History YMMV / ToKillAMockingbird

3rd Apr '16 4:29:01 PM MobRules
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* JerkassWoobie: Mayella. While she's a very unpleasant young woman who has falsely accused an innocent man of assault, it's difficult not to pity her. She lost her mother at a young age, lives in poverty and squalor, struggles to raise her siblings with no help, has no friends, endures physical abuse from her father, and it's strongly implied that she endures sexual abuse from her father as well. She came on to Tom because she was lonely and he was the only person who had shown her kindness, and then was forced to falsely accuse Tom out of fear of her father.

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* JerkassWoobie: Mayella. While she's a very unpleasant young woman who has falsely accused an innocent man of assault, it's difficult not to pity her. She lost her mother at a young age, lives in poverty and squalor, struggles to raise her siblings with no help, has no friends, endures physical abuse from her father, and it's strongly implied that she endures sexual abuse from her father as well. She came on to Tom because she was lonely and he was the only person who had shown her kindness, and then was forced to falsely accuse Tom out of fear of her father. Also, being treated with respect was so alien to her that she was convinced that Atticus was mocking her when he spoke courteously to her in court.
19th Feb '16 7:33:43 PM vifetoile
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* CompleteMonster: [[spoiler:Robert E. Lee "Bob" Ewell]] personifies all that was wrong with the 1930s. [[spoiler:For starters, he's a terrible, neglectful father, to the point where the sheriff actually turns a blind eye to him hunting out of season out of pity for the little Ewells. He gets Tom Robinson, a disabled black man, arrested for supposedly raping and beating his daughter Mayella. Atticus, the defense lawyer, shows that Tom was physically incapable of committing the crime and that Bob caught Mayella making advances on an unwilling Tom and [[AbusiveParents beat her himself]]. Since the book takes place in the DeepSouth several decades before the Civil Rights movement, the all-white jury sentences Tom to death anyway. Bob Ewell still also tries to take revenge on those that ridiculed him during the trial, including Tom Robinson's widow, a poor woman with many children to feed and a job that doesn't pay well. He yells obscenities at her as she walks past his house on her way to work. When her boss finds out and threatens to have him arrested for it, Ewell then begins to ''stalk her as she goes to work''. When her boss again confronts him, Ewell claims that he couldn't be arrested because he never actually touched her. It's also implied at one point that [[ParentalIncest Bob himself has been sexually abusing Mayella]]. Even though Tom Robinson is dead, Bob stays angry with Atticus for digging up the truth. As revenge, he [[WouldHurtAChild tries to kill Atticus's children on their way home from a school play]].]]

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* CompleteMonster: [[spoiler:Robert Robert E. Lee "Bob" Ewell]] Ewell personifies all that was wrong with the 1930s. [[spoiler:For For starters, he's a terrible, neglectful father, to the point where the sheriff actually turns a blind eye to him hunting out of season out of pity for the little Ewells. He gets Tom Robinson, a disabled black man, arrested for supposedly raping and beating his daughter Mayella. Atticus, the defense lawyer, shows that Tom was physically incapable of committing the crime crime, and that it was Bob who caught Mayella making advances on an unwilling Tom and ,and [[AbusiveParents beat her himself]]. [[spoiler: Since the book takes place in the DeepSouth several decades before the Civil Rights movement, the all-white jury sentences Tom to death anyway. Bob Ewell still also tries to take revenge on those that ridiculed him during the trial, including Tom Robinson's widow, a poor woman with many children to feed and a job that doesn't pay well. He yells obscenities at her as she walks past his house on her way to work. When her boss finds out and threatens to have him arrested for it, Ewell then begins to ''stalk her as she goes to work''. When her boss again confronts him, Ewell claims that he couldn't be arrested because he never actually touched her. It's also implied at one point that [[ParentalIncest Bob himself has been sexually abusing Mayella]]. Even though Tom Robinson is dead, Bob stays angry with Atticus for digging up the truth. As revenge, he [[WouldHurtAChild tries to kill Atticus's children on their way home from a school play]].]]
19th Feb '16 7:29:05 PM vifetoile
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* CompleteMonster: [[spoiler:Robert E. Lee "Bob" Ewell]] personifies all that was wrong with the 1930s. [[spoiler:He gets Tom Robinson, a disabled black man, arrested for supposedly raping and beating his daughter Mayella. Atticus, the defense lawyer, shows that Tom was physically incapable of committing the crime and that Bob caught Mayella making advances on an unwilling Tom and [[AbusiveParents beat her himself]]. Since the book takes place in the DeepSouth several decades before the Civil Rights movement, the all-white jury sentences Tom to death anyway. Bob Ewell still also tries to take revenge on those that ridiculed him during the trial, including Tom Robinson's widow, a poor woman with many children to feed and a job that doesn't pay well. He yells obscenities at her as she walks past his house on her way to work. When her boss finds out and threatens to have him arrested for it, Ewell then begins to ''stalk her as she goes to work''. When her boss again confronts him, Ewell claims that he couldn't be arrested because he never actually touched her. It's also implied at one point that [[ParentalIncest Bob himself has been sexually abusing Mayella]]. Even though Tom Robinson is dead, Bob stays angry with Atticus for digging up the truth. As revenge, he [[WouldHurtAChild tries to kill Atticus's children on their way home from a school play]].]]

