5 Hours Left to Support a Troper-Created Project : Personal Space (discuss)

History YMMV / StarTrekTheNextGeneration

7th May '16 8:04:59 AM WiddershinsDaughter
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** Creator/WilWheaton is a rather impressive example of a meta-woobie. A child actor at the time whose career had for the most part been carefully shepherded through some excellently chosen roles (most notably Gordie in ''Film/StandByMe''), Wesley Crusher was chosen to be a role to cap out his childhood career and launch him as an adult actor. Instead, he found himself written into some of the worst scripts in the show, made into a walking example of everything wrong with TV at the time, and subjected to unconscionable abuse for writing decisions that were in no way his fault. No wonder he dropped out of acting entirely for a number of years after leaving the show.
7th May '16 7:31:41 AM WiddershinsDaughter
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* UnintentionalPeriodPiece: Though seasons 3 onward strove for a more timeless aesthetic, the first two seasons were filmed at the height of the 80s and hoo boy, do they look it.
6th May '16 7:07:41 AM aye_amber
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** An echo to the series as a whole as well, as StarTrekDeepSpaceNine was written and developed after Gene's passing, and depicted the Federation in a much more pessimistic light.

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** An echo to the series as a whole as well, as StarTrekDeepSpaceNine Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine was written and developed after Gene's passing, and depicted the Federation in a much more pessimistic light.
3rd May '16 10:54:17 PM Antwan
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** For a more obvious example, the episode "Conspiracy" has a very laughable puppet that bursts out of [[spoiler:Dexter Remmick's]] chest. The fact that it was blue screened atrociously into the scene makes the effect even more laughable than it already was.

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** For a more obvious example, the episode "Conspiracy" [[https://youtu.be/g_Vr9LnogLM?t=1m26s "Conspiracy"]] has a very laughable puppet that bursts out of [[spoiler:Dexter Remmick's]] chest. The fact that it was blue screened atrociously into the scene makes the effect even more laughable than it already was.
3rd May '16 7:06:21 AM Antwan
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** The episode "The Hunted" is an allegory about neglected war veterans (specifically veterans of UsefulNotes/TheVietnamWar, but really applicable to the veterans of any war), and in true StarTrek fashion, it is ''not'' subtle about making its point.
** Some viewers were put off by Picard's angry speech in "Who Watches the Watchers", which appeared to be suggesting that a mere belief in a higher power amounted to superstition, ignorance and fear. This was probably a case of MisBlamed, because was specifically talking about the cast-off religion of the Mintakans, whose believe in the "Overseer" did in fact lead to those very things. Some fans take issue with the episode since aspects of Picard's speech still sound as if they're applicable to religion in general.
-->"Horrifying... Dr. Barron, your report describes how rational these people are. Millennia ago, they abandoned their belief in the supernatural. Now you are asking me to sabotage that achievement, to send them back into the dark ages of superstition and ignorance and fear? No!"

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** The episode "The Hunted" is an allegory about neglected war veterans (specifically veterans of UsefulNotes/TheVietnamWar, but really applicable to the veterans of any war), and in true StarTrek Franchise/StarTrek fashion, it is ''not'' subtle about making its point.
** Some viewers were put off by Picard's angry speech in "Who Watches the Watchers", which appeared to be suggesting that a mere belief in a higher power amounted to superstition, ignorance and fear. This was probably a case of MisBlamed, because he was specifically talking about the cast-off religion of the Mintakans, whose believe in the "Overseer" did in fact lead to those very things. Some fans take issue with the episode since aspects of Picard's speech still sound as if they're applicable to religion in general.
-->"Horrifying...-->''"Horrifying... Dr. Barron, your report describes how rational these people are. Millennia ago, they abandoned their belief in the supernatural. Now you are asking me to sabotage that achievement, to send them back into the dark ages of superstition and ignorance and fear? No!"No!"''



-->"In a world where children blow up children, everyone's a threat."
* AssPull: The ending to "Sins of the Father". The whole episode practically sledgehammered the premise that Worf's actions could only end in success or his death. [[spoiler:Then at the very last minute Worf matter-of-factly brings up a third way that everyone can live with.]] There is ''a'' justification for this (Worf only brings it up once he is trying to survive rather than achieve his initial goal), but it can still feel jarring.

