History YMMV / TheNightGwenStacyDied

12th Jul '17 4:33:43 PM JulianLapostat
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* SignatureScene: The comic has three well known panels:
** The first is of course the bridge scene leading to Gwen falling down and Spider-Man trying to catch her by his webs.
** The second is Green Goblin's death scene, being impaled by his own glider, recreated in the ''Film/SpiderManTrilogy''.
** The third one is the final panels with MJ and Peter, with MJ staying by Peter's side even after he lashes at her out of grief.
10th Jul '17 10:03:22 AM Ferot_Dreadnaught
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* UnbuiltTrope: This is the one comic that started the entire [[StuffedIntoTheFridge Woman In Refrigerators]] trend, predating the TropeNamer by a good two decades. The motivations for it behind-the-scenes were identical to the general trope, using the girl's death to add to the hero's {{Angst}} and provide him something to feel badly about.
** At that time, where superhero comics were generally seen to lack consequences, a WhamEpisode where the hero outright fails was quite new and unexpected and seen as a daring RealityEnsues. Unlike later examples such as Jason Todd or Sue Dibny, the story was promoted and presented as "just another Spider-Man adventure" and the finale felt like a SurprisinglySuddenDeath to most readers. A one-time effect that is impossible to repeat or appreciate in retrospect especially after the dark age of comics.
** Unlike other examples, Gwen's death had deep, meaningful consequences to Spider-Man's character and mythos, and Conway and later writers treated the death as Spider-Man's ShockingDefeatLegacy, inspiring him to be a better and more heroic character and elevating Gwen to respectfully become TheLostLenore even as MJ became his SecondLove. The trope it inspired is ILetGwenStacyDie and not "''Dropped From A Bridge''" for a reason.
10th Jul '17 10:00:25 AM MorgenReiter
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* SeinfeldIsUnfunny: This is the one comic that started the entire [[StuffedIntoTheFridge Woman In Refrigerators]] trend, predating the TropeNamer by a good two decades. The motivations for it behind-the-scenes were identical to the general trope, using the girl's death to add to the hero's {{Angst}} and provide him something to feel badly about.
** At that time, where superhero comics were generally seen to lack consequences, a WhamEpisode where the hero outright fails was quite new and unexpected and seen as a daring RealityEnsues. Unlike later examples such as Jason Todd or Sue Dibny, the story was promoted and presented as "just another Spider-Man adventure" and the finale felt like a SurprisinglySuddenDeath to most readers. A one-time effect that is impossible to repeat or appreciate in retrospect especially after the dark age of comics.
** Unlike other examples, Gwen's death had deep, meaningful consequences to Spider-Man's character and mythos, and Conway and later writers treated the death as Spider-Man's ShockingDefeatLegacy, inspiring him to be a better and more heroic character and elevating Gwen to respectfully become TheLostLenore even as MJ became his SecondLove. The trope it inspired is ILetGwenStacyDie and not "''Dropped From A Bridge''" for a reason.


Added DiffLines:

* UnbuiltTrope: This is the one comic that started the entire [[StuffedIntoTheFridge Woman In Refrigerators]] trend, predating the TropeNamer by a good two decades. The motivations for it behind-the-scenes were identical to the general trope, using the girl's death to add to the hero's {{Angst}} and provide him something to feel badly about.
** At that time, where superhero comics were generally seen to lack consequences, a WhamEpisode where the hero outright fails was quite new and unexpected and seen as a daring RealityEnsues. Unlike later examples such as Jason Todd or Sue Dibny, the story was promoted and presented as "just another Spider-Man adventure" and the finale felt like a SurprisinglySuddenDeath to most readers. A one-time effect that is impossible to repeat or appreciate in retrospect especially after the dark age of comics.
** Unlike other examples, Gwen's death had deep, meaningful consequences to Spider-Man's character and mythos, and Conway and later writers treated the death as Spider-Man's ShockingDefeatLegacy, inspiring him to be a better and more heroic character and elevating Gwen to respectfully become TheLostLenore even as MJ became his SecondLove. The trope it inspired is ILetGwenStacyDie and not "''Dropped From A Bridge''" for a reason.
4th Jul '17 11:18:15 PM JulianLapostat
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* HypeBacklash: On account of its status as "the best Spider-Man" story and so on. Recent fans have deprecated the story, seeing it less as a daring RealityEnsues moment, than the first of Marvel's WriterOnBoard attempts to keep Peter from maturing and growing up. They also note that read in context, the plot comes across as sped up and artificial[[note]]Norman Osborn after being dormant in amnesia just suddenly snaps and the plot itself has no build-up and tension and just proceeds from there[[/note]] and the art-work aside from some famous panels is not as great as Spider-Man at his best. Especially with the popularity of ''Spider-Gwen'' and the popularity of Creator/EmmaStone's performance in ''Film/TheAmazingSpiderManSeries''[[note]]To the point that her death in the film was poorly recieved and the film itself was highly unpopular[[/note]] there have been calls to resurrect Gwen Stacy for good.
26th Jun '17 10:51:05 AM Clown-Face
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* CompleteMonster: The Green Goblin established himself as a completely monstrous individual with this story. As if killing poor Gwen wasn't enough, the Goblin completely mocks the value of her life. The point is driven home when the Goblin gets completely pissed after Spidey (supposedly) destroys his glider, and starts to cry even harder for revenge. Spidey calls him out for acting in such an entitled way when ''[[MoralMyopia he just killed his girlfriend]]''. The Goblin then [[DiggingYourselfDeeper says the little chestnut]] of calling Gwen "a simpering, pointless girl who never did more than occupy space". Cue [[UnstoppableRage Spider-Man beating the crap out of him]].
18th Mar '17 9:38:16 PM JulianLapostat
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* NeverLiveItDown: Some fans define the character of Norman Osborn by the crime he committed in this story, and less-informed fans define Gwen Stacy by this moment/her characterization during this moment. She's almost always remembered as the GirlNextDoor type characterization that she had [[CharacterizationMarchesOn at the time]], and remembered as the 'one who died'. At least in Gwen's case, ''ComicBook/SpiderGwen'' has helped define her character differently to a new generation of readers.

to:

* NeverLiveItDown: NeverLiveItDown:
**
Some fans define the character of Norman Osborn by the crime he committed in this story, and less-informed fans define Gwen Stacy by this moment/her characterization during this moment. She's almost always remembered as the GirlNextDoor type characterization that she had [[CharacterizationMarchesOn at the time]], and remembered as the 'one who died'. At least in Gwen's case, ''ComicBook/SpiderGwen'' has helped define her character differently to a new generation of readers.readers.
** For a long time, this became one for Peter, cementing his FailureHero status. In ''ComicBook/CivilWar'', Iron Man even refers to this instance as something that could have been avoided had Peter been registered and given training when he was young and inexperienced, while Alex Ross' ''Marvels'' elevates Spider-Man's failure to save Gwen as the ultimate EndOfAnAge.
18th Mar '17 9:35:14 PM JulianLapostat
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* SeinfeldIsUnfunny: This is the one comic that started the entire [[StuffedIntoTheFridge Woman In Refrigerators]] trend, predating the TropeNamer by a good two decades. Although most people agree that it's not an actual proto-example of it, since Gwen's death have deep, meaningful consequences to Spider-Man's character and mythos, even to this day. Conway didn't use the death only for shock value, but used it as the foundation of his entire run, exploring the effects this death has on Peter and his inner circle. The infamous trope is not named "''Dropped From A Bridge''" for a reason. Still, the "death of a significant other" has been done so many times in superhero stories since it first came out that it doesn't have nearly the same impact on modern readers.

to:

