History YMMV / ThePriceIsRight

20th Jul '17 9:47:55 AM KoopaKid17
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*** The reason why grandfather clocks aren't offered anymore? [[https://editorial.rottentomatoes.com/article/14-things-we-learned-on-the-set-of-the-price-is-right/ According to Mike Richards]], it's because "no one would buy Drew Carey as a grandfather clock-owner, so it doesn’t work as a prize on the show." No, seriously.

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*** The reason why grandfather clocks aren't offered anymore? [[https://editorial.rottentomatoes.com/article/14-things-we-learned-on-the-set-of-the-price-is-right/ According to Mike Richards]], it's because "no "[[InsaneTrollLogic no one would buy Drew Carey as a grandfather clock-owner, so it doesn’t work as a prize on the show.show]]." No, seriously.
4th Jul '17 9:07:27 AM KoopaKid17
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** Fremantle also takes heat for a lot of the format changes that have happened under the Drew Carey era, such as set changes, couples shows, themed specials and celebrity players. In actuality, CBS is the driving force behind all these. They even tried to push them when Bob Barker was still hosting, but since Barker was also executive producer at the time, he would not allow it.

to:

** Fremantle also takes heat for a lot of the format changes that have happened under the Drew Carey era, such as set changes, updates, couples shows, themed specials and celebrity players. In actuality, CBS is the driving force behind all these. They even tried to push them when Bob Barker was still hosting, but since Barker was also executive producer at the time, he would not allow it.
27th Jun '17 10:49:13 PM MeltingPotOfFriendship
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*** Since Season 39 (2010-2011), the correct answer has never been the second nor ninth price. This was because during the 2009-2010 season, the right answer was almost always the second or ninth price, which skewed a Roger Dobkowitz-era rule that the correct answer almost always fell between slots 3 and 8 (and then, more often than not, was usually the fifth or sixth prices), eventually making contestants and fans complain … and then a couple of smart contestants foiled the prevailing "either second or ninth" setup.[[/note]]

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*** Since Season 39 (2010-2011), the correct answer has never been the second nor ninth price. This [[note]]This was because during the 2009-2010 season, the right answer was almost always the second or ninth price, which skewed a Roger Dobkowitz-era rule that the correct answer almost always fell between slots 3 and 8 (and then, more often than not, was usually the fifth or sixth prices), eventually making contestants and fans complain … and then a couple of smart contestants foiled the prevailing "either second or ninth" setup.[[/note]]
27th Jun '17 10:46:16 PM MeltingPotOfFriendship
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* GameBreaker: A number of the games had different quirks where strategy was a key part in winning a game, as opposed to mere guessing games or where pricing/consumer knowledge was required. [[note]](Except for Clock Game, where binary search was always the way to win, the unwritten rules for many of these games were not always in place, only going in somewhere in 1979 or 1980, when Roger Dobkowitz was in charge of setting up most of the games.) Examples:

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* GameBreaker: A number of the games had different quirks where strategy was a key part in winning a game, as opposed to mere guessing games or where pricing/consumer knowledge was required. [[note]](Except (Except for Clock Game, where binary search was always the way to win, the unwritten rules for many of these games were not always in place, only going in somewhere in 1979 or 1980, when Roger Dobkowitz was in charge of setting up most of the games.) Examples:
27th Jun '17 10:45:53 PM MeltingPotOfFriendship
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* GameBreaker: A number of the games had different quirks where strategy was a key part in winning a game, as opposed to mere guessing games or where pricing/consumer knowledge was required. [[note]](Except for Clock Game, where binary search was always the way to win, the unwritten rules for many of these games were not always in place, only going in somewhere in 1979 or 1980, when Roger Dobkowitz was in charge of setting up most of the games.)[[/note]] Examples:

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* GameBreaker: A number of the games had different quirks where strategy was a key part in winning a game, as opposed to mere guessing games or where pricing/consumer knowledge was required. [[note]](Except for Clock Game, where binary search was always the way to win, the unwritten rules for many of these games were not always in place, only going in somewhere in 1979 or 1980, when Roger Dobkowitz was in charge of setting up most of the games.)[[/note]] ) Examples:



** '''Car games in general''': Listen to the car's options. If "paint and fabric protection" is mentioned as an option, the car's final digit can be any number between 0 and 9. But if "paint and fabric protection" is not mentioned as an option, the last digit of the car is almost always 0 or 5.

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** '''Car games in general''': Listen to the car's options. If "paint and fabric protection" is mentioned as an option, the car's final digit can be any number between 0 and 9.9 (except for Temptation and 10 Chances, whose unwritten rules still apply). But if "paint and fabric protection" is not mentioned as an option, the last digit of the car is almost always 0 or 5.



