History YMMV / TheTamingOfTheShrew

15th Apr '16 2:40:01 PM Sisi
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** That brutality wasn't spared on Petruchio either. There was some pretty physical wrestling going on between the two during the meeting scene. We're talking full-on headlocks and leg holds, like she was trying to crush his head between her thighs while hanging sideways off his neck.

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** *** That brutality wasn't spared on Petruchio either. There was some pretty physical wrestling going on between the two during the meeting scene. We're talking full-on headlocks and leg holds, like she was trying to crush his head between her thighs while hanging sideways off his neck.
15th Apr '16 2:38:49 PM Sisi
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Added DiffLines:

** That brutality wasn't spared on Petruchio either. There was some pretty physical wrestling going on between the two during the meeting scene. We're talking full-on headlocks and leg holds, like she was trying to crush his head between her thighs while hanging sideways off his neck.
22nd Jan '16 2:20:14 AM SeptimusHeap
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* AlternativeCharacterInterpretation: There is a theory that Kate doesn't genuinely submit to Petruchio but is putting on an act and merely becomes shrewd to get her way with her husband. Supporting this is how Kate doesn't gradually become submissive but, almost in exasperation, just starts agreeing with him in a completely unrealistic way, and [[SilkHidingSteel this behavior gets Petruchio to do what]] ''she'' wants. (Thus learning the very lesson he's trying to teach: one catches more flies with honey than with vinegar.)
** Another one: Petruchio is lampooning society (specifically gender roles) throughout the play; the "taming" is really him trying to get Kate to play along with him without having to drop the joke by telling her in front of other people. (Crucial bit to reading this: in that scene where Kate starts to go along with him, "moon" and "sun" are metaphors for Petruchio).
*** Actually "moon" and "sun" are a MetaJoke, based on the fact that all plays were performed under the open sky at mid afternoon and there were no or very few props and as such any of the things lighting and props do today were done by "word scenery", i.e. the characters setting the setting. This leads to people saying "AsYouKnow it is quite dark". Shakespeare toying with this here shows that indeed, his work makes it so. LeaningOnTheFourthWall, indeed.

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* AlternativeCharacterInterpretation: AlternativeCharacterInterpretation:
**
There is a theory that Kate doesn't genuinely submit to Petruchio but is putting on an act and merely becomes shrewd to get her way with her husband. Supporting this is how Kate doesn't gradually become submissive but, almost in exasperation, just starts agreeing with him in a completely unrealistic way, and [[SilkHidingSteel this behavior gets Petruchio to do what]] ''she'' wants. (Thus learning the very lesson he's trying to teach: one catches more flies with honey than with vinegar.)
** Another one: Petruchio is lampooning society (specifically gender roles) throughout the play; the "taming" is really him trying to get Kate to play along with him without having to drop the joke by telling her in front of other people. (Crucial bit to reading this: in that scene where Kate starts to go along with him, "moon" and "sun" are metaphors for Petruchio).\n*** Actually "moon" and "sun" are a MetaJoke, based on the fact that all plays were performed under the open sky at mid afternoon and there were no or very few props and as such any of the things lighting and props do today were done by "word scenery", i.e. the characters setting the setting. This leads to people saying "AsYouKnow it is quite dark". Shakespeare toying with this here shows that indeed, his work makes it so. LeaningOnTheFourthWall, indeed.
21st Jan '16 9:33:55 AM Jhonny
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Added DiffLines:

***Actually "moon" and "sun" are a MetaJoke, based on the fact that all plays were performed under the open sky at mid afternoon and there were no or very few props and as such any of the things lighting and props do today were done by "word scenery", i.e. the characters setting the setting. This leads to people saying "AsYouKnow it is quite dark". Shakespeare toying with this here shows that indeed, his work makes it so. LeaningOnTheFourthWall, indeed.
20th Jan '16 12:47:55 PM roxana
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Added DiffLines:

** It is also possible to read Kate's final speech as (a) a TakeThat to women who have been making her life miserable for years by vaunting her superior wifely virtue. And (b) really intended for Petruchio. The burden of her speech is that men love their wives and work for their benefit, she is telling her new husband that she understands why he's behaved the way he has to her and accepts, even welcomes, the lesson and his affection. The message is received: "Kiss me, Kate!"
8th Nov '15 7:13:32 AM TheLyniezian
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* ValuesDissonance: Even the most subversive and proto-feminist interpretations can't make all of the sexism palatable to modern audiences. And if you don't read it as subversive--if you take the text at face value, as a story of a domineering man breaking a woman to his will and turning her into a submissive -- the Values Dissonance is cranked UpToEleven.

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* ValuesDissonance: Even the most subversive and proto-feminist interpretations can't make all of the sexism palatable to modern audiences. And if you don't read it as subversive--if you take the text at face value, as a story of a domineering man breaking a woman to his will and turning her into a submissive -- the Values Dissonance is cranked UpToEleven. (As noted above, many of the "taming" methods look a lot like what we'd now call psychological torture to some interpreters.)
8th Nov '15 7:11:41 AM TheLyniezian
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Added DiffLines:

** Another rather more sinister possibility is that Kate actually believes what she's saying becase she's suffering from some sort of StockholmSyndrome and that Petruchio's "taming" methods look very much like now-recognized forms of psychological torture.
6th Sep '15 10:36:23 AM Thorion
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** The 2015 Stratford Shakespeare Festival's performance featured a rather... brutal Kate. From chasing a Bianca with bound hands with a sword to bashing Bianca's face into a pillar, she really does deserve what she got.
12th Aug '15 10:14:02 AM LaStella
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* ValuesResonance: Modern series such as the ''Fifty Shades'' and ''Submissive'' trilogies (written in the 21st century) also tell the story of a domineering man turning a woman into his submissive, and modern female readers apparently love them.

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* ValuesResonance: Modern series such as the ''Fifty Shades'' and ''Submissive'' trilogies (written in the 21st century) also tell the story of a domineering man turning a woman into his submissive, and ''[[FemaleMisogynist some]]'' modern female readers apparently love them.
19th Jun '15 8:50:03 PM jet556
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* Kate sometimes comes across as a bully to her younger sister. This results, in what appears to be, Petruchio giving her a taste of her own medicine.

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* ** Kate sometimes comes across as a bully to her younger sister. This results, in what appears to be, Petruchio giving her a taste of her own medicine.
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