* SeinfeldIsUnfunny: This is the one comic that started the entire [[StuffedIntoTheFridge Woman In Refrigerators]] trend, predating the TropeNamer by a good two decades. Although The motivations for it behind-the-scenes were identical to the general trope, using the girl's death to add to the hero's {{Angst}} and provide him something to feel badly about.
** At that time, where superhero comics were generally seen to lack consequences, a WhamEpisode where the hero outright fails was quite new and unexpected and seen as a daring RealityEnsues. Unlike later examples such as Jason Todd or Sue Dibny, the story was promoted and presented as "just another Spider-Man adventure" and the finale felt like a SurprisinglySuddenDeath to
most people agree readers. A one-time effect that it's not an actual proto-example is impossible to repeat or appreciate in retrospect especially after the dark age of it, since comics.
** Unlike other examples,
Gwen's death have had deep, meaningful consequences to Spider-Man's character and mythos, even to this day. and Conway didn't use and later writers treated the death only for shock value, but used it as the foundation of Spider-Man's ShockingDefeatLegacy, inspiring him to be a better and more heroic character and elevating Gwen to respectfully become TheLostLenore even as MJ became his entire run, exploring the effects this death has on Peter and his inner circle. SecondLove. The infamous trope it inspired is ILetGwenStacyDie and not named "''Dropped From A Bridge''" for a reason. Still, the "death of a significant other" has been done so many times in superhero stories since it first came out that it doesn't have nearly the same impact on modern readers.
18th Mar '17 9:18:37 PM JulianLapostat
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** Many say that the original impetus for the story was a way for writer Gerry Conway to resolve the Gwen Stacy romance since she had become too close to Peter and realistically, as an OfficialCouple, they would eventually marry and settle down which aged up the character considerably. Conway also saw Gwen as uninteresting compared to Mary-Jane and he stated later [[http://www.comicbookresources.com/?page=article&id=47030 that the only reason people remember Gwen was because of her death]]. Conway was a decent writer and the storyline worked out pretty well, becoming a stunning WhamEpisode that changed the course of the series. However, by replacing Gwen with Mary Jane, the same problem of Peter being part of an OfficialCouple resurfaced only now the excuse of the LoveInterest being boring couldn't fly, since Mary Jane had PopularityPower, so eventually Peter did get married after all, [[http://www.geekcrusade.com/news/gerry-conway-interview/9923 a decision which Conway said]] was a mistake.
** Another complaint is that writers now couldn't kill off any more of Peter's girlfriends because it would make Peter too much of a FailureHero. Conway's idea of killing Gwen was merely a [[ItOnlyWorksOnce one-time solution]] to the problem of whether or not Peter should age.[[note]]However, writers later on killed off at least one would-be love-interest ("The Death of Jean [=DeWolff=]") and tried to sell readers on the idea that Mary Jane had actually been killed in an aircraft accident.[[/note]]So later writers tried to find another way to get out of this problem, leading to controversial retcons like the one in ''ComicBook/TheCloneSaga'' and universally reviled storylines like ''ComicBook/OneMoreDay'', both being extreme ideas to keep Spider-Man from aging and freeing him from being part of an OfficialCouple. In some tortuous way this is supposed to have planted the seeds of Spider-Man's DorkAge problems.

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** Many say that the The original impetus for the story was a way for story, at least according to writer Gerry Conway Conway, was to resolve the Gwen Stacy romance since she had become too close to Peter and realistically, as an OfficialCouple, they would eventually marry and settle down which aged up the character considerably.considerably. There didn't seem a believable way to break up the couple, and free Peter up to romance with Mary-Jane without making either or both of them JerkAss. Conway also saw Gwen as uninteresting compared to Mary-Jane and he stated later [[http://www.comicbookresources.com/?page=article&id=47030 that the only reason people remember Gwen was because of her death]]. Conway was a decent writer and the storyline worked out pretty well, well in the short-term, becoming a stunning WhamEpisode that changed the course of the series. WhamEpisode. However, by replacing Gwen with Mary Jane, [[DidntThinkThisThrough the same problem of Peter being part part]] of an OfficialCouple resurfaced only now the excuse of the LoveInterest being boring couldn't fly, since Mary Jane had PopularityPower, so eventually Peter did get married after all, [[http://www.geekcrusade.com/news/gerry-conway-interview/9923 a decision which Conway said]] was a mistake.
** Another complaint is that Likewise, by having Peter fail to save his LoveInterest, the writers now set up such a ShockingDefeatLegacy for Peter that they couldn't kill off any more of Peter's girlfriends because add on to it would make Peter without making him too much of a FailureHero. Conway's idea of killing Gwen was merely a [[ItOnlyWorksOnce one-time solution]] to the problem of whether or not Peter should age.[[note]]However, Later writers later on killed off tried to mimic it, with the death of at least one would-be love-interest ("The Death of Jean [=DeWolff=]") whose connection to Peter and circumstances of her actual death added to SurvivorsGuilt for Peter but not the same sense of failure. Likewise, after Peter and MJ got married, they tried to sell readers on the idea spin a story that Mary Jane had actually been killed in an aircraft accident.[[/note]]So later accident, albeit in a NeverFoundTheBody manner that added to Peter's frustration ''and'' his failure, making him such a sad-sack that it made his books cross into DarknessInducedAudienceApathy.
** In general, the ''Gwen Stacy'' story is more or less part of the long-term of issue of whether Spider-Man should grow up past ComicBookTime or remain young and hip and relatable. Later
writers tried in grappling with the problem and also trying to find another way to get out keep Spider-Man single unleashed the true DorkAge of this problem, Spider-Man leading to controversial retcons like the one in ''ComicBook/TheCloneSaga'' and universally reviled storylines like ''ComicBook/OneMoreDay'', both being extreme ideas to keep Spider-Man from aging and freeing him from being part of an OfficialCouple. In some tortuous way this is supposed to have planted the seeds of Spider-Man's DorkAge problems. OfficialCouple.
14th Jan '17 8:56:40 PM KingClark
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* AlternateCharacterInterpretation: Not so much the characters as the writers. Gerry Conway has been accused by many as killing her off because he preferred Mary Jane, but the official story is that they wanted a shocking death, and Gwen was the only one who would be shocking enough. So for many fans, it's down to two interpretations: A case of DieForOurShip, or a case of StuffedIntoTheFridge. Gerry Conway himself is [[http://comicbook.com/blog/2012/10/03/gerry-conway-blasts-gwen-stacy-criticizes-stan-lee-in-new-book-on-marvel/pretty unambiguous]]:

