History YMMV / ThePriceIsRight

15th Apr '17 11:58:25 AM Lirodon
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** As noted on-air by Bob Barker, a case of this had actually occurred during the 1994-95 season, with the syndicated ''The New Price Is Right'', hosted by Doug Davidson, confusing viewers into thinking the daytime version ("the '''old''' ''Price Is Right''") had been canceled or that something similar had happened, much to Barker's chagrin. [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=etJl_tMGCQU This promo]] mentions a "new host", apparently leading people to think the daytime show moved to syndication as a half-hour show with a new set and host.

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** [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QkLBxBw-9ec&feature=youtu.be As noted on-air by Bob Barker, Barker]], a case of this had actually occurred during the 1994-95 season, with the syndicated ''The New Price Is Right'', hosted by Doug Davidson, confusing viewers into thinking the daytime version ("the '''old''' ''Price Is Right''") had been canceled or that something similar had happened, much to Barker's chagrin. [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=etJl_tMGCQU This promo]] mentions a "new host", apparently leading people to think the daytime show moved to syndication as a half-hour show with a new set and host.
9th Mar '17 3:54:01 AM shayaweinberger
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** Bart Eskander, who replaced Paul Alter, is generally cited as the show's worst director due to his oversimplifying of camera angles (e.g. not showing Bonus Game as it spins on the Turntable). It didn't help when, in Season 37 (the first season in HD/widescreen), he managed to shoot the climactic reveal for Lucky $even with the last digit ''outside the standard-definition "safe zone"''.

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** Bart Eskander, who replaced Paul Alter, Creator/PaulAlter, is generally cited as the show's worst director due to his oversimplifying of camera angles (e.g. not showing Bonus Game as it spins on the Turntable). It didn't help when, in Season 37 (the first season in HD/widescreen), he managed to shoot the climactic reveal for Lucky $even with the last digit ''outside the standard-definition "safe zone"''.
27th Dec '16 6:43:19 PM loyalmoonie
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** The firing of longtime model Janice Pennington in 2000. Having been with the show since the series premiere in 1972, Pennington was fired without any kind of on-air sendoff usually reserved for departing models after she refused to testify against Holly Hallstrom, who had filed a wrongful termination lawsuit against Barker after being fired for equally trivial reasons in 1995. This caused a huge uproar among the show's fanbase and had tarnished Barker's public image. Despite this, Pennington later stated in a MySpace post that she was let go by CBS, not by Barker...although it's likely that CBS was JustFollowingOrders.

to:

** The firing of longtime model Janice Pennington in 2000. Having been with the show since the series premiere in 1972, Pennington was fired without any kind of on-air sendoff usually reserved for departing models after she refused to testify against Holly Hallstrom, who had filed a wrongful termination lawsuit against Barker after being fired for equally trivial reasons in 1995. This caused a huge uproar among the show's fanbase and had tarnished Barker's public image. Despite this, Pennington later stated in a MySpace post that she was let go by CBS, not by Barker...although it's likely that CBS was JustFollowingOrders.Barker.



** Likewise, some people blame Creator/FremantleMedia for announcers not appearing on-camera from 2002-08. That was actually Barker's doing, though Fremantle took the heat by claiming it was a new worldwide policy.
** Bob Barker has been largely blamed for the termination of longtime model Janice Pennington, who was supposedly let go in 2000 for not testifying against Holly Hallstrom in her lawsuit against Barker. Despite this, Pennington later opened up on a MySpace post, where she mentioned to her colleagues that she was let go by the network and not Barker himself (though it's possible CBS was JustFollowingOrders).

to:

** Likewise, some people blame Creator/FremantleMedia for announcers not appearing on-camera from 2002-08. That was actually Barker's doing, though Fremantle took the heat by claiming it was a new worldwide policy.
2002-08.
** Bob Barker has been largely blamed for the termination of longtime model Janice Pennington, who was supposedly let go in 2000 for not testifying against Holly Hallstrom in her lawsuit against Barker. Despite this, Pennington later opened up on a MySpace post, where she mentioned to her colleagues that she was let go by the network and not Barker himself (though it's possible CBS was JustFollowingOrders).himself.
21st Dec '16 12:39:43 PM WarioBarker
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** While the original ''Price'' lasted for nine seasons, an extremely long run for a game show, the current version has aired for over 40 years. There are at least two generations of viewers who might have never heard of the Cullen era.

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** While the original ''Price'' lasted for nine seasons, years, an extremely long run for a game show, the current version has aired for over 40 years. There are at least two generations of viewers who might have never heard of the Cullen era.



** The final years of the Barker era have been seen as such due to increasing senior moments from the host, the elimination of Rod Roddy (who died in 2003) appearing on camera and models being fired for no reason.
** Other longtime fans feel the show entered it in Season 37 when Roger Dobkowitz was ousted. The show then relied on a plethora of gimmicks (including a showcase with [[UndesirablePrize 365 pairs of shoes]]) and specials (such as a show to commemorate the 30th anniversary of Plinko with the game being played ''six times''). The difficulties of many pricing games [[NintendoHard skyrocketed]] while others vanished without a trace. Season 37 also brought in Drewcases, showcase sketches that were completely off the wall and had little or no relation to the prizes. This was also the time when Rich Fields was ousted and when Pay the Rent was introduced, a least favorite pricing game among many fans. Some fans argue that the show has started coming out of it in Season 43 which saw some specials and gimmicks (or at least the unnecessary ones) dying down with the show feeling a lot more professional.