to:

* CompleteMonster: [[spoiler:Robert E. Lee "Bob" Ewell]] personifies all that was wrong with the 1930s. [[spoiler:He [[spoiler:For starters, he's a terrible, neglectful father, to the point where the sheriff actually turns a blind eye to him hunting out of season out of pity for the little Ewells. He gets Tom Robinson, a disabled black man, arrested for supposedly raping and beating his daughter Mayella. Atticus, the defense lawyer, shows that Tom was physically incapable of committing the crime and that Bob caught Mayella making advances on an unwilling Tom and [[AbusiveParents beat her himself]]. Since the book takes place in the DeepSouth several decades before the Civil Rights movement, the all-white jury sentences Tom to death anyway. Bob Ewell still also tries to take revenge on those that ridiculed him during the trial, including Tom Robinson's widow, a poor woman with many children to feed and a job that doesn't pay well. He yells obscenities at her as she walks past his house on her way to work. When her boss finds out and threatens to have him arrested for it, Ewell then begins to ''stalk her as she goes to work''. When her boss again confronts him, Ewell claims that he couldn't be arrested because he never actually touched her. It's also implied at one point that [[ParentalIncest Bob himself has been sexually abusing Mayella]]. Even though Tom Robinson is dead, Bob stays angry with Atticus for digging up the truth. As revenge, he [[WouldHurtAChild tries to kill Atticus's children on their way home from a school play]].]]
5th Feb '16 9:42:04 PM fionaj249
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** This book shed light on the true evil of false rape accusations, an issue not given enough light, even in today's age where they're terrifyingly common
9th Jan '16 4:51:49 PM TotalDramaRox97
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Added DiffLines:

** This book shed light on the true evil of false rape accusations, an issue not given enough light, even in today's age where they're terrifyingly common
21st Aug '15 3:13:43 PM Luigifan
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* CompleteMonster: [[spoiler:Robert E. Lee "Bob" Ewell]] personifies all that was wrong with the 1930s. [[spoiler:He gets Tom Robinson, a disabled black man, arrested for supposedly raping and beating his daughter Mayella. Atticus, the defense lawyer, shows that Tom was physically incapable of committing the crime and that Bob caught Mayella making advances on an unwilling Tom and [[AbusiveParents beat her himself]]. Since the book takes place in the DeepSouth several decades before the Civil Rights movement, the all-white jury sentences Tom to death anyway. Bob Ewell still also tries to take revenge on those that ridiculed him during the trial, including Tom Robinson's widow, a poor woman with many children to feed and a job that doesn't pay well. He yells obscenities at her as she walks past his house on the way to work. When her boss finds out and threatens to have him arrested for it, Ewell then begins to ''stalk her as she goes to work''. When her boss again confronts him, Ewell claims that he couldn't be arrested because he never actually touched her. It's also implied at one point that [[ParentalIncest Bob himself has been sexually abusing Mayella]]. Even though Tom Robinson is dead, Bob stays angry with Atticus for digging up the truth. As revenge, he [[WouldHurtAChild tries to kill Atticus's children on their way home from a school play]].]]
* EveryoneIsJesusInPurgatory: According to an apocryphal tale, Harper Lee was once giving a speech on the book at a high school where the students asked a lot of questions about its symbolism. Lee replied that there was none, and that she was merely [[MoneyDearBoy a starving writer trying to make a buck]]. Nevertheless the questions continued and she got more and more irritated until finally, someone asked why so many characters were named after Confederate generals. She responded, "[[WriteWhoYouKnow they were white trash. At the time, all white trash who lived in the South were named after Confederate generals.]]" No more questions were asked; the audience was too busy thinking about whether their classmates were named after Confederate generals.

