History YMMV / ThePriceIsRight

2nd May '16 9:21:01 PM squadallahthistle
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** The Ludia games are notorious for these with the most infamous being the Showcase Showdown [[TheComputerIsACheatingBastard almost always skewing in favor of the computer players]]. The pricing games for ''Decades'' are botched, such as Hurdles being a [[TheyJustDidntCare higher/lower game instead of "pick the grocery item with the lower price than the Hurdler's price"]].

to:

** The Ludia games are notorious for these with the most infamous being the Showcase Showdown [[TheComputerIsACheatingBastard almost always skewing in favor of the computer players]]. The pricing games for ''Decades'' are botched, such as Hurdles being a [[TheyJustDidntCare higher/lower game instead of "pick the grocery item with the lower price than the Hurdler's price"]]. That said, Ludia DID adapt the show more faithfully than a lot of their other game show video games.
2nd May '16 8:53:13 PM KoopaKid17
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* BrokenBase: Cover Up originally had contestants covering up a fake price. Since the end of Season 41, contestants cover up random symbols [[CouchGag which change with each playing]]. On one side, you have fans agreeing with Drew's point that covering up fake numbers to start the game is pointless and looking forward to seeing what symbols pop up. Then you have fans [[TheyChangedItNowItSucks complaining that they changed it for the sake of change]] and that covering up the fake price was an iconic part of the game.



* ToughActToFollow: Drew Carey succeeding Bob Barker with a caliber of 35 years as host.

to:

* ToughActToFollow: Drew Carey succeeding Bob Barker with a caliber of 35 years as host. To be fair, it would have been hard for ''anybody'' to hold a candle to Barker.
2nd May '16 8:22:36 PM KoopaKid17
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* TaintedByThePreview: As the Mike Richards era progressed, a staggering amount of promos have aired spoiling the results of pricing games and even the showcases. Fans express resentment for these as they further reduce the spontaneous nature of the show.
15th Apr '16 8:45:21 PM KoopaKid17
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

*** An increase in contestants who look like they've never even seen the show before; a practice that continues to this day. Never mind that the current version of the show has been on the air for almost ''half a century''.
11th Apr '16 7:37:48 PM KoopaKid17
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** The 1990 [=GameTek=] versions released to the PC and Commodore 64. All prizes are chosen at random, meaning car games are often played for other prizes other than cars. In Dice Game, numbers higher than six and zeroes can be in the price. Cliff Hangers gives a $300-window for bidding on prizes, including [[NintendoHard cars]]. An in-depth look at this game can be found [[http://mstiescott.tripod.com/tpirgame/tpir.html here]].
** The Ludia games are notorious for these, most commonly appearing in the Showcase Showdown which [[TheComputerIsACheatingBastard almost always skews in favor of the computer players]]. The pricing games for ''Decades'' were botched, such as Hurdles being a [[TheyJustDidntCare higher/lower game instead of "pick the grocery item with the lower price than the Hurdler's price"]].

to:

** The 1990 [=GameTek=] versions released to the PC and Commodore 64. All prizes are chosen at random, meaning car games are often played for other prizes other than cars. In Dice Game, numbers higher than six outside of the 1-6 range can and zeroes can will be in the price. Cliff Hangers gives a $300-window for bidding on prizes, including [[NintendoHard cars]]. An in-depth look at this game these games can be found [[http://mstiescott.tripod.com/tpirgame/tpir.html here]].
** The Ludia games are notorious for these, these with the most commonly appearing in infamous being the Showcase Showdown which [[TheComputerIsACheatingBastard almost always skews skewing in favor of the computer players]]. The pricing games for ''Decades'' were are botched, such as Hurdles being a [[TheyJustDidntCare higher/lower game instead of "pick the grocery item with the lower price than the Hurdler's price"]].
11th Apr '16 10:28:06 AM KoopaKid17
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* TheProblemWithLicensedGames:
** The 1990 [=GameTek=] versions released to the PC and Commodore 64. All prizes are chosen at random, meaning car games are often played for other prizes other than cars. In Dice Game, numbers higher than six and zeroes can be in the price. Cliff Hangers gives a $300-window for bidding on prizes, including [[NintendoHard cars]]. An in-depth look at this game can be found [[http://mstiescott.tripod.com/tpirgame/tpir.html here]].
** The Ludia games are notorious for these, most commonly appearing in the Showcase Showdown which [[TheComputerIsACheatingBastard almost always skews in favor of the computer players]]. The pricing games for ''Decades'' were botched, such as Hurdles being a [[TheyJustDidntCare higher/lower game instead of "pick the grocery item with the lower price than the Hurdler's price"]].
1st Mar '16 4:26:12 PM Gimere
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* CrowningMusicOfAwesome: After ''Series/TheMatchGameHollywoodSquaresHour'' ended in 1984, its theme tune moved over to become a car cue on ''Price''. The cue nearly always introduces a truly awesome car.

to:

* CrowningMusicOfAwesome: CrowningMusicOfAwesome:
**
After ''Series/TheMatchGameHollywoodSquaresHour'' ended in 1984, its theme tune tune, [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5gTMRkDZkuI "Lottery"]], moved over to become a car cue on ''Price''. The cue nearly always introduces a truly awesome car.