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** The final years of the Barker era have been seen as such due to increasing senior moments from the host, the elimination of Rod Roddy (who died in 2003) appearing on camera on-camera, and models being fired for no reason.
** Other longtime fans feel the show entered it in Season 37 37, when Roger Dobkowitz was ousted. The show then relied on a plethora of gimmicks (including celebrity appearances that ground the show to a showcase with halt), inexplicable prizes in the Showcase (including a coffee kiosk, a walk-in wine vault, and [[UndesirablePrize 365 pairs of shoes]]) shoes]]), and specials (such as a show to commemorate the 30th anniversary Anniversary of Plinko with the game being played ''six times''). The difficulties of many pricing games [[NintendoHard skyrocketed]] skyrocketed]], while others vanished without a trace. Season 37 also brought in Drewcases, showcase "Drewcases", Showcase sketches that were [[MeaningfulName written by Drew]] which were completely off the wall and had little or no relation to the prizes. This was also the time when Rich Fields was ousted and when Pay the Rent was introduced, a least favorite pricing game among many fans. Some fans argue that the show has started coming out of it in Season 43 which saw some specials and gimmicks (or at least the unnecessary ones) dying down with the show feeling a lot more professional.



* FakeDifficulty: Pay the Rent is frequently accused of this, mainly because its challenge mostly comes from [[WrongGenreSavvy completely subverting]] typical ''Price is Right'' psychology. Whereas typical pricing games involving ordering items from least to most expensive are ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin, the strange way that Pay the Rent works means that the least expensive item should actually go somewhere in the middle of the order. Players who follow the traditional way of thinking and put the least expensive item on the bottom (which is to say, almost everyone) are almost always [[ForegoneConclusion doomed from the start]].

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* FakeDifficulty: Pay the Rent is frequently accused of this, mainly because its challenge mostly comes from [[WrongGenreSavvy completely subverting]] typical ''Price is Right'' ''Price'' psychology. Whereas typical pricing games involving ordering items from least to most expensive are ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin, the strange way that Pay the Rent works means that the least expensive item should actually go somewhere in the middle of the order. Players who follow the traditional way of thinking and put the least expensive item on the bottom (which is to say, almost everyone) are almost always [[ForegoneConclusion doomed from the start]].



** The firing of longtime model Janice Pennington in 2000. Having been with the show since the pilot episode in 1972, Pennington was fired without any kind of on-air send off usually reserved for departing models after she refused to testify against Holly Hallstrom, who had filed a wrongful termination lawsuit against Barker after being fired for equally trivial reasons in 1995. This caused a huge uproar among the show's fanbase and had tarnished Barker's public image. Despite this, Pennington later stated in a MySpace post that she was let go by CBS, not by Barker.

to:

** The firing of longtime model Janice Pennington in 2000. Having been with the show since the pilot episode series premiere in 1972, Pennington was fired without any kind of on-air send off sendoff usually reserved for departing models after she refused to testify against Holly Hallstrom, who had filed a wrongful termination lawsuit against Barker after being fired for equally trivial reasons in 1995. This caused a huge uproar among the show's fanbase and had tarnished Barker's public image. Despite this, Pennington later stated in a MySpace post that she was let go by CBS, not by Barker.Barker...although it's likely that CBS was JustFollowingOrders.



** If you get called down, ''don't'' make joke bids like $420 or anything ending in 69--fans will never forgive you for wasting a spot in Contestant's Row if you do (and neither will the producers, Fremantle or CBS; one contestant who kept making bids like these plus a $2,000,000 bid got the episode he appeared on banned from reairing; this guy is detailed on the [[WhatAnIdiot/ThePriceIsRight What An Idiot]] page).

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** If you get called down, ''don't'' make joke bids like $420 or anything ending in 69--fans will never forgive you for wasting a spot in Contestant's Row if you do (and neither will the producers, Fremantle Fremantle, or CBS; one contestant who kept making bids like these plus a $2,000,000 bid got the episode he appeared on banned from reairing; this guy is detailed on the [[WhatAnIdiot/ThePriceIsRight What An Idiot]] page).



* FunnyAneurysmMoment: Eagle-eyed fans have noticed that the card used for the Credit Card pricing game has an expiration date of 12/07. This became a lot less amusing ever since Credit Card went on hiatus on October 31, 2008, ten months afterward, and still has yet to return.
* GameBreaker: A number of the games had different quirks where strategy was a key part in winning a game, as opposed to mere guessing games or where pricing/consumer knowledge was required. [[note]]Except for Clock Game, where binary search was always the way to win, the unwritten rules for many of these games were not always in place, only going in somewhere in 1979 or 1980, when Roger Dobkowitz was in charge of setting up most of the games.[[/note]] Examples:

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* FunnyAneurysmMoment: Eagle-eyed fans have noticed that the card used for the Credit Card pricing game has an expiration date of 12/07.12/07 (December 2007). This became a lot less amusing ever since Credit Card went on hiatus on October 31, 2008, ten months afterward, and still has yet to return.
* GameBreaker: A number of the games had different quirks where strategy was a key part in winning a game, as opposed to mere guessing games or where pricing/consumer knowledge was required. [[note]]Except [[note]](Except for Clock Game, where binary search was always the way to win, the unwritten rules for many of these games were not always in place, only going in somewhere in 1979 or 1980, when Roger Dobkowitz was in charge of setting up most of the games.[[/note]] )[[/note]] Examples:



** Most (in)famously, Samoans would appear semi-frequently in Bob's early years.

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** Most (in)famously, Samoans would appear semi-frequently in Bob's the late 1970s and early years.1980s.



** The show became a much less staid affair around the time that it expanded to an hour. Not only were there twice as many games, but the Showcases began using many more skits with then-announcer Johnny Olson (quite bizarre skits, too, coming from the quirky mind of then-producer Creator/JayWolpert), and new gameplay elements such as the Big Wheel were added as well.