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* CompleteMonster: [[spoiler:Robert E. Lee "Bob" Ewell]] personifies all that was wrong with the 1930s. [[spoiler:He gets Tom Robinson, a disabled black man, arrested for supposedly raping and beating his daughter Mayella. Atticus, the defense lawyer, shows that Tom was physically incapable of committing the crime and that Bob caught Mayella making advances on an unwilling Tom and [[AbusiveParents beat her himself]]. Since the book takes place in the DeepSouth several decades before the Civil Rights movement, the all-white jury sentences Tom to death anyway. Bob Ewell still also tries to take revenge on those that ridiculed him during the trial, including Tom Robinson's widow, a poor woman with many children to feed and a job that doesn't pay well. He yells obscenities at her as she walks past his house on the her way to work. When her boss finds out and threatens to have him arrested for it, Ewell then begins to ''stalk her as she goes to work''. When her boss again confronts him, Ewell claims that he couldn't be arrested because he never actually touched her. It's also implied at one point that [[ParentalIncest Bob himself has been sexually abusing Mayella]]. Even though Tom Robinson is dead, Bob stays angry with Atticus for digging up the truth. As revenge, he [[WouldHurtAChild tries to kill Atticus's children on their way home from a school play]].]]
* EveryoneIsJesusInPurgatory: According to an apocryphal tale, Harper Lee was once giving a speech on the book at a high school where the students asked a lot of questions about its symbolism. Lee replied that there was none, and that she was merely [[MoneyDearBoy a starving writer trying to make a buck]]. Nevertheless Nevertheless, the questions continued continued, and she got more and more irritated until finally, someone asked why so many characters were named after Confederate generals. She responded, "[[WriteWhoYouKnow they were white trash. At the time, all white trash who lived in the South were named after Confederate generals.]]" No more questions were asked; the audience was too busy thinking about whether their classmates were named after Confederate generals.



* MoralEventHorizon: It's hard to tell when Bob crossed this, from beating and raping his own daughter and falsely accusing an innocent man of it, to [[spoiler: trying to kill two kids]]. Bottom line, he crossed it at some point.
** The men [[spoiler:on the jury who condemn Tom to death]] also crossed it with that action, all of them except [[spoiler:Mr Cunningham, the only dissenting voice who was eventually pressured into line with the rest. None of them could have ''really'' believed Tom was guilty, no matter what they told themselves, yet they condemned a man who they ''knew'' was innocent to die ''just because he was black and because they refused to endorse the idea that a black man's word could ever be worth as much as a white man's.'']] It was nothing less than [[spoiler:state-sponsored, judicial murder,]] and [[KarmaHoudini they all get away with it too.]]

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* MoralEventHorizon: It's hard to tell when Bob crossed this, from beating and raping his own daughter and falsely accusing an innocent man of it, to [[spoiler: trying [[spoiler:trying to kill two kids]]. Bottom line, he crossed it at some point.
** The men [[spoiler:on the jury who condemn Tom to death]] also crossed it with that action, all of them except [[spoiler:Mr [[spoiler:Mr. Cunningham, the only dissenting voice who was eventually pressured into line with the rest. None of them could have ''really'' believed Tom was guilty, no matter what they told themselves, yet they condemned a man who they ''knew'' was innocent to die ''just because he was black and because they refused to endorse the idea that a black man's word could ever be worth as much as a white man's.'']] It was nothing less than [[spoiler:state-sponsored, judicial murder,]] and [[KarmaHoudini they all get away with it it, too.]]



