History YMMV / WheelOfFortune

10th Aug '16 5:12:10 PM Anddrix
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** A particularly egregious example is the Prize Puzzle, which merely requires the player to ''solve the puzzle'' to win. The value of the prize is at least $6,000, and like other prizes, counts towards the player's score. In fact, it's become a ''very'' BoringButPractical strategy for players to solve a Prize Puzzle with zero money even if there are several letters left on the board because the prize is worth so much that any money earned by spinning at that point is too inconsequential in comparison to risk hitting a Bankrupt/Lose A Turn and giving the round (and, more importantly, the prize) to another player. It's such a huge Game Breaker that the only ways for a player to win it and lose the game is either to be flat-out ''awful'' during the rest of the game, to fall victim to a [[GoldenSnitch $6,000 Final Spin]], or for it to be cancelled out by another player getting a ''different'' Game Breaker...which, unlike the Prize Puzzle, all require a specific space to be landed on and are vulnerable to Bankrupt. Getting one of the above ''and'' the Prize Puzzle basically turns the game into a CurbStompBattle for that contestant, rendering future rounds pointless since by that stage the results are a ForegoneConclusion. With the introduction on the $1,000 Express space (more on that below), the game basically became "Win Round 3 or Lose", and the fans have [[BaseBreaker certainly noticed]].

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** A particularly egregious example is the Prize Puzzle, which merely requires the player to ''solve the puzzle'' to win. The value of the prize is at least $6,000, and like other prizes, counts towards the player's score. In fact, it's become a ''very'' BoringButPractical strategy for players to solve a Prize Puzzle with zero money even if there are several letters left on the board because the prize is worth so much that any money earned by spinning at that point is too inconsequential in comparison to risk hitting a Bankrupt/Lose A Turn and giving the round (and, more importantly, the prize) to another player. It's such a huge Game Breaker that the only ways for a player to win it and lose the game is either to be flat-out ''awful'' during the rest of the game, to fall victim to a [[GoldenSnitch $6,000 Final Spin]], or for it to be cancelled out by another player getting a ''different'' Game Breaker...which, unlike the Prize Puzzle, all require a specific space to be landed on and are vulnerable to Bankrupt. Getting one of the above ''and'' the Prize Puzzle basically turns the game into a CurbStompBattle for that contestant, rendering future rounds pointless since by that stage the results are a ForegoneConclusion. With the introduction on the $1,000 Express space (more on that below), the game basically became "Win Round 3 or Lose", and the fans have [[BaseBreaker certainly noticed]].noticed.
29th Jul '16 2:43:39 PM Twentington
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* TwoDecadesBehind: The introduction of the monitor-based puzzle board in 1997 was seen as a welcome change for fans who thought the old trilon-based one made the show look obsolete.
* WereStillRelevantDammit: The 33rd season (started in fall 2015) is promoted with Orleans's song "Still the One and clips intended to show that Sajak and White have "{{still got it}}."

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* TwoDecadesBehind: The introduction of the monitor-based puzzle board in 1997 was seen as a welcome change for fans who thought the old trilon-based one made the show look obsolete.
* WereStillRelevantDammit: The 33rd season (started in fall 2015) is promoted with Orleans's song "Still the One One" and clips intended to show that Sajak and White have "{{still got it}}."
7th Jul '16 5:43:22 PM HighCrate
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* TheyJustDidntCare:
** An incident from the October 8, 1992 episode. The puzzle MARILYN MONROE'S LAST FILM has just been solved by the red contestant and since it's a Clue puzzle, naming said film will award $500. He says ''Something's Got to Give'', which was indeed Monroe's last film, only to be ruled incorrect. The yellow player says ''The Misfits'', and is given the $500. Coming back from break, Pat acknowledges that the red player named the last film Monroe ''worked on'', then claims the puzzle was implying her last ''completed'' film (which the yellow contestant gave). [[StealthPun Fortunately]], the error doesn't affect the outcome - the final scores are $5,200, $1,500, and $8,650.
** ''Wheel 2000'' has this egregious example. On the October 4, 1997 episode, the blue player calls the last consonant in the Speed-Up puzzle GOOSE BUMPS. At this point, a signal should play to tell the contestants that only vowels remain. However, no such notification is given until ''after'' the red player picks a (nonexistent) consonant, at which point Lucy says "There's only vowels left, I believe." before the yellow contestant's turn. That player picks the O's and solves for 550 points, making the final scores 1,550, 550, and 1,900. Unlike the above example, this ''did'' end up affecting the outcome of the game. On a successful solve worth 750 points, the red contestant would've had enough to go to the Bonus Round.
** On December 20, 2012, the day after a contestant was penalized for neglecting the G in the puzzle SEVEN SWANS A-SWIMMING, the blue contestant missolves HICKORY-SMOKED COUNTRY HAM ''without the D''. Neither the judges nor Pat notice this, and it is treated as a successful solve. Luckily, this error doesn't affect the outcome as the final scores are $11,950, $1,500, and $8,000. Also luckily, almost nobody notices the error since they're still on the show about the previous day's judging call...[[FridgeLogic which might have been the point]].
** Season 30 saw Fictional Character(s) being renamed to simply Character(s). While the reasoning was sound (to properly categorize characters people thought were real, such as mythological figures), the execution was half-assed - due to OutOfOrder taping, the last instances of "Fictional" slipped past after the name change, as did any instance of an older bonus puzzle being shown as a bumper. Also, as of Season 32, the category graphic for Character(s) ''still'' does not match the font of the other category names.
23rd Jun '16 6:38:44 PM KoopaKid17
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* CreatorsPet: The Prize Puzzle. The show has warmed up to it but fans certainly haven't (mentioned in TheScrappy below). Introduced in Season 21, Prize Puzzles originally occurred weekly. Two seasons later, they started occurring daily. Since its introduction, many popular elements have been retired ostensibly to make room for it, such as the Jackpot Round, the bonus categories and the Free Spin (replaced by the Free Play wedge). It doesn't help that the Prize Puzzle is ''never'' affected by budget cuts whenever the show makes them.