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** The show became a much less staid affair around the time that it expanded to an hour. Not only were there twice as many games, but the Showcases began using many more skits with the models and then-announcer Johnny Olson (quite bizarre skits, too, coming from the quirky mind of then-producer Creator/JayWolpert), and new gameplay elements such as the Big Wheel were added as well.



** Carey himself in his third year as host--he noticeably slowed down his MotorMouth tendencies, and also found his own niche in terms of participating with the contestants in pricing games, including his own catchphrases (such as "Give it to [him/her]!" when revealing the result of a game).

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** Carey himself in his third year as host--he host - he noticeably slowed down his MotorMouth tendencies, and also found his own niche in terms of participating with the contestants in pricing games, including his own catchphrases (such as "Give it to [him/her]!" when revealing the result of a game). game).



* ItsEasySoItSucks: The current incarnation of "Bullseye" is essentially "Grocery Game: Easy Mode". Victory is based on individual products instead of a running total (thus avoiding the UnwinnableByMistake situations that plague "Grocery Game"), the margin of error is doubled, and the second chance only serves to make it even easier since as long as you don't go over (which can be assured by going with no more than 2 of each product), you have a 60% chance of winning just with that. It's a bit ironic, actually, since the original "Bullseye" gained notoriety for being virtually {{Unwinnable}}.

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* ItsEasySoItSucks: The current incarnation of "Bullseye" Bullseye is essentially "Grocery Game: Easy Mode". Victory is based on individual products instead of a running total (thus avoiding the UnwinnableByMistake situations that plague "Grocery Game"), the margin of error is doubled, and the second chance only serves to make it even easier since as long as you don't go over (which can be assured by going with no more than 2 of each product), you have a 60% chance of winning just with that. It's a bit ironic, actually, since the original "Bullseye" gained notoriety for being virtually {{Unwinnable}}.



** Likewise, some people blame Creator/FremantleMedia for announcers not appearing on camera from 2000 until 2008.
** Bob Barker has been largely blamed for the termination of longtime model Janice Pennington, who was supposedly let go in 2000 for not testifying against Holly Hallstrom in her lawsuit against Barker. Despite this, however, Pennington later opened up on a MySpace post, where she mentioned to her colleagues that she was let go by the network, and not Barker himself.

to:

** Likewise, some people blame Creator/FremantleMedia for announcers not appearing on camera on-camera from 2000 until 2008.
2002-08. That was actually Barker's doing, though Fremantle took the heat by claiming it was a new worldwide policy.
** Bob Barker has been largely blamed for the termination of longtime model Janice Pennington, who was supposedly let go in 2000 for not testifying against Holly Hallstrom in her lawsuit against Barker. Despite this, however, Pennington later opened up on a MySpace post, where she mentioned to her colleagues that she was let go by the network, network and not Barker himself.himself (though it's possible CBS was JustFollowingOrders).



** The short-lived pricing game "Split Decision" has a reputation for being the game where ''nothing'' worked right and the board was constantly falling apart. In truth, there was ''one'' playing where two of the numbers fell off their markers (a rule change taking place on the game's next occurrence likely because its clock broke didn't help matters). The game's short life was due to the fact that contestants simply had trouble understanding the rules.
** The many backstage turmoils that former host Bob Barker had with practically the entire staff, particularly after he became executive producer in TheEighties. Never mind that he hosted said show for a staggering 35 years — one of the longest runs ever for any TV host — and already had 18 years of ''Series/TruthOrConsequences'' under his belt on top of that.

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** The short-lived pricing game "Split Decision" has a reputation for being the game where ''nothing'' worked right and the board was constantly falling apart. In truth, there was ''one'' playing where two of the numbers fell off their markers (a rule change taking place on the game's next occurrence occurrence, likely because its clock broke broke, didn't help matters). The game's short life was due to the fact that contestants simply had trouble understanding the rules.
** The many backstage turmoils that former host Bob Barker had with practically the entire staff, particularly after he became executive producer in TheEighties. Never mind that he hosted said show for a staggering 35 years — one of the longest runs ever for any TV host — and already had 18 16 years of ''Series/TruthOrConsequences'' under his belt on top of that.



** The version of Cliff Hangers from Bruce's in the UK. When a contestant loses, the mountain climber is heard screaming for five seconds just after he falls.

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** The version of Cliff Hangers from Bruce's in the UK.Bruce Forsyth era of the British franchise. When a contestant loses, the mountain climber is heard screaming for five seconds just after he falls.



* OvershadowedByControversy: Terry Kneiss' perfect showcase bid. Drew immediately suspected him of cheating from the get go, dropping his voice when he read the price. The producers backed up his claim by initiating a 20-minute stopdown to investigate. It turns he was just a loyal watcher of the show and that he got his prices from a Golden-Road.net user in the audience who had been on the show before.

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* OvershadowedByControversy: Terry Kneiss' perfect showcase Showcase bid. Drew immediately suspected him of cheating from cheating, reading the get go, dropping his voice when he read the price.price with zero emotion. The producers backed up his claim by initiating a 20-minute stopdown to investigate. It turns he was just a loyal watcher of the show and that he got his prices the Showcase price from a Golden-Road.net user member in the audience who had been on the show before.before and in the audience quite a few times. [[DownerEnding Said Golden-Road user was also immediately banned from the show afterward.]]



** The producers noticed a surge in popularity after Barker appeared in ''Film/HappyGilmore'' as himself in a Pro/AM golf tournament, getting paired up with (and later beating the everloving crap out of) Sandler's titular character.

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** The producers noticed a surge in popularity after Barker appeared in ''Film/HappyGilmore'' as himself in a Pro/AM golf tournament, getting paired up with (and later beating the everloving crap out of) Sandler's titular character. It also helped that Bob got to invoke ThisIsForEmphasisBitch.