** '''Freeze Frame''': Seemingly a difficult game (with 1:8 odds), the game becomes much easier once obviously high and low prices are eliminated (e.g, if one of the number pairs is "11" or "22," those are never the first two digits in the price). Another trick is to pay attention to the starting position of the rotating wheel. Once the fifth number pair appears in the viewfinder, unless it is an obviously low price, that one statistically has the correct answer.



*** In recent seasons, the game has become notorious for having ridiculously large ranges between the two prizes (the worst example being a June 2016 playing that had a $3,000 TV and a $9,000 barbecue island).

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*** In recent seasons, the game has become notorious for having ridiculously large ranges spreads between the two prizes (the worst example being a June 2016 playing that had a $3,000 $2,970 TV and a $9,000 $8,990 barbecue island).



** '''Push Over''': The first price shown is never correct, since it breaks the game's spirit (you don't have to "push over" any blocks).

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** '''Push Over''': The first price shown is never correct, since it breaks goes against the game's spirit (you don't have to "push over" any blocks).
27th Jun '17 10:39:50 PM MeltingPotOfFriendship
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** All pricing games in general: Since at least Season 44 (2015-2016), all pricing games have prize packages that are worth at least $5,000 in total. This is especially helpful with games that only have one prize, such as Freeze Frame and Push Over.
** Car games in general: Listen to the car's options. If "paint and fabric protection" is mentioned as an option, the car's final digit can be any number between 0 and 9. But if "paint and fabric protection" is not mentioned as an option, the last digit of the car is almost always 0 or 5.

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** All '''All pricing games in general: general''': Since at least Season 44 (2015-2016), all pricing games have prize packages that are worth at least $5,000 in total. This is especially helpful with games that only have one prize, such as Freeze Frame and Push Over.
** Car '''Car games in general: general''': Listen to the car's options. If "paint and fabric protection" is mentioned as an option, the car's final digit can be any number between 0 and 9. But if "paint and fabric protection" is not mentioned as an option, the last digit of the car is almost always 0 or 5.
27th Jun '17 10:38:42 PM MeltingPotOfFriendship
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** '''Bargain Game''': The item with the lowest-displayed price is the correct item 75 percent of the time.

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** '''Bargain Game''': The item All pricing games in general: Since at least Season 44 (2015-2016), all pricing games have prize packages that are worth at least $5,000 in total. This is especially helpful with games that only have one prize, such as Freeze Frame and Push Over.
** Car games in general: Listen to
the lowest-displayed price car's options. If "paint and fabric protection" is mentioned as an option, the correct item 75 percent car's final digit can be any number between 0 and 9. But if "paint and fabric protection" is not mentioned as an option, the last digit of the time.car is almost always 0 or 5.



** '''Eazy as 1-2-3''': Statistically, the winning combination is 2-1-3, with 3-1-2 next. Ergo, the least-expensive prize (by which the contestant would place the "1" block) is most often on the center platform.



** '''Gas Money''': Statistically, the correct answer is the least-expensive price (among five possibilities), followed by the second-least expensive choice. Eliminating the three most expensive items sequentially from the most expensive down will often make the game a 1-in-2 choice on the final pick.



** '''Let 'Em Roll''': Combinations are apt to be "higher-higher" and "lower-lower" rather than a mix.
** '''Magic #''': Picking a number around $2,250 will guarantee a win 95 percent of the time.
** '''Master Key''': Although all five keys are ostensibly placed randomly, the keys that unlock either the car or all three locks (the Master Key) are most often found in the middle three spots (slots 2-4).

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** '''Let 'Em Roll''': Combinations are apt to be "higher-higher" and "lower-lower" rather than a mix.
** '''Magic #''': Picking a number around $2,250 $3,000 will guarantee a win 95 percent of the time.
** '''Master Key''': Although all five keys are ostensibly placed randomly, *** In recent seasons, the keys game has become notorious for having ridiculously large ranges between the two prizes (the worst example being a June 2016 playing that unlock either the car or all three locks (the Master Key) are most often found in the middle three spots (slots 2-4).had a $3,000 TV and a $9,000 barbecue island).



** '''Push Over''': The first price shown is never correct, since it breaks the game's spirit (you don't have to "push over" any blocks).



** '''Rat Race''': The last prize is almost always $200-300 in price, meaning a blind guess of $200 – contestants are given a $100 leeway, high or low, on bids – will net at least one pick of a rat. For the two other items, $4 (for the grocery item, where the spread is $1) and $40 (for the small prize valued at less than $100, and $10 is allowed) are also safe bets. Playing the game this way should guarantee no fewer than two rats.