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-->"In -->''"In a world where children blow up children, everyone's a threat."
"''
* AssPull: The ending to "Sins of the Father". The whole episode practically sledgehammered the premise that Worf's actions could only end in success or his death. [[spoiler:Then at the very last minute minute, Worf matter-of-factly brings up a third way that everyone can live with.]] There is ''a'' justification for this (Worf only brings it up once he is trying to survive rather than achieve his initial goal), but it can still feel jarring.



** GeneRoddenberry never liked that he used the Klingons as the "Race of Black Hats" in [[Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries The Original Series]], and thus made Worf as a Klingon main character and the first season episode "Heart of Glory" completely redefined their place as a [[ProudWarriorRaceGuy Proud Warrior Race]].

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** GeneRoddenberry Creator/GeneRoddenberry never liked that he used the Klingons as the "Race of Black Hats" in [[Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries The Original Series]], and thus made Worf as a Klingon main character and the first season episode "Heart of Glory" completely redefined their place as a [[ProudWarriorRaceGuy Proud Warrior Race]].



* CommonKnowledge:
** Probably one of the most "common" bits of common knowledge surrounding this series is that Wesley Crusher was the character to always solve the problem, save the ship, etc., and that he was excessively praised by the other characters. The truth is, while Wesley has earned much of his [[TheScrappy scrappy]] reputation, the extent of his "saving the ship" has been greatly exaggerated, including on this very wiki. He actually was only the one to solve the problem of the week six times, which is still probably more times than he should have, but hardly "every other week", as he has been accused. He also had his fair share of episodes where he screwed things up, or was called out by other characters.
** It's less common these days, but often fans will refer to this series as being truly great from the beginning, especially if the person making this claim is trying to compare it to series that followed. Most fans these days, thanks to online nostalgic reviews of the series, can now admit that the first season was chock full of {{Narm}}, [[LargeHam bad acting]], EarlyInstallmentWeirdness, SpecialEffectsFailure and other, [[UnfortunateImplications worse things]].



* CommonKnowledge:
** Probably one of the most "common" bits of common knowledge surrounding this series is that Wesley Crusher was the character to always solve the problem, save the ship, etc., and that he was excessively praised by the other characters. The truth is, while Wesley has earned much of his [[TheScrappy scrappy]] reputation, the extent of his "saving the ship" has been greatly exaggerated, including on this very wiki. He actually was only the one to solve the problem of the week six times, which is still probably more times than he should have, but hardly "every other week", as he has been accused. He also had his fair share of episodes where he screwed things up, or was called out by other characters.
** It's less common these days, but often fans will refer to this series as being truly great from the beginning, especially if the person making this claim is trying to compare it to series that followed. Most fans these days, thanks to online nostalgic reviews of the series, can now admit that the first season was chock full of {{Narm}}, [[LargeHam bad acting]], EarlyInstallmentWeirdness, SpecialEffectsFailure and other, [[UnfortunateImplications worse things]].



** [[{{Warehouse13}} Saul Rubinek]] as a villainous CollectorOfTheStrange in "The Most Toys".
** In "Deja Q", after being rendered mortal, during his check-up with Dr Crusher, Q [[DeadpanSnarker snarks]] that he's "been under a lot of pressure, family problems". Ironically, Q would later start a family during his appearances on ''Voyager'', where his son proved to be as much trouble as he was!
*** Doubles as HarsherInHindsight for fans of ''[[Series/BreakingBad Breaking Bad]]'', where John de Lancie plays an air traffic controller [[spoiler:whose daughter dies of a drug overdose, causing him to become distracted and inattentive when he returns to work too soon, leading to a midair collision that kills hundreds.]]

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** [[{{Warehouse13}} [[Series/{{Warehouse 13}} Saul Rubinek]] as a villainous CollectorOfTheStrange in "The Most Toys".
** In "Deja Q", after being rendered mortal, during his check