*** There's absolutely no love for Daniel Rosen. He was ''hated'' for his flat, nasal delivery, which was almost always completely devoid of enthusiasm. One episode circulating on Website/YouTube has him begin the OpeningNarration with a very audible "uh", while another has him completely deflate the introduction to Punch-a-Bunch. At least two eyewitnesses have said that he had to redo some of the copy in post because no one could hear him! He sometimes came across as if he were trying to imitate Rod, most notably in wearing colorful suits and even going so far as to sign off as "Daaaaaaaaaaaniel Rosen", similarly to how Rod would drag out his first name when signing off. Rosen was further hated after supposedly infecting popular fan forum Golden-Road.net with multiple {{sockpuppet}} accounts who proceeded to [[AstroTurf banter about how good his announcing was]] despite both the site's legit members and the show's own staff having no kind words for him. Apparently he has gotten a little better, as he sometimes handles the ''Price Is Right Live!'' productions at Harrah's, although some eyewitnesses say that he is very arrogant there too.

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*** There's absolutely no love for Daniel Rosen. He was ''hated'' for his flat, nasal delivery, which was almost always completely devoid of enthusiasm. One episode circulating on Website/YouTube has him begin the OpeningNarration with a very audible "uh", while another has him completely deflate the introduction to Punch-a-Bunch.Punch-A-Bunch. At least two eyewitnesses have said that he had to redo some of the copy in post because no one could hear him! He sometimes came across as if he were trying to imitate Rod, most notably in wearing colorful suits and even going so far as to sign off as "Daaaaaaaaaaaniel Rosen", similarly to how Rod would drag out his first name when signing off. Rosen was further hated after supposedly infecting popular fan forum Golden-Road.net with multiple {{sockpuppet}} accounts who proceeded to [[AstroTurf banter about how good his announcing was]] despite both the site's legit members and the show's own staff having no kind words for him. Apparently he has he's gotten a little better, as he sometimes handles the ''Price Is Right Live!'' productions at Harrah's, although some eyewitnesses say that he is he's very arrogant there too.



*** Don Bishop was decent, but lost major points with the fans for never interacting with Bob. Bob tried pretty hard to get Don to interact with him, but even lines such as "Don, I need a winner. Can you get me a ''winner'' this time?" only got the standard-script response of "[Name], come on down."

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*** Don Bishop was decent, but lost major points with the fans for never interacting with Bob. Bob To Barker's credit, he tried pretty hard to get Don to interact with him, but even lines such as "Don, I need a winner. Can you get me a ''winner'' this time?" only got the standard-script standard script response of "[Name], come on down."



** Then Rich Fields started to become a victim of this — many simply disliked that he got picked over Randy West, in part because of Randy's major connections to the fanbase, and in part because some just didn't like Rich's style (particularly in later episodes, where he developed a nasty case of NoIndoorVoice). Creator/FremantleMedia was reportedly not that fond of Rich in the first place, and would've kicked him out when Barker left had he and Roger Dobkowitz not stepped in. Rich ended up being fired after Season 38, supposedly due to matters unrelated to the show, although the producers supposedly wanted to seek out a replacement with experience in comedy.

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** Then Rich Fields started to become a victim of this — many simply disliked that he got picked over Randy West, in part because of Randy's major connections to the fanbase, and in part because some just didn't like Rich's style (particularly in later episodes, Seasons 37-38, where he developed a nasty case of NoIndoorVoice). Creator/FremantleMedia was reportedly not that fond of Rich in the first place, and would've kicked him out when after Season 35 had Barker left had he and Roger Dobkowitz not stepped in. Rich ended up being fired after Season 38, supposedly due to matters unrelated to the show, although the producers supposedly wanted to seek out a replacement with experience in comedy.show.



** Bart Eskander, who replaced Paul Alter, is generally cited as The Price is Right's worst director due to his oversimplifying of camera angles (e.g. not showing Bonus Game as it spins on the turntable).

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** Bart Eskander, who replaced Paul Alter, is generally cited as The Price is Right's the show's worst director due to his oversimplifying of camera angles (e.g. not showing Bonus Game as it spins on the turntable).Turntable). It didn't help when, in Season 37 (the first season in HD/widescreen), he managed to shoot the climactic reveal for Lucky $even with the last digit ''outside the standard-definition "safe zone"''.



** In the inaugural week of celebrity specials (where guest stars would help contestants with pricing games), one of the participants was Jenny [=McCarthy=] who played for Generation Rescue[[note]]a charity that backs a claim that vaccines cause autism[[/note]]. Needless to say, the [[InternetBackdraft online community was not pleased]]. Even less so when Mike Richards invited her because she's "a great advocate for what she believes in".
** Season 44 had a College Rivals/March Madness Special with drastically altered rules. Two pairs of students from different rival colleges were called down to Contestant's Row. The winner of the One Bid came on stage to play the pricing game and the rival was ''[[UnPerson sent back to the audience]]''. [[SarcasmMode It gets better]]; if the pricing game was lost, the rival pocketed $1,000. Then, another pair of rivals were called down which became the norm for the rest of the show. Fans denounced the special for stooping so low and encouraging a mean-spirited atmosphere. Unfortunately, the staff didn't get the hint and the show is now making these specials an annual occurrence.