** Other longtime fans feel the show entered it in Season 37 when Roger Dobkowitz was ousted. The show then relied on a plethora of gimmicks (including a showcase with [[UndesirablePrize 365 pairs of shoes]]) and specials (such as a show to commemorate the 30th anniversary of Plinko with the game being played ''six times''). The difficulties of many pricing games [[NintendoHard skyrocketed]] while others vanished without a trace. Season 37 also brought in Drewcases, showcase sketches that were completely off the wall and had little or no relation to the prizes. This was also the time when fan-favorite Rich Fields was ousted and when Pay the Rent was introduced, a least favorite pricing game among many fans. Some fans argue that the show has started coming out of it in Season 43 which saw some specials and gimmicks (or al least the unnecessary ones) dying down with the show feeling a lot more professional.

to:

** Other longtime fans feel the show entered it in Season 37 when Roger Dobkowitz was ousted. The show then relied on a plethora of gimmicks (including a showcase with [[UndesirablePrize 365 pairs of shoes]]) and specials (such as a show to commemorate the 30th anniversary of Plinko with the game being played ''six times''). The difficulties of many pricing games [[NintendoHard skyrocketed]] while others vanished without a trace. Season 37 also brought in Drewcases, showcase sketches that were completely off the wall and had little or no relation to the prizes. This was also the time when fan-favorite Rich Fields was ousted and when Pay the Rent was introduced, a least favorite pricing game among many fans. Some fans argue that the show has started coming out of it in Season 43 which saw some specials and gimmicks (or al at least the unnecessary ones) dying down with the show feeling a lot more professional.
28th Feb '16 9:50:52 AM Lirodon
Is there an issue? Send a Message


*** The show pretty obviously suffered from a severe case of NoBudget the pricing games not only looked cheap and never bothered to have their names on the props (Cliffhangers being a particularly good example), but almost all of the prize budget was put into the Showcase, including any cars at all. Sure, this had been the case on prior versions, but at least on those the pricing games offered substantial prizes. Cash was '''never''' offered during the show's run; the aforementioned Big W shopping sprees were worth $3,000, and all other pricing game prizes were less than $2,000 in value.

to:

*** The show pretty obviously suffered from a severe case of NoBudget the pricing games not only looked cheap and never bothered to have their names on the props (Cliffhangers being a particularly good example), but almost all of the prize budget was put into the Showcase, including any cars at all. Sure, this had been the case on prior versions, but at least on those the pricing games offered substantial prizes.prizes, as well as the legendary, $500,000+ "Mega Showcase". Cash was '''never''' offered during the show's run; the aforementioned Big W shopping sprees were worth $3,000, and all other pricing game prizes were less than $2,000 in value.
28th Feb '16 9:48:41 AM Lirodon
Is there an issue? Send a Message


*** The show pretty obviously suffered from a severe case of NoBudget the pricing games not only looked cheap and never bothered to have their names on the props (Cliffhangers being a particularly good example), but almost all of the prize budget was put into the Showcase...including any cars at all. Sure, this had been the case on prior versions, but at least on those the pricing games offered substantial prizes!
*** The majority of the proceedings were a ProductPromotionParade for the department store chain Big W. Every grocery item or prize was promoted as being "provided" by Big W, and Plinko and Wonderwall (aka Punch-A-Bunch), both normally played for cash, were instead played for Big W "shopping sprees" (read: store credit). Cash was '''never''' offered during the show's run.

to:

*** The majority of the proceedings were a gigantic advertisement for the department store chain Big W. Every grocery item or prize was promoted as being "[[EnforcedPlug provided]]" by Big W, and Plinko and Wonderwall (aka Punch-A-Bunch), both normally played for cash, were instead played for Big W "shopping sprees" (read: store credit).
*** The show pretty obviously suffered from a severe case of NoBudget the pricing games not only looked cheap and never bothered to have their names on the props (Cliffhangers being a particularly good example), but almost all of the prize budget was put into the Showcase...Showcase, including any cars at all. Sure, this had been the case on prior versions, but at least on those the pricing games offered substantial prizes!
*** The majority of the proceedings were a ProductPromotionParade for the department store chain Big W. Every grocery item or prize was promoted as being "provided" by Big W, and Plinko and Wonderwall (aka Punch-A-Bunch), both normally played for cash, were instead played for Big W "shopping sprees" (read: store credit).
prizes. Cash was '''never''' offered during the show's run.run; the aforementioned Big W shopping sprees were worth $3,000, and all other pricing game prizes were less than $2,000 in value.
18th Feb '16 11:54:19 AM themisterfree
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

** Despite the flaws of the 1994 nighttime version, it did have a pretty [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jIhOP2NR2bM cool remix of the daytime theme]].
This list shows the last 10 events of 222. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=YMMV.ThePriceIsRight