History YMMV / TheTamingOfTheShrew

14th Nov '17 3:25:45 PM Ciara25
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** Surprisingly, both male and female readers, viewers and audience members have viewed Kate as a woman who needs to learn humility. To be fair, they have a point; at one stage Kate hits a music teacher over the head with a lute simply because he told her she played some notes wrong, and at another stage she strikes Petruchio just for making a crude - but fairly benign - joke about her

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** Surprisingly, both male and female readers, viewers and audience members have viewed Kate as a woman who needs to learn humility. To be fair, they have a point; at one stage Kate hits a music teacher over the head with a lute simply because he told her she played some notes wrong, wrong and tried to show her how to do them properly, and at another stage she strikes Petruchio just for making a crude - but fairly benign - joke about her
10th Oct '17 5:23:15 PM Clanger00
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** It is also possible to read Kate's final speech as (a) a TakeThat to women who have been making her life miserable for years by vaunting her superior wifely virtue. And (b) really intended for Petruchio. The burden of her speech is that men love their wives and work for their benefit, she is telling her new husband that she understands why he's behaved the way he has to her and accepts, even welcomes, the lesson and his affection. The message is received: "Kiss me, Kate!"
29th Sep '17 6:56:21 AM Julia1984
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* ValuesResonance: Modern series such as the ''Fifty Shades'' and ''Submissive'' trilogies (written in the 21st century) also tell the story of a domineering man turning a woman into his submissive, and ''[[FemaleMisogynist some]]'' modern female readers apparently love them.
%%* WhyWouldAnyoneTakeThemBack

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* ValuesResonance: Modern series such as the ''Fifty Shades'' ''[[Literature/FiftyShadesOfGray Fifty Shades]]'' and ''Submissive'' trilogies (written in the 21st century) century by women) also tell the story of a domineering man turning a woman into his submissive, and ''[[FemaleMisogynist some]]'' [[AllGirlsWantBadBoys some]] modern female readers apparently love them.
%%* WhyWouldAnyoneTakeThemBack
them. The play also pre-dates the S&M fantasy (or at least the recognition thereof) with its dominant vs. submissive roles by several centuries.
30th Aug '16 3:06:12 PM corruptmalemenace
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Added DiffLines:

** There is also an interpretation which plays up the FramingDevice where the story is actually a play ''[[PlayWithinAPlay in-universe]]'', and one presumably being performed by male actors for a male audience. In this interpretation, the fact that no real woman has ever responded to things in the way that Kate does is the ''point'', and the joke is that the play is absurd but the guy it's being put on for is too dumb to notice.
26th Jun '16 3:40:22 AM highwaystonowhere
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Added DiffLines:

* UnintentionallySympathetic: even some of Shakespeare's contemporaries felt the treatment of Katharina was a bit harsh. This is even more prominent among modern readings, with Kate being popularly interpreted as an abuse victim.
15th Apr '16 2:40:01 PM Sisi
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** That brutality wasn't spared on Petruchio either. There was some pretty physical wrestling going on between the two during the meeting scene. We're talking full-on headlocks and leg holds, like she was trying to crush his head between her thighs while hanging sideways off his neck.

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** *** That brutality wasn't spared on Petruchio either. There was some pretty physical wrestling going on between the two during the meeting scene. We're talking full-on headlocks and leg holds, like she was trying to crush his head between her thighs while hanging sideways off his neck.
15th Apr '16 2:38:49 PM Sisi
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Added DiffLines:

** That brutality wasn't spared on Petruchio either. There was some pretty physical wrestling going on between the two during the meeting scene. We're talking full-on headlocks and leg holds, like she was trying to crush his head between her thighs while hanging sideways off his neck.
22nd Jan '16 2:20:14 AM SeptimusHeap
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* AlternativeCharacterInterpretation: There is a theory that Kate doesn't genuinely submit to Petruchio but is putting on an act and merely becomes shrewd to get her way with her husband. Supporting this is how Kate doesn't gradually become submissive but, almost in exasperation, just starts agreeing with him in a completely unrealistic way, and [[SilkHidingSteel this behavior gets Petruchio to do what]] ''she'' wants. (Thus learning the very lesson he's trying to teach: one catches more flies with honey than with vinegar.)
** Another one: Petruchio is lampooning society (specifically gender roles) throughout the play; the "taming" is really him trying to get Kate to play along with him without having to drop the joke by telling her in front of other people. (Crucial bit to reading this: in that scene where Kate starts to go along with him, "moon" and "sun" are metaphors for Petruchio).
*** Actually "moon" and "sun" are a MetaJoke, based on the fact that all plays were performed under the open sky at mid afternoon and there were no or very few props and as such any of the things lighting and props do today were done by "word scenery", i.e. the characters setting the setting. This leads to people saying "AsYouKnow it is quite dark". Shakespeare toying with this here shows that indeed, his work makes it so. LeaningOnTheFourthWall, indeed.

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* AlternativeCharacterInterpretation: AlternativeCharacterInterpretation:
**
There is a theory that Kate doesn't genuinely submit to Petruchio but is putting on an act and merely becomes shrewd to get her way with her husband. Supporting this is how Kate doesn't gradually become submissive but, almost in exasperation, just starts agreeing with him in a completely unrealistic way, and [[SilkHidingSteel this behavior gets Petruchio to do what]] ''she'' wants. (Thus learning the very lesson he's trying to teach: one catches more flies with honey than with vinegar.)
** Another one: Petruchio is lampooning society (specifically gender roles) throughout the play; the "taming" is really him trying to get Kate to play along with him without having to drop the joke by telling her in front of other people. (Crucial bit to reading this: in that scene where Kate starts to go along with him, "moon" and "sun" are metaphors for Petruchio).\n*** Actually "moon" and "sun" are a MetaJoke, based on the fact that all plays were performed under the open sky at mid afternoon and there were no or very few props and as such any of the things lighting and props do today were done by "word scenery", i.e. the characters setting the setting. This leads to people saying "AsYouKnow it is quite dark". Shakespeare toying with this here shows that indeed, his work makes it so. LeaningOnTheFourthWall, indeed.
21st Jan '16 9:33:55 AM Jhonny
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Added DiffLines:

***Actually "moon" and "sun" are a MetaJoke, based on the fact that all plays were performed under the open sky at mid afternoon and there were no or very few props and as such any of the things lighting and props do today were done by "word scenery", i.e. the characters setting the setting. This leads to people saying "AsYouKnow it is quite dark". Shakespeare toying with this here shows that indeed, his work makes it so. LeaningOnTheFourthWall, indeed.
20th Jan '16 12:47:55 PM roxana
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Added DiffLines:

** It is also possible to read Kate's final speech as (a) a TakeThat to women who have been making her life miserable for years by vaunting her superior wifely virtue. And (b) really intended for Petruchio. The burden of her speech is that men love their wives and work for their benefit, she is telling her new husband that she understands why he's behaved the way he has to her and accepts, even welcomes, the lesson and his affection. The message is received: "Kiss me, Kate!"
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