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** In the inaugural week of celebrity specials Celebrity Week (where guest stars would help contestants with pricing games), one of the participants was Jenny [=McCarthy=] [=McCarthy=], who played for Generation Rescue[[note]]a Rescue [[note]](a charity that backs a the scientifically-discredited claim that vaccines cause autism[[/note]].autism)[[/note]]. Needless to say, the [[InternetBackdraft online community was not pleased]]. Even less so when Mike Richards admitted that he invited her because she's "a great advocate for what she believes in".
** Season 44 had a College Rivals/March Madness Special with drastically altered rules. Two rules: two pairs of students from different rival colleges were called down to Contestant's Row. The winner of the One Bid One-Bid came on stage onstage to play the a pricing game game, and the their rival was ''[[UnPerson sent back to the audience]]''. [[SarcasmMode It gets better]]; better]]: if the pricing game was lost, the rival pocketed $1,000. Then, another pair of rivals were called down which became the norm for the rest of the show. Fans denounced the special for stooping so low and encouraging a mean-spirited atmosphere. Unfortunately, the staff didn't get the hint and the show is now making these specials an annual occurrence.



*** Any game that can still be lost if the pricing portion is played perfectly. Drew didn't like this, so Roger altered ½ Off to award $500 for getting any pair of items (later changed to $1,000 for winning all three pairs) and retired Joker (which had been scheduled to return in February 2008 and is another Scrappy game amongst big name ''Price'' fans for also being ugly.) to avoid another confrontation.
*** Professor Price stood no chance of succeeding once the audience found out they weren't allowed to help out the contestant...like in nearly every other pricing game. It also came with a new ruleset that required trivia, a big no-no on ''Price'' since, and became immediate SnarkBait for having a puppet design that looked like it was FlippingTheBird. It got played twice (and won both times), the least amount of times a game has been played, and the professor was quickly sent to the retirement home in CBS's "vault of bad ideas"; this game made the #100 spot in David Hofstede's book ''Literature/WhatWereTheyThinkingThe100DumbestEventsInTelevisionHistory'' (which also includes the [[TropeNamer Trope]] [[WesternAnimation/ScoobyDoo Namer]]).

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*** Any game that can still be lost if the pricing portion is played perfectly. Drew didn't like this, so Roger altered ½ Off to award $500 for getting any pair of items (later changed to $1,000 for winning all three pairs) and retired Joker (which had been scheduled to return in February 2008 and is another Scrappy game amongst big name ''Price'' fans for also being ugly.) ugly) to avoid another confrontation.
*** Professor Price stood no chance of succeeding once the audience found out they weren't allowed to help out the contestant...like in nearly every other pricing game. It also came with a new ruleset that required trivia, a big no-no on ''Price'' since, and became immediate SnarkBait for having a puppet design that looked like it was FlippingTheBird. It got played twice (and won both times), the least amount of times a game has been played, and the professor was quickly sent to the retirement home in CBS's CBS' "vault of bad ideas"; this game made the #100 spot in David Hofstede's book ''Literature/WhatWereTheyThinkingThe100DumbestEventsInTelevisionHistory'' (which also includes the [[TropeNamer Trope]] [[WesternAnimation/ScoobyDoo Namer]]).



*** Pay the Rent exemplifies this trope, introduced as [[ItsHardSoItSucks too difficult]] and nigh {{Unwinnable}} with only [[NintendoHard one way to win the $100,000 top prize]]. The extra bells and whistles did not help its cause along with Drew even [[TakeThat remarking how awful the game was on camera]]. To the staff's credit, they did make Pay the Rent easier until someone finally won the grand prize, at which point they reverted it to its old ways again.

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*** Pay the Rent exemplifies this trope, introduced as [[ItsHardSoItSucks too difficult]] and nigh {{Unwinnable}} with only [[NintendoHard one way to win the $100,000 top prize]]. The extra bells and whistles did not help its cause along with Drew even [[TakeThat remarking how awful the game was on camera]].on-camera]]. To the staff's credit, they did make Pay the Rent easier until someone finally won the grand prize, at which point they reverted it to its old ways again.



*** Several games were put on lengthy hiatus, including Triple Play, four-prize games, Credit Card (the only five-prizer), and Dice Game. Credit Card still hasn't come back.
*** To be fair, Credit Card may have been axed for being the exact inverse of Shopping Spree (the latter is essentially "avoid the least expensive prize", while the former is basically "avoid the most expensive prize").

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*** Several games were put on lengthy hiatus, including Triple Play, four-prize games, Credit Card (the only five-prizer), and Dice Game. Credit Card still hasn't come back.
*** To
back, though to be fair, Credit Card may have been fair it was probably axed for being the exact inverse because of Shopping Spree (the latter is essentially "avoid the least expensive prize", while the former is basically "avoid the most expensive prize").how long it took to describe all five prizes.



*** An increase in contestants who look like they've never even seen the show before; a practice that continues to this day. Never mind that the current version of the show has been on the air for almost ''half a century''.

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*** An increase in contestants who look like they've never even seen the show before; before, a practice that continues to this day. Never mind that the current version of the show has been on the air for almost ''half a century''.



** Danger Price in one instance had ''two'' prices revealed at the same time when the model pressed only one button to reveal one price. Both of the prices revealed were "correct" (as in not being the titular price to avoid) and Drew had to allow the contestant to keep the freebie, making the game easier for him. The debut of the game's current setup ironically had a similar incident in the nighttime 1986 specials, where the last "safe" price turned around on its own and netted the contestant an immediate win.

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** Danger Price in one instance had ''two'' prices revealed at the same time when the model pressed only one button to reveal one price. Both of the prices revealed were "correct" (as in not being the titular price to avoid) and Drew had to allow the contestant to keep the freebie, making the game easier for him. The debut of the game's current setup ironically had a similar incident in the 1986 nighttime 1986 specials, where the last "safe" price turned around on its own and netted the contestant an immediate win.



* TaintedByThePreview: As the Mike Richards era progressed, a staggering amount of promos have aired spoiling the results of pricing games and even the showcases. Fans express resentment for these as they further reduce the spontaneous nature of the show.

