History YMMV / TheThornBirds

7th Feb '16 7:18:14 PM DrOO7
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* {{Sequelitis}}: ''The Missing Years'' suffers from this, thanks to the myriad of inconsistencies in storyline and characterization.
15th Oct '15 11:32:00 PM DrOO7
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** Also when Meggie does [[CallingTheOldManOut call the old WOMAN out]]. After she gives birth to Dane, her mother Fee instantly knows that the boy is Ralph's and starts lecturing her. Meggie shuts her up by informing her, "If you tell Ralph, I'll be as miserable to you as you've always been to me!", finally blasting Fee for what a negligent mother she was.
2nd Oct '15 10:24:57 AM DrOO7
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* {{Tearjerker}}: Meggie and Fee finally ending years of estrangement and embracing.

* {{Tearjerker}}: Meggie and Fee finally ending years of estrangement and embracing.
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* {{Tearjerker}}: Meggie WhatDoYouMeanItsNotSymbolic: Meggie's pregnancy with Justine (the child of a husband she doesn't love) is difficult from beginning to end--frequent morning sickness, a delivery in which they both almost perish. Then, she produces no breast-milk and Fee finally ending years suffers from post-partum depression severe enough to keep her from bonding with her daughter. Her pregnancy with Dane (the son of estrangement the man she's loved most of her life) is ridiculously easy to the point where labor and embracing.delivery is virtually painless and takes no time at all and she's able to nurse with no trouble.
28th Oct '13 4:24:46 AM Ciara13
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** Apparently - and ironically, considering the scandal surrounding the Catholic Church now - some merely shrugged and said "At least it was with a woman."
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** *** Apparently - and ironically, considering the scandal surrounding the Catholic Church now - some merely shrugged and said "At least it was with a woman."
14th Aug '13 12:09:54 AM BondGirl
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** Here's a good one--Meggie is aghast at the notion of officially divorcing Luke even though she left him years ago because she's a good Catholic. A good Catholic who wanted a priest to abandon his vows to be with her and ultimately committed adultery with said priest, had his child, and has passed the child off as her husband's. Once again, it's Fee to call her out on her hypocrisy.
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** Here's a good one--Meggie is aghast at the notion of officially divorcing Luke even though she left him years ago because she's a good Catholic. A good Catholic who wanted a priest to abandon his vows to be with her and ultimately committed adultery with said priest, had his child, and has passed the child off as her husband's.husband's and has repeatedly denounced the church and God, blaming them for the reason she can't be with the man she loves. Once again, it's Fee to call her out on her hypocrisy.
17th Apr '13 1:18:06 PM mlsmithca
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YMMV is an index, not a trope. It should not be linked from any trope or work page for any reason. (This is a YMMV page anyway, so it's redundant.) Also, tropes should be alphabetised by name (leading articles excluded).
* AlternateCharacterInterpretation: Because of the juicy, scandalous premise of the book (priest and beautiful woman have an affair), a lot of people think it's a discussion about chastity, or God, or the nature of priestly vows. The driving arc for Ralph, however, is his letting go of the prideful idea of being the "perfect priest" (which really only strokes his own ego) and through making mistakes and self-awareness, eventually becomes a good priest.

* AlternateCharacterInterpretation: Because of the juicy, scandalous premise of the book (priest and beautiful woman have an affair), a lot of people think it's a discussion about chastity, or God, or the nature of priestly vows. The driving arc for Ralph, however, is his letting go of the prideful idea of being the "perfect priest" (which really only strokes his own ego) and through making mistakes and self-awareness, eventually becomes a good priest. Of course, as always, {{YMMV}}.
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* AlternateCharacterInterpretation: Because of the juicy, scandalous premise of the book (priest and beautiful woman have an affair), a lot of people think it's a discussion about chastity, or God, or the nature of priestly vows. The driving arc for Ralph, however, is his letting go of the prideful idea of being the "perfect priest" (which really only strokes his own ego) and through making mistakes and self-awareness, eventually becomes a good priest. Of course, as always, {{YMMV}}.----
17th Apr '13 11:59:19 AM Joyce
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fixed previous example—new trope name
* {{Tearjerker}}: Meggie and Fee finally ending years of estrangement and embracing.
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* {{Tearjerker}}: Meggie and Fee finally ending years of estrangement and embracing.embracing. * AlternateCharacterInterpretation: Because of the juicy, scandalous premise of the book (priest and beautiful woman have an affair), a lot of people think it's a discussion about chastity, or God, or the nature of priestly vows. The driving arc for Ralph, however, is his letting go of the prideful idea of being the "perfect priest" (which really only strokes his own ego) and through making mistakes and self-awareness, eventually becomes a good priest. Of course, as always, {{YMMV}}.
16th Apr '13 9:54:33 AM mlsmithca
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* {{Tearjerker}}: Meggie and Fee finally ending years of estrangement and embracing. * {{CompletelyMissingThePoint}}: Because of the juicy, scandalous premise of the book (priest and beautiful woman have an affair), a lot of people think it's a discussion about chastity, or God, or the nature of priestly vows. The driving arc for Ralph, however, is his letting go of the prideful idea of being the "perfect priest" (which really only strokes his own ego) and through making mistakes and self-awareness, eventually becomes a good priest. Of course, as always, {{YMMV}}.
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* {{Tearjerker}}: Meggie and Fee finally ending years of estrangement and embracing. * {{CompletelyMissingThePoint}}: Because of the juicy, scandalous premise of the book (priest and beautiful woman have an affair), a lot of people think it's a discussion about chastity, or God, or the nature of priestly vows. The driving arc for Ralph, however, is his letting go of the prideful idea of being the "perfect priest" (which really only strokes his own ego) and through making mistakes and self-awareness, eventually becomes a good priest. Of course, as always, {{YMMV}}.embracing.
16th Apr '13 6:43:02 AM Joyce
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added an opinion
* {{Tearjerker}}: Meggie and Fee finally ending years of estrangement and embracing.
to:
* {{Tearjerker}}: Meggie and Fee finally ending years of estrangement and embracing.embracing. * {{CompletelyMissingThePoint}}: Because of the juicy, scandalous premise of the book (priest and beautiful woman have an affair), a lot of people think it's a discussion about chastity, or God, or the nature of priestly vows. The driving arc for Ralph, however, is his letting go of the prideful idea of being the "perfect priest" (which really only strokes his own ego) and through making mistakes and self-awareness, eventually becomes a good priest. Of course, as always, {{YMMV}}.
16th Apr '13 6:35:29 AM Joyce
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** This one's a little tricky. The miniseries plays up a quasi-romantic vibe between young Meggie and Ralph. But the book is a lot more clear: Ralph's besetting sin was pride, particularly, that he imagined himself as being above all sexual need and feeling. On the night Mary Carson dies, and she tries to get him to kiss her and he refuses, she taunts him that he's probably impotent. In his later reflection about that conversation, it's implied that he hasn't felt sexual in years, if ever. In a conversation with Meggie a short time later, he explains that he can't spend so much time with her anymore because people will talk, she replies that if they knew him better, they would never consider it a possibility. When they finally do have sex (10 years later), he finally comes to the realization that that he's not so above it all, he becomes more humble, and a more compassionate priest.
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