is now dependent on minutes watched. As in, how many minutes of the video people watch, instead of views alone. While this was implemented in response to people who solicited views via clickbait reply videos (i.e. Reply Girls, who attract views by making reply videos with their cleavage in the thumbnails), this has actually put a huge damper on sketch videos & animations that usually last five minutes at most. As Ross O'Donovan of ''[[WebVideo/GameGrumps Steam Train]]'' [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gi6FcI2wFrw points out]], this has pretty much killed independent sketches & animation on YouTube in favor of 10-minute gaming & review videos (note that he isn't trying to bash those kinds of videos; he's mainly showing concern for how shorter videos such as independent animations are becoming overshadowed due to this new system).
** [=YouTube=]'s horribly flawed copyright and Content ID systems, which exists as a broken mess that lingers over reviewers' and people whose channels rely on media such as film and video games' heads, as it's shockingly easy for videos to be hit with copyright strikes and Content ID, which could lead to, among other things:
*** Monetization being removed,
*** Age-restriction being turned on,
*** The video or even the ''channel itself'' being taken down,
*** Users possibly getting slapped with a lawsuit from corporations for copyright infringement.
** Simply put, the system is being [[CorruptCorporateExecutive abused by media corporations as a tool to force everyone to pay for such things as DVD boxsets of television series and removing anything that could tarnish their reputation, such as satire and criticism, since this leads to a weaker bottom line.]] As many creators note when things are starting to get back to normal, they ''had'' to make videos describing the struggle with getting rid of copyright problems, as the system [=YouTube=] has in place to resolve this [[IncompetenceInc is so staggeringly slow, unresponsive and unreliable]], that creators feel no choice but to make their problems public and escalate what happened so that YouTube's hand will (hopefully) be forced and they can start fixing what's wrong. It's to the point where [[https://youtu.be/UiI3Mu-a2T0?t=6m23s one such person]] directly compares the solution to a [[InternetCounterattack "4chan hate-bombing"]].

to:

* ScrappyMechanic:
** The way videos buffer is
ScrappyMechanic: [[ScrappyMechanic/YouTube There's a '''pain in the ass'''. If you seek back to a part of the video you already buffered, whatever you buffered is lost and the entire video from that point has to rebuffer again. This is due to what's called [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dynamic_Adaptive_Streaming_over_HTTP "Dash playback"]]. Previously, [=YouTube=] used to allow everyone to buffer the whole video, so it was possible for those with slower connections to start buffering a video they want to watch (especially at higher qualities) and then come back later when it's done or near-done buffering. Then in more recent years, Google switched over to DASH, which causes the videos to buffer in chunks bunch of about one minute, rather than allowing users to cache the whole buffer on their systems. This does not work out for everyone, especially those with slower connections, and for a while people were trying to figure out how to fix this issue. Then in 2013, an extension called "[[https://github.com/YePpHa/YouTubeCenter YouTube Center]]" received coverage around various tech websites. It received such attention because it finally provided [=YouTube=] users a way to disable "Dash playback", meaning them. So much, that people could once again buffer whole [=YouTube=] videos and seek anywhere they want without having to rebuffer again. However, Google then later switched up their quality systems, which caused two important quality settings (480p and 1080p), as well as the later-introduced 60 FPS support, to be disabled if a user has managed to disable DASH, whether they're using the extension or not. So basically, it's like Google is saying, "Go back to Dash playback or else."
** Ads that buffer. Most of the time, the countdown needed to skip them doesn't decrease while they buffer. ''[[FlatWhat What.]]''
** Video size and quality options just never seem to stick. It doesn't matter if you have a computer capable of playing videos at large size and 1080p, [=YouTube=] WILL force your videos back to small size and 144p after some time has passed.
** The new Google+ comment integration can be seen as this. See "They Changed It, Now It Sucks" below.
** The "Recommended For You" system either suggests random videos with no explanation for ''why''
it thinks you're interested in them, or it's massively redundant and suggests videos you've already watched, are from people you've subscribed to, and even ''your own videos''. Sometimes it even links you to videos that ''outright bash things you like / like to watch''. This goes for the so-called "popular channels you might like" areas, too. As of December 2014, they brought back the option to remove these listings either individually or by channel, depending on where it appears. In addition, the recommendation system seems unusually sensitive to certain things, like a channel's popularity or whether or not they're a partner, as clicking on one video from a channel like this, even if you turn out not to like it and click out of it after 30 seconds, will earn it a permanent spot in your recommended list. Sometimes even '''blocking''' the channel in question won't stop it from recommending it. The worst part? The current model of [=YouTube=] does not provide any kind of option to turn this feature off aside from hitting the "Not interested" X (which often doesn't work anyway) or wiping and pausing your search history.
** If you've posted videos longer than 15 minutes, [=YouTube=] will freeze the view count on those videos, citing that view counts update only when the video is viewed in its entirety.
** Viewing a video via a channel's playlist or, more frequently, through a channel's Videos page (taking the viewer to an Uploads "playlist"), automatically turns on Autoplay ''every single time''. This feature, which automatically changed the video page to the next video, has been said to interrupt anything people usually do when a video ends, and sometimes clicking the Autoplay button once doesn't turn it off properly.
*** As of mid-December 2014, clicking an upload through a user channel no longer places it in an autoplaying Uploads "playlist".
*** However, ''there's no longer an option to turn off autoplay'' should you click on a video through a playlist. The same icon now represents 'repeat playlist', which means Autoplay is now ''forced'' on the playlist, whether the viewer wants it or not. (And, usually, it's ''not''.) Just another reason to rearrange the URL so that the "v=" part is after the ? mark and then get rid of everything after the & sign in the URL when copying it.
*** On the subject of autoplay, YouTube had been playing with an autoplay feature off and on for several months where no matter what video you watch - even outside of a playlist - the first video in the list of suggested/recommended videos on the right side of the page automatically begins playing after you finish watching your current video. As of February 2015, this is now, unfortunately, a permanent feature. It's switchable, yes, but having to remember to click the tiny blue switch when using another computer is off-putting.
** The ''one'' time YouTube actually added a ''useful'' feature just disappeared and was never heard of again just shortly after it was introduced. The feature? Pop-out video player - you could open the video you were currently watching into
warrants its own separate window that was just the video player itself.
** The fact that a video's popularity is now dependent on minutes watched. As in, how many minutes of the video people watch, instead of views alone. While this was implemented in response to people who solicited views via clickbait reply videos (i.e. Reply Girls, who attract views by making reply videos with their cleavage in the thumbnails), this has actually put a huge damper on sketch videos & animations that usually last five minutes at most. As Ross O'Donovan of ''[[WebVideo/GameGrumps Steam Train]]'' [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Gi6FcI2wFrw points out]], this has pretty much killed independent sketches & animation on YouTube in favor of 10-minute gaming & review videos (note that he isn't trying to bash those kinds of videos; he's mainly showing concern for how shorter videos such as independent animations are becoming overshadowed due to this new system).
** [=YouTube=]'s horribly flawed copyright and Content ID systems, which exists as a broken mess that lingers over reviewers' and people whose channels rely on media such as film and video games' heads, as it's shockingly easy for videos to be hit with copyright strikes and Content ID, which could lead to, among other things:
*** Monetization being removed,
*** Age-restriction being turned on,
*** The video or even the ''channel itself'' being taken down,
*** Users possibly getting slapped with a lawsuit from corporations for copyright infringement.
** Simply put, the system is being [[CorruptCorporateExecutive abused by media corporations as a tool to force everyone to pay for such things as DVD boxsets of television series and removing anything that could tarnish their reputation, such as satire and criticism, since this leads to a weaker bottom line.]] As many creators note when things are starting to get back to normal, they ''had'' to make videos describing the struggle with getting rid of copyright problems, as the system [=YouTube=] has in place to resolve this [[IncompetenceInc is so staggeringly slow, unresponsive and unreliable]], that creators feel no choice but to make their problems public and escalate what happened so that YouTube's hand will (hopefully) be forced and they can start fixing what's wrong. It's to the point where [[https://youtu.be/UiI3Mu-a2T0?t=6m23s one such person]] directly compares the solution to a [[InternetCounterattack "4chan hate-bombing"]].
page.]]
22nd Jun '16 8:51:36 PM BNSF1995
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** YouTube's copyright structure just screams this as all someone has to do is falsely flag videos to claim monetization over them or knock the video offline in certain countries[=/=]everywhere. Those flagged have little recourse [[https://www.eff.org/issues/intellectual-property/guide-to-youtube-removals as laid out by the EFF here]]. There have been instances where entire channels have been deleted by false strikes and yet [=YouTube=] does little about its copyright enforcement system outside trying to avoid being sued by copyright holders. What's worse is big media corporations using the broken copyright structure as a tool for stomping out Fair Use, since such things as satire and criticism of their work could potentially lead to them making less money.