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* TaintedByThePreview: As the Mike Richards era progressed, a staggering amount of promos have aired spoiling the results of pricing games and even the showcases.Showcases. Fans express resentment for these as they further reduce the spontaneous nature of the show.



** Bullseye '72 is probably the only universally accepted example of this, being [[{{Unwinnable}} lost every one of the five times it was played]]; it was later jury-rigged to become the two-contestant Double Bullseye that forced a win, but that just didn't work either so they canned it. Some more subjective examples are That's Too Much! (current game), Fortune Hunter, Step Up (current game), and Mystery Price [[note]](which performed the best out of this group, having been won on 11 of its 17 playings)[[/note]].
** [[InvertedTrope Inverted]] by pricing games that are apparently [[ItsEasySoItSucks hated for being too easy]], such as Pick-A-Number, but played straight when it's set up in ways considered unfair by fans (i.e. having to guess the ''second-last number in a price'')

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** Bullseye '72 is probably the only universally accepted example of this, being [[{{Unwinnable}} lost every one of the five times it was played]]; it was later jury-rigged to become reworked into the two-contestant Double Bullseye that forced a win, but that just didn't work either so they canned it. Some more subjective examples are That's Too Much! (current game), Fortune Hunter, Step Up (current game), and Mystery Price [[note]](which performed the best out of this group, having been won on 11 of its 17 playings)[[/note]].
** [[InvertedTrope Inverted]] by pricing games that are apparently [[ItsEasySoItSucks hated for being too easy]], such as Pick-A-Number, but played straight when it's set up in ways considered unfair by fans (i.e. having to guess the ''second-last number in a price'')price'').



*** Originally (Seasons 39-40), Pay the Rent had just one solution. As Season 41 progressed, the game became progressively easier to win in what was clearly a "[[Series/DealOrNoDeal $100,000]] [[Series/MinuteToWinIt Mission]]", and when it finally ''was'' won the game had gotten to having around 13 solutions. Unsurprisingly, they went right back to having one solution on its next playing.

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*** Originally (Seasons 39-40), Pay the Rent had just one solution.solution per playing. As Season 41 progressed, the game became progressively easier to win in what was clearly a "[[Series/DealOrNoDeal $100,000]] [[Series/MinuteToWinIt Mission]]", and when it finally ''was'' won the game had gotten to having around 13 solutions. Unsurprisingly, they went right back to having one solution on its next playing.



** The reverse product placement, done because the items in question aren't sponsored (i.e., provided for free or at reduced price by the company). So, instead of plugging a jar of Jif peanut butter, the announcer instead says something generic like "Peanut butter makes a delightful snack!"

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*** The reason why grandfather clocks aren't offered anymore? [[https://editorial.rottentomatoes.com/article/14-things-we-learned-on-the-set-of-the-price-is-right/ According to Mike Richards]], it's because "no one would buy Drew Carey as a grandfather clock-owner, so it doesn’t work as a prize on the show." No, seriously.
** The reverse product placement, done because the items in question aren't sponsored (i.e., provided for free or at reduced price by the company). So, instead of plugging a jar of Jif peanut butter, the announcer instead says something generic mentions the container's size or contents (in this case, "A 12-ounce jar of peanut butter.")...which is ''far'' better than the inane lines like "Peanut butter makes a delightful snack!"snack!" that were used for a while.



*** The majority of the proceedings were a gigantic advertisement for the department store chain Big W (comparable to Walmart). Every grocery item or prize was promoted as being "[[EnforcedPlug provided]]" by Big W, and Plinko and Wonderwall (aka Punch-A-Bunch), both normally played for cash, were instead played for Big W "shopping sprees" (read: store credit).
*** The show pretty obviously suffered from a severe case of NoBudget — the pricing games not only looked cheap and never bothered to have their names on the props (Cliffhangers being a particularly good example), but almost all of the prize budget was put into the Showcase, including any cars at all. Sure, this had been the case on prior versions, but at least on those the pricing games offered substantial prizes, as well as the legendary, $500,000+ "Mega Showcase". Cash was '''never''' offered during the show's run; the aforementioned Big W shopping sprees were worth $3,000, and all other pricing game prizes were less than $2,000 in value.

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*** The majority of the proceedings were a gigantic advertisement for the department store chain Big W (comparable to Walmart). Every grocery item or prize was promoted as being "[[EnforcedPlug provided]]" by Big W, and Plinko and Wonderwall (aka Punch-A-Bunch), both normally played for cash, were instead played for Big W "shopping sprees" (read: store credit).
*** The show pretty obviously suffered from a severe case of NoBudget — the pricing games not only looked cheap and never bothered to have their names on the props (Cliffhangers being a particularly good example), glaring example, with its set not even bothering to have the top portion ''without'' the name, making the prop look ''outright unfinished''), but almost all of the prize budget was put into the Showcase, including any cars at all. Sure, this had been the case on prior versions, but at least on those the pricing games offered substantial prizes, as well as the legendary, legendary $500,000+ "Mega Showcase". Cash was '''never''' offered during the show's run; 2012 run: the aforementioned Big W shopping sprees were worth $3,000, and all other pricing game prizes were less than $2,000 in value.



* VindicatedByHistory: ''The New Price Is Right'' with Doug Davidson. At the time, fans of ''Price'' decried its many changes mentioned at TheyChangedItNowItSucks. Nowadays, it's seen as a decent companion to the daytime version that was cut short due to the OJ Simpson news coverage.