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** '''Rat Race''': The last prize is almost always $200-300 in price, meaning a blind guess of $200 – contestants are given a $100 leeway, high or low, on bids – will net at least one pick of a rat. For the two other items, $4 (for the grocery item, where the spread is $1) and $40 $70 (for the small prize valued at less than $100, and $10 is allowed) are also safe bets. Playing the game this way should guarantee no fewer than two rats.



** '''Squeeze Play''': Although the incorrect digit is ostensibly placed at random, a statistical analysis showed that it most often is the third digit that must be removed (from a five-digit string that, once the wrong number among three possibilities is removed, forms a four-digit price).



** '''Temptation''': The last digit of the car's price is always 0 or 5.



** '''That's Too Much!''': The correct answer is neither the first- nor 10th-given price. [[note]]For a short time during the 2008-2009 season, the right answer was almost always the second or ninth price, which skewed a Roger Dobkowitz-era rule that the correct answer almost always fell between slots 3 and 8 (and then, more often than not, was usually the fifth or sixth prices), eventually making contestants and fans complain … and then a couple of smart contestants foiled the prevailing "either second or ninth" setup.[[/note]]

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** '''That's Too Much!''': The correct answer is neither the first- nor 10th-given price. [[note]]For a short time
*** Since Season 39 (2010-2011), the correct answer has never been the second nor ninth price. This was because
during the 2008-2009 2009-2010 season, the right answer was almost always the second or ninth price, which skewed a Roger Dobkowitz-era rule that the correct answer almost always fell between slots 3 and 8 (and then, more often than not, was usually the fifth or sixth prices), eventually making contestants and fans complain … and then a couple of smart contestants foiled the prevailing "either second or ninth" setup.[[/note]]



*** Since Season 43 (2014-2015), all but one playing (in June 2015) has had the smaller prize end in -0.



** Some people blame the show for its abundance of short lineups in recent years. [[note]](example: 1 Right Price, Rat Race, Most Expen$ive, Grocery Game, Dice Game, Take Two)[[/note]] However, it's Creator/{{CBS}} that's to blame because of them demanding more commercial time for the show.

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** Some people blame the show for its abundance of short lineups in recent years. [[note]](example: 1 Right Price, Rat Race, Most Expen$ive, Grocery Lucky $even, Grand Game, Dice Game, Take Two)[[/note]] Push Over, Cover Up, Freeze Frame, Switch?)[[/note]] However, it's Creator/{{CBS}} that's to blame because of them demanding more commercial time for the show.
27th Jun '17 9:20:54 PM KoopaKid17
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** Fremantle also takes heat for a lot of the format changes that have happened under the Drew Carey era, such as set changes, couples shows, themed specials and celebrity episode. In actuality, CBS is the driving force behind all these. They even tried to push them when Bob Barker was still hosting, but since Barker was also executive producer at the time, he would not allow it.

to:

** Fremantle also takes heat for a lot of the format changes that have happened under the Drew Carey era, such as set changes, couples shows, themed specials and celebrity episode.players. In actuality, CBS is the driving force behind all these. They even tried to push them when Bob Barker was still hosting, but since Barker was also executive producer at the time, he would not allow it.
27th Jun '17 9:19:57 PM KoopaKid17
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Added DiffLines:

** Fremantle also takes heat for a lot of the format changes that have happened under the Drew Carey era, such as set changes, couples shows, themed specials and celebrity episode. In actuality, CBS is the driving force behind all these. They even tried to push them when Bob Barker was still hosting, but since Barker was also executive producer at the time, he would not allow it.
1st May '17 8:53:23 PM 8088ben
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** Pay the Rent, which offers a $100,000 grand prize for successfully finding a combination of six grocery items that will satisfy the conditions of the game (a single item, then a pair of items that cost more then the previous, than another pair of items that cost more than the last, and then the most expensive item). Unlike all other games, the "hidden rule" for one-solution playings (see below) is that contestants will ''not'' win by placing the groceries in order from least to most expensive. Despite this, a contestant placed the items correctly within two months of its debut, [[GavUpTooSoon but didn't realize this until he walked with $10,000]].

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** Pay the Rent, which offers a $100,000 grand prize for successfully finding a combination of six grocery items that will satisfy the conditions of the game (a single item, then a pair of items that cost more then the previous, than another pair of items that cost more than the last, and then the most expensive item). Unlike all other games, the "hidden rule" for one-solution playings (see below) is that contestants will ''not'' win by placing the groceries in order from least to most expensive. Despite this, a contestant placed the items correctly within two months of its debut, [[GavUpTooSoon [[GaveUpTooSoon but didn't realize this until he walked with $10,000]].
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