to:

* AlternateCharacterInterpretation: Not so much the characters as the writers. Gerry Conway has been accused by many as killing her off because he preferred Mary Jane, but the official story is that they wanted a shocking death, and Gwen was the only one who would be shocking enough. So for many fans, it's down to two interpretations: A a case of DieForOurShip, or a case of StuffedIntoTheFridge. Gerry Conway himself is [[http://comicbook.com/blog/2012/10/03/gerry-conway-blasts-gwen-stacy-criticizes-stan-lee-in-new-book-on-marvel/pretty unambiguous]]:
14th Jan '17 8:55:37 PM KingClark
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* AlternateCharacterInterpretation: Not so much the characters as the writers. Gerry Conway has been accused by many as killing her off because he preferred Mary Jane, but the official story is that they wanted a shocking death, and Gwen was the only one who would be shocking enough. So for many fans, it's down to two interpretations: A case of DieForOurShip, or a case of StuffedIntoTheFridge. Gerry Conway himself is [[http://comicbook.com/blog/2012/10/03/gerry-conway-blasts-gwen-stacy-criticizes-stan-lee-in-new-book-on-marvel/pretty unambiguous]]

to:

* AlternateCharacterInterpretation: Not so much the characters as the writers. Gerry Conway has been accused by many as killing her off because he preferred Mary Jane, but the official story is that they wanted a shocking death, and Gwen was the only one who would be shocking enough. So for many fans, it's down to two interpretations: A case of DieForOurShip, or a case of StuffedIntoTheFridge. Gerry Conway himself is [[http://comicbook.com/blog/2012/10/03/gerry-conway-blasts-gwen-stacy-criticizes-stan-lee-in-new-book-on-marvel/pretty unambiguous]]unambiguous]]:



* ItWasHisSled: This trope is clearly UpToEleven considering the [[SpoilerTitle spoiler is in the title itself]]. However, the title itself isn't shown until the end of the issue in which she dies.

to:

* ItWasHisSled: This trope is clearly UpToEleven considering the [[SpoilerTitle spoiler is in the title itself]]. However, the title itself isn't shown until the end of the issue in which she dies.dies... But good luck trying to read this story without hearing about the title from a trade paperback it's sold in.



* LoveItOrHateIt: The story's reception in its own time. The fans flooded Marvel with letters, some praising the creators for taking such a bold move, others calling them murderers. Nowadays, it's highly regarded.

to:

* LoveItOrHateIt: The story's reception in its own time.[[PopularityPolynomial at the time it was made]]. The fans flooded Marvel with letters, some praising the creators for taking such a bold move, others calling them murderers. Nowadays, it's highly regarded.



* NeverLiveItDown: Some fans define the character of Norman Osborn by the crime he committed in this story, and less-informed fans define Gwen Stacy by this moment/her characterization during this moment. She's almost always remembered as the GirlNextDoor type characterization that she had [[CharacterizationMarchesOn at the time]], and remembered as the 'one who died'.

to:

* NeverLiveItDown: Some fans define the character of Norman Osborn by the crime he committed in this story, and less-informed fans define Gwen Stacy by this moment/her characterization during this moment. She's almost always remembered as the GirlNextDoor type characterization that she had [[CharacterizationMarchesOn at the time]], and remembered as the 'one who died'. At least in Gwen's case, ''ComicBook/SpiderGwen'' has helped define her character differently to a new generation of readers.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=YMMV.TheNightGwenStacyDied