to:

* CreatorsPet: The Prize Puzzle. The show has warmed up to it but fans certainly haven't (mentioned (evidenced by its entry in TheScrappy below). Introduced in Season 21, Prize Puzzles originally occurred weekly. Two seasons later, they started occurring daily. Since its introduction, many popular elements have been retired ostensibly to make room for it, such as the Jackpot Round, the bonus categories and the Free Spin (replaced by the Free Play wedge). It doesn't help that the Prize Puzzle is ''never'' affected by budget cuts whenever the show makes them.
23rd Jun '16 6:38:12 PM KoopaKid17
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* CreatorsPet: The Prize Puzzle. Introduced in Season 21, they originally occurred weekly. Two seasons later, they started occurring daily. Since its introduction, many popular elements have been retired ostensibly to make room for it, such as the Jackpot Round, the bonus categories and the Free Spin (replaced by the Free Play wedge). It doesn't help that the Prize Puzzle is ''never'' affected by budget cuts whenever the show makes them.

to:

* CreatorsPet: The Prize Puzzle. The show has warmed up to it but fans certainly haven't (mentioned in TheScrappy below). Introduced in Season 21, they Prize Puzzles originally occurred weekly. Two seasons later, they started occurring daily. Since its introduction, many popular elements have been retired ostensibly to make room for it, such as the Jackpot Round, the bonus categories and the Free Spin (replaced by the Free Play wedge). It doesn't help that the Prize Puzzle is ''never'' affected by budget cuts whenever the show makes them.
17th May '16 5:37:42 PM KoopaKid17
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Added DiffLines:

*** Then there's the awkward shoehorning of puzzles in order to meet a certain category's criteria. Rhyme Time has devolved into "two random words that rhyme" such as RIGATONI & MACARONI while What Are You Doing? especially in the Bonus Round is essentially "random -ing word".
6th Apr '16 10:18:39 AM KoopaKid17
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** ''Wheel 2000'' has this egregious example. On the October 4, 1997 episode, the blue player calls the last consonant in the Speed-Up puzzle GOOSE BUMPS. At this point, a signal should play to tell the contestants that only vowels remain. However, no such notification is given until ''after'' the red player picks a (nonexistent) consonant, at which point Lucy says "There's only vowels left, I believe." before the yellow contestant's turn. That player picks the O's and solves for 550 points, making the final scores 1,550, 550, and 1,900. What makes it worse is that the error ended up '''''affecting the outcome of the game.''''' On a successful solve worth 750 points, the red contestant would've had enough to go to the Bonus Round.

to:

** ''Wheel 2000'' has this egregious example. On the October 4, 1997 episode, the blue player calls the last consonant in the Speed-Up puzzle GOOSE BUMPS. At this point, a signal should play to tell the contestants that only vowels remain. However, no such notification is given until ''after'' the red player picks a (nonexistent) consonant, at which point Lucy says "There's only vowels left, I believe." before the yellow contestant's turn. That player picks the O's and solves for 550 points, making the final scores 1,550, 550, and 1,900. What makes it worse is that Unlike the error ended above example, this ''did'' end up '''''affecting affecting the outcome of the game.''''' game. On a successful solve worth 750 points, the red contestant would've had enough to go to the Bonus Round.
11th Mar '16 4:38:06 PM KoopaKid17
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** On modern-day episodes, the $1,000 Toss-Up (and often other puzzles throughout the game) has something to do with the week's theme 99% of the time. This makes it much easier to figure them out to point of some GenreSavvy fans being able to figure out the puzzle with no letters, or even ''before the blanks come up.'' Some themes have more themed puzzles than others; some weeks have only the $1,000 Toss-Up and sometimes one "regular" puzzle themed (often part of a Before & After or Same Name), while others have nearly ''every'' puzzle themed, such as Teacher's Week.