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* VindicatedByHistory: ''The New Price Is Right'' with The Doug Davidson.Davidson version. At the time, fans of ''Price'' decried its many changes mentioned at TheyChangedItNowItSucks. Nowadays, it's seen as a decent companion to the daytime version that dared to try something different from the standard ''Price'' formula and was pretty much cut short due to the OJ Simpson news coverage.
3rd Dec '16 8:36:15 PM loyalmoonie
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** The firing of longtime model Janice Pennington in 2000. Despite being with the show since the pilot episode in 1972, Pennington was fired by Bob Barker without any kind of on-air send off usually reserved for departing models after she refused to testify against Holly Hallstrom, who had filed a wrongful termination lawsuit against Barker after being fired for equally trivial reasons in 1995. This caused a huge uproar among the show's fanbase and forever tarnished Barker's public image.

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** The firing of longtime model Janice Pennington in 2000. Despite being Having been with the show since the pilot episode in 1972, Pennington was fired by Bob Barker without any kind of on-air send off usually reserved for departing models after she refused to testify against Holly Hallstrom, who had filed a wrongful termination lawsuit against Barker after being fired for equally trivial reasons in 1995. This caused a huge uproar among the show's fanbase and forever had tarnished Barker's public image. Despite this, Pennington later stated in a MySpace post that she was let go by CBS, not by Barker.



* InternetBackdraft: Go to any TV-related forum and mention Barker or Carey, then run for the hills and watch the fur fly. Some forums have a hard time with topics on this show in general because of fears it may quickly degenerate into a "Barker/Carey Sucks/Rocks"-fest.

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* InternetBackdraft: Go to any TV-related forum and mention Barker or Carey, then run for the hills and watch the fur fly. Some forums have a hard time with topics on this show in general because of fears it may quickly degenerate into a "Barker/Carey Sucks/Rocks"-fest. In some instances, it may also turn into an anti-Barker conversation with some fans who are still upset about Bob Barker's scandals.



* {{Jerkass}}: How many view Bob Barker now that the nightmare stories of his backstage antics are well known, especially regarding the '''horrible''' way he treated the models. It began in TheNineties with the Dian Parkinson lawsuit, gained steam when he fired longtime model Holly Hallstrom without giving her any kind of on air send off (Barker usually announces a model's departure during one of their last shows and sometimes allows them to bid a farewell to the audience) because she refused to testify on his behalf in regards to the Parkinson lawsuit. Then when Hallstrom sued Barker for discrimination and wrongful termination, he fired model Janice Pennington - who had been modeling for the show since '''the 1972 pilot episode''' - again without giving her any kind of on-air send off, because she refused to testify against Hallstrom. This caused a uproar among the fanbase and forever tarnished Barker's public image. The racial discrimination lawsuit which arguably cost him his job and the Betty White controversy in retirement hasn't helped, either.
** Those who view Barker this way tend to be more sympathetic to successor Drew Carey. They feel that what he lacks in terms of Barker's charisma and showmanship, he makes up for with his much better treatment of the backstage staff and all he has done to humanize the models and further integrate them into the show.



** Likewise, some people blame Creator/FremantleMedia for announcers not appearing on camera from 2000 until 2008. That was Bob Barker's idea.

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** Likewise, some people blame Creator/FremantleMedia for announcers not appearing on camera from 2000 until 2008. That 2008.
** Bob Barker has been largely blamed for the termination of longtime model Janice Pennington, who
was Bob Barker's idea.supposedly let go in 2000 for not testifying against Holly Hallstrom in her lawsuit against Barker. Despite this, however, Pennington later opened up on a MySpace post, where she mentioned to her colleagues that she was let go by the network, and not Barker himself.



* TheWoobie:
** Holly Hallstrom. After Barker repeatedly demeaned her for gaining a trivial amount of weight as a side effect from prescription medication, her 18 year career modeling for The Price is Right was brought to an abrupt end in 1995 when Barker fired her without any kind of on-air send off because she refused to more-or-less commit perjury on his behalf. She would file a wrongful termination lawsuit against him for it and the subsequent court battle dragged on for ten years, ruining her career, bankrupting her and making her homeless for a period of time in the process. When asked why she willingly ruined her life to pursue the lawsuit, Hallstrom stated it was because she wanted to bring Barker to justice for his horrible treatment of the backstage staff and models, and being that she was unmarried and childless she felt she was the only one who could face Barker down in court. Indeed, Dian Parkinson was forced to drop her lawsuit against Barker when the emotional distress it brought began destroying her health. Hallstrom's efforts eventually paid off; she received a multimillion dollar settlement and the lawsuit did permanent damage to Barker's reputation.
** The fanbase feels this way towards Janice Pennington as well, due to how she was fired from the show without any kind of send off whatsoever because she refused to commit perjury on Barker's behalf in regards to Holly Hallstrom's wrongful termination lawsuit. The incident caused a uproar amongst the fanbase and is a big reason why Hallstrom's lawsuit did as much damage as it did to Barker's public image. Pennington herself would sue Barker for wrongful termination and would receive a cash settlement as well as a hush clause.
31st Oct '16 12:38:46 PM Twentington
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*** There's absolutely no love for Daniel Rosen. On his first episodes, he had the enthusiasm of a sloth on [=NyQuil=] and didn't interact with Bob. While he got slightly better, his attempts at "enthusiasm" sounded painfully fake, and he sometimes came across as if he were trying to imitate Rod (even going so far as to sign off as "Daaaaaaaaaaaniel Rosen", similarly to how Rod would drag out his first name when signing off). Even his audience warm-ups must have been terrible, as the usually raucous audience sounds unnervingly quiet. Rosen was further hated after infecting popular fan forum Golden-Road.net with multiple {{sockpuppet}} accounts who proceeded to [[AstroTurf banter about how good his announcing was]] despite both the site's legit members and the show's own staff having no kind words for him. (To his credit, Rosen got a ''lot'' better during the [[http://www.priceisrightlive.com/ live stage shows]] at Harrah's.)