* SomeAnvilsNeedToBeDropped: Treating people unfairly because they have a different skin color from you is wrong. A similar moral in empathy is dropped with Boo Radley, who is shunned for being different. Remember, the novel was published in 1960, five years before, three white men savagely killed Emmett Till, a 14-year-old black boy, for the "crime" of allegedly flirting at a white woman. The all-white jury acquitted the two killers despite being presented with irrefutable evidence of their guilt after only 30-minutes of deliberation (in fact, the accused then proceeded to boast of their crime in local newspapers, once safe in the protection of Double Jeopardy Laws).

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* SomeAnvilsNeedToBeDropped: Treating people unfairly because they have a different skin color from you is wrong. A similar moral in empathy is dropped with Boo Radley, who is shunned for being different. Remember, the novel was published in 1960, 1960; five years before, three white men savagely killed Emmett Till, a 14-year-old black boy, for the "crime" of allegedly flirting at a white woman. The all-white jury acquitted the two killers despite being presented with irrefutable evidence of their guilt after only 30-minutes of deliberation (in fact, the accused then proceeded to boast of their crime in local newspapers, once safe in the protection of Double Jeopardy Laws).



** Most {{Fanfic}} writers seem to have forgotten that Scout may be a tomboy but she is also a church-going small-towner from pre-1950s Alabama--many of the things that they have her do in fan fiction (especially HighSchoolAU) would give the real Scout a massive attack of the vapours.
** Tom Robinson implies that Mayella's father sexually abused her in less than a sentence--one left out of the film [[note]]"She says what her pa do to her don't count."[[/note]], and it is never brought up again, even though Lee wrote the book in the 1960s. This is because it was considered ''scientific fact'' that parental incest was imaginary on the part of the child, up until about the '70s. Modern readers, especially high schoolers, are often shocked that this aspect wasn't given greater weight.
* ValuesResonance: Many of the book's messages and morals are resonant even in today's world. Discrimination against minorities in the US is still widespread, with more attention given nowadays due to the rise of social media platform.

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** Most {{Fanfic}} writers seem to have forgotten that Scout may be a tomboy tomboy, but she is also a church-going small-towner from pre-1950s Alabama--many Alabama -- many of the things that they have her do in fan fiction (especially HighSchoolAU) would give the real Scout a massive attack of the vapours.
** Tom Robinson implies that Mayella's father sexually abused her in less than a sentence--one sentence -- one left out of the film [[note]]"She says what her pa do to her don't count."[[/note]], and it is never brought up again, even though Lee wrote the book in the 1960s. This is because it was considered ''scientific fact'' that parental incest was imaginary on the part of the child, up until about the '70s. Modern readers, especially high schoolers, are often shocked that this aspect wasn't given greater weight.
* ValuesResonance: Many of the book's messages and morals are resonant even in today's world. Discrimination against minorities in the US is still widespread, with more attention given nowadays due to the rise of social media platform.



** Jem qualifies as well. As a kid going through puberty he already has a lot of difficulties going on and throughout the book his struggles keep piling up with seeing the reality and how horrifying it truly is and having him and his sister slowly grow apart. May be a JerkassWoobie given how him growing apart from Scout is somewhat his own fault. He also had genetic heart conditions that gave him an early death.

to:

** Jem qualifies as well. As a kid going through puberty puberty, he already has a lot of difficulties going on on, and throughout the book his struggles keep piling up with seeing the reality and how horrifying it truly is and having him and his sister slowly grow apart. May be a JerkassWoobie given how him growing apart from Scout is somewhat his own fault. He also had genetic heart conditions that gave him an early death.
8th Aug '15 8:36:06 PM KnightofNASA
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* ValuesResonance: Many of the book's messages and morals are resonant even in today's world, especially with the rise of Tumblr and its Social Justice Warriors, many of whom are not only childishly racist, refuse to think rationally, and are hypocritical, but relentlessly shun those who are different or don't share their views without consequence without considering other sides of the story. Clearly [=SJWs=] need to read this book.

to:

* ValuesResonance: Many of the book's messages and morals are resonant even in today's world, especially world. Discrimination against minorities in the US is still widespread, with more attention given nowadays due to the rise of Tumblr and its Social Justice Warriors, many of whom are not only childishly racist, refuse to think rationally, and are hypocritical, but relentlessly shun those who are different or don't share their views without consequence without considering other sides of the story. Clearly [=SJWs=] need to read this book.social media platform.