to:

** On modern-day episodes, the $1,000 Toss-Up (and often other puzzles throughout the game) has something to do with the week's theme 99% of the time. This makes it much easier to figure them out to point of some GenreSavvy fans being able to figure out the puzzle with no letters, or even ''before the blanks come up.'' Some themes have more themed puzzles than others; some weeks have only the $1,000 Toss-Up and sometimes one "regular" puzzle themed (often part of a Before & After or Same Name), while others have nearly ''every'' puzzle themed, such as the Disney Weeks and Teacher's Week.
4th Mar '16 10:43:59 PM RAS310
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** On modern-day episodes, the $1,000 Toss-Up (and often other puzzles throughout the game) has something to do with the week's theme 99% of the time. This makes it much easier to figure them out to point of some GenreSavvy fans being able to figure out the puzzle with no letters, or even ''before the blanks come up.'' Some themes have more themed puzzles than others; some weeks have only the $1,000 Toss-Up and sometimes one "regular" puzzle themed (often part of a Before & After or Same Name), while others have nearly ''every'' puzzle themed, such as the recent Disney weeks.

to:

** On modern-day episodes, the $1,000 Toss-Up (and often other puzzles throughout the game) has something to do with the week's theme 99% of the time. This makes it much easier to figure them out to point of some GenreSavvy fans being able to figure out the puzzle with no letters, or even ''before the blanks come up.'' Some themes have more themed puzzles than others; some weeks have only the $1,000 Toss-Up and sometimes one "regular" puzzle themed (often part of a Before & After or Same Name), while others have nearly ''every'' puzzle themed, such as the recent Disney weeks.Teacher's Week.



** As the 2010's progress, the week's theme affects the puzzles more and more each season, to the point where it is now rare that the $1,000 Toss-Up does ''not'' have anything to do with the theme (although the $2,000 one is almost always unrelated). This can often lead to outlandish puzzles such as a I'LL BE IN THE SAUNA during a spa-themed week. Some themes are heavily or exclusively reflected in the puzzles more than anything compared to the set and prizes, such as "Wheel Was Here", where the $1,000 Toss-Up is always a city that the show has taped in before, and Season 33's version of "Big Money Week" (see below).



*** To the show's credit, the frequency of the minimum value being hit in Season 33 is on track to be less than that of Season 32. However, the current season is set to finish with a worse win-loss record; while most modern seasons end with around 35-40% of Bonus Rounds being won, Season 33's win rate hovers around a mere '''27%'''.



*** Most notably, it was quietly revealed that there would absolutely ''no'' remote tapings for the entire season, the first nighttime season since Season 8 without such shows. It should be noted that the number of remotes per season gradually decreased in the seasons preceding this, though - from as high as four in Seasons 15-16, to three in Season 17-24, to two in Seasons 25-28, to just one in Seasons 29-32.
*** After the first 12 episodes of the season were taped (which did not air in order), the number of $900 wedges on the Wheel was reduced from three to just one (although one of the two casualties is retained for Round 3 only) and one of the two $800 wedges was reduced to $650. Overall, this leaves only three regular wedges valued above $700 (four in Round 3) counting the top dollar value.

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*** Most notably, it was quietly revealed that there would absolutely ''no'' remote tapings for the entire season, the first nighttime season since Season 8 without such shows. It should be noted that the number of remotes per season gradually decreased in the seasons preceding this, though - from as high as four in Seasons 15-16, to three in Season Seasons 17-24, to two in Seasons 25-28, to just one in Seasons 29-32.
29-32. The show did have plans to tape at Navy Pier in Chicago in October 2015, however.
*** After the first 12 episodes of the season were taped (which did not air in order), the number of $900 wedges on the Wheel was reduced from three to just one (although one of the two casualties is retained for Round 3 only) and one of the two $800 wedges was reduced to $650. Overall, this leaves only three regular wedges valued above $700 (four in Round 3) counting the top dollar value. It didn't help that one of the former $900s (now the yellow $600 two wedges clockwise of $5000) was and still is frequently landed on for the Final Spin.


Added DiffLines:

*** Season 33 also saw the first Big Money Week since Season 29, a theme which ''ThePriceIsRight'' now does each season with ''much'' higher stakes than normal episodes in just about every way possible. While ''Wheel's'' previous Big Money Week saw a set decorated with giant money bags and stacks of gold coins along with increased stakes in the Bonus Round, Season 33's Big Money Week has nothing more to offer than normal episodes except for a higher-than-usual car in the Bonus Round, plus only the show's generic set is used.
14th Feb '16 10:55:57 AM KoopaKid17
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Added DiffLines:

*** Fans were surprised at first to see $650 come back in Season 30 since it was retired four years before the syndicated version began. Its dominance on the wheel a few seasons afterward have not pleased fans, especially those who have been waiting since 1996 for $750 to return.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=YMMV.WheelOfFortune