to:

** YouTube's copyright structure just screams this as all someone has to do is falsely flag videos to claim monetization over them or knock the video offline in certain countries[=/=]everywhere. Those flagged have little recourse [[https://www.eff.org/issues/intellectual-property/guide-to-youtube-removals as laid out by the EFF here]]. There have been instances where entire channels have been deleted by false strikes and yet [=YouTube=] does little about its copyright enforcement system outside trying to avoid being sued by copyright holders. What's worse is big media corporations using the broken copyright structure as a tool for stomping out Fair Use, since such things as satire and criticism of their work could potentially lead are seen as threats to them making less money.their profits, reputations, and feelings, in addition to apparently viewing Fair Use as legalized piracy.
1st Jun '16 10:45:25 AM DavidDelony
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* AuthorsSavingThrow: In 2015, [=YouTube=] dropped the deeply unpopular policy of requiring a Google+ account to comment.
29th May '16 7:45:20 AM mlsmithca
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* AndTheFandomRejoiced: People were estatic when [=Youtube=] and Google were '''finally''' ending their partnership. Considering how much Google began to control of the site and enforcing [[TheScrappy Google +]] into it's mechanics, this is a silver lining.
** When the Content ID system was fixed so that money from a claimed video would be stored, and then given to the winner of the claim when the claim had been disputed.
28th May '16 1:14:16 PM MisterApple
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* AndThereWasMuchRejoicing: People were estatic when [=Youtube=] and Google were '''finally''' ending their partnership. Considering how much Google began to control of the site and enforcing [[TheScrappy Google +]] into it's mechanics, this is a silver lining.

to:

* AndThereWasMuchRejoicing: AndTheFandomRejoiced: People were estatic when [=Youtube=] and Google were '''finally''' ending their partnership. Considering how much Google began to control of the site and enforcing [[TheScrappy Google +]] into it's mechanics, this is a silver lining.lining.
**When the Content ID system was fixed so that money from a claimed video would be stored, and then given to the winner of the claim when the claim had been disputed.



** [=Youtube=] commentors, and to some extent, [=Youtube=] itself due to the number of changes (for good or [[TheyChangedItNowItSucks ill]]).

to:

** [=Youtube=] commentors, commenters, and to some extent, [=Youtube=] itself due to the number of changes (for good or [[TheyChangedItNowItSucks ill]]).



** False copyright strikes or even ''automated'' copyright strikes are a surefire way to raise a stink. Two such examples include the controversy regarding /VideoGame/DayOneGarrysIncident and WebVideo/TheNostalgiaCritic launching a "Where's the Fair Use" movement directly calling out [=YouTube=] for exactly this.

to:

** False copyright strikes or even ''automated'' copyright strikes are a surefire way to raise a stink. Two such examples include the controversy regarding /VideoGame/DayOneGarrysIncident VideoGame/DayOneGarrysIncident and WebVideo/TheNostalgiaCritic launching a "Where's the Fair Use" movement directly calling out [=YouTube=] for exactly this.
24th May '16 3:48:00 PM BNSF1995
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Added DiffLines:

*** More and more, users are now coming to believe that the Copyright ID system was created specifically to cater to the big media corporations, who seem to view Fair Use as legalized piracy, and also see reviews and parodies as threats to their reputation and profits.
28th Apr '16 11:31:34 AM StoneBasilisk
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* FlameWar: You can locate them on almost ''every'' video. Some span over weeks, months, or ''years'' if someone replies to an age old comment.

to:

* FlameWar: You can locate them on almost ''every'' video. Some span over weeks, months, or even ''years'' [[ThreadNecromancer if someone replies to an age old comment.age-old comment]].
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=YMMV.YouTube