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*** There's absolutely no love for Daniel Rosen. On He was ''hated'' for his first episodes, flat, nasal delivery, which was almost always completely devoid of enthusiasm. One episode circulating on Website/YouTube has him begin the OpeningNarration with a very audible "uh", while another has him completely deflate the introduction to Punch-a-Bunch. At least two eyewitnesses have said that he had to redo some of the enthusiasm of a sloth on [=NyQuil=] and didn't interact with Bob. While he got slightly better, his attempts at "enthusiasm" sounded painfully fake, and he copy in post because no one could hear him! He sometimes came across as if he were trying to imitate Rod (even Rod, most notably in wearing colorful suits and even going so far as to sign off as "Daaaaaaaaaaaniel Rosen", similarly to how Rod would drag out his first name when signing off). Even his audience warm-ups must have been terrible, as the usually raucous audience sounds unnervingly quiet. off. Rosen was further hated after supposedly infecting popular fan forum Golden-Road.net with multiple {{sockpuppet}} accounts who proceeded to [[AstroTurf banter about how good his announcing was]] despite both the site's legit members and the show's own staff having no kind words for him. (To his credit, Rosen got Apparently he has gotten a ''lot'' better during little better, as he sometimes handles the [[http://www.priceisrightlive.com/ live stage shows]] ''Price Is Right Live!'' productions at Harrah's.)Harrah's, although some eyewitnesses say that he is very arrogant there too.
19th Oct '16 6:33:48 PM KoopaKid17
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** Season 44 had a College Rivals/March Madness Special with drastically altered rules. Two pairs of students from different rival colleges were called down to Contestant's Row. The winner of the One Bid came on stage to play the pricing game and the rival was ''[[UnPerson sent back to the audience]]''. [[SarcasmMode It gets better]]; if the pricing game was lost, the rival pocketed $1,000. Then, another pair of rivals were called down which became the norm for the rest of the show. Fans denounced the special for stooping so low and encouraging a mean-spirited atmosphere. Unfortunately, the staff didn't get the hint as ''five'' of these episodes were ordered for Season 45.

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** Season 44 had a College Rivals/March Madness Special with drastically altered rules. Two pairs of students from different rival colleges were called down to Contestant's Row. The winner of the One Bid came on stage to play the pricing game and the rival was ''[[UnPerson sent back to the audience]]''. [[SarcasmMode It gets better]]; if the pricing game was lost, the rival pocketed $1,000. Then, another pair of rivals were called down which became the norm for the rest of the show. Fans denounced the special for stooping so low and encouraging a mean-spirited atmosphere. Unfortunately, the staff didn't get the hint as ''five'' of and the show is now making these episodes were ordered for Season 45.specials an annual occurrence.
18th Oct '16 6:12:12 PM themisterfree
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** If you get called down, ''don't'' make joke bids like $420 or anything ending in 69--fans will never forgive you for wasting a spot in Contestant's Row if you do (and neither will the producers, Viacom or CBS; one contestant who kept making bids like these plus a $2,000,000 bid got the episode he appeared on banned from reairing; this guy is detailed on the [[WhatAnIdiot/ThePriceIsRight What An Idiot]] page).

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** If you get called down, ''don't'' make joke bids like $420 or anything ending in 69--fans will never forgive you for wasting a spot in Contestant's Row if you do (and neither will the producers, Viacom Fremantle or CBS; one contestant who kept making bids like these plus a $2,000,000 bid got the episode he appeared on banned from reairing; this guy is detailed on the [[WhatAnIdiot/ThePriceIsRight What An Idiot]] page).
15th Oct '16 9:41:03 AM KoopaKid17
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Added DiffLines:

* NeverLiveItDown:
** The short-lived pricing game "Split Decision" has a reputation for being the game where ''nothing'' worked right and the board was constantly falling apart. In truth, there was ''one'' playing where two of the numbers fell off their markers (a rule change taking place on the game's next occurrence likely because its clock broke didn't help matters). The game's short life was due to the fact that contestants simply had trouble understanding the rules.
** The many backstage turmoils that former host Bob Barker had with practically the entire staff, particularly after he became executive producer in TheEighties. Never mind that he hosted said show for a staggering 35 years — one of the longest runs ever for any TV host — and already had 18 years of ''Series/TruthOrConsequences'' under his belt on top of that.
7th Oct '16 5:25:12 PM KoopaKid17
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** Season 44 had a College Rivals/March Madness Special with drastically altered rules. Two pairs of students different from rival colleges were called down to Contestant's Row. The winner of the One Bid came on stage to play the pricing game and the rival was ''[[UnPerson sent back to the audience]]''. [[SarcasmMode It gets better]]; if the pricing game was lost, the rival pocketed $1,000. Then, another pair of rivals were called down which became the norm for the rest of the show. Fans denounced the special for stooping so low and encouraging a mean-spirited atmosphere. Unfortunately, the staff didn't get the hint as ''five'' of these episodes were ordered for Season 45.

to:

** Season 44 had a College Rivals/March Madness Special with drastically altered rules. Two pairs of students from different from rival colleges were called down to Contestant's Row. The winner of the One Bid came on stage to play the pricing game and the rival was ''[[UnPerson sent back to the audience]]''. [[SarcasmMode It gets better]]; if the pricing game was lost, the rival pocketed $1,000. Then, another pair of rivals were called down which became the norm for the rest of the show. Fans denounced the special for stooping so low and encouraging a mean-spirited atmosphere. Unfortunately, the staff didn't get the hint as ''five'' of these episodes were ordered for Season 45.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=YMMV.ThePriceIsRight