** Jem qualifies as well. As a kid going through puberty he already has a lot of difficulties going on and throughout the book his struggles keep piling up with seeing the reality and how horrifying it truly is and having him and his sister slowly grow apart. May be a JerkassWoobie given how him growing apart from Scout is somewhat his own fault.

to:

** Jem qualifies as well. As a kid going through puberty he already has a lot of difficulties going on and throughout the book his struggles keep piling up with seeing the reality and how horrifying it truly is and having him and his sister slowly grow apart. May be a JerkassWoobie given how him growing apart from Scout is somewhat his own fault. He also had genetic heart conditions that gave him an early death.
3rd Aug '15 2:54:48 PM MechWarrior
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* ValuesResonance: Many of the book's messages and morals are resonant even in today's world, especially with the rise of Tumblr and its Social Justice Warriors, many of whom are not only childishly racist, refuse to think rationally, and are hypocritical, but relentlessly shun those who are different or don't share their views without consequence without considering other sides of the story. Clearly SJWs need to read this book.

to:

* ValuesResonance: Many of the book's messages and morals are resonant even in today's world, especially with the rise of Tumblr and its Social Justice Warriors, many of whom are not only childishly racist, refuse to think rationally, and are hypocritical, but relentlessly shun those who are different or don't share their views without consequence without considering other sides of the story. Clearly SJWs [=SJWs=] need to read this book.
29th Jul '15 6:15:03 AM Firechick12012
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Added DiffLines:

* ValuesResonance: Many of the book's messages and morals are resonant even in today's world, especially with the rise of Tumblr and its Social Justice Warriors, many of whom are not only childishly racist, refuse to think rationally, and are hypocritical, but relentlessly shun those who are different or don't share their views without consequence without considering other sides of the story. Clearly SJWs need to read this book.
17th Jul '15 7:45:41 AM Anddrix
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* ContestedSequel: ''Go Set a Watchman''. Not only is it a classic case of ToughActToFollow but also [[spoiler: Atticus gets transformed from beloved father and CrusadingLawyer ito a bitter bigot railing against the desegregation of the South. It also Retcons an important plotpoint: instead of the jury finding Tom guilty on the trumped up rape charge, Atticus gets him off not by proving that Tom didn't rape her, but that it was ''consensual'' instead. Yes really.]]
** Technically, Go Set a Watchman isn't a sequel. It is the original draft that Harper Lee wrote, but on editor advice she revised and rewrote it into what became To Kill a Mockingbird. The original draft was published unedited, which is why there are continuity errors between the two books and passages in Watchman that were reused nearly word-for-word in Mockingbird.
* DroppedABridgeOnHim: In ''Go Set a Watchman'' [[spoiler:Jem has died of a heart attack during the 20 year TimeSkip. More understandable than most since the book was Lee's original idea for the story, and Jem only became a major character when she was convinced to examine their childhoods instead.]]



* FanonDiscontinuity: The unusual circumstances of the publication of ''Go Set a Watchman'', with many accusations that the now elderly and almost blind and deaf Harper Lee had been taken advantage of by her publisher, makes it quite easy to disregard its rather controversial aspects.
* InternetBackdraft: [[spoiler: Atticus Finch has a place in American pop culture as moral crusader who inspired countless young people to become lawyers, so his jarring transformation into an Pro-Segregation bigot in ''Go Set a Watchman'' literally set the Internet on fire, with many claiming that the book was published without Harper Lee's consent or that the publisher took advantage of her since she's in her old age.]]



** Jem qualifies as well. As a kid going through puberty he already has a lot of difficulties going on and throughout the book his struggles keep piling up with seeing the reality and how horrifying it truly is and having him and his sister slowly grow apart. May be a JerkassWoobie given how him growing apart from Scout is somewhat his own fault

to:

** Jem qualifies as well. As a kid going through puberty he already has a lot of difficulties going on and throughout the book his struggles keep piling up with seeing the reality and how horrifying it truly is and having him and his sister slowly grow apart. May be a JerkassWoobie given how him growing apart from Scout is somewhat his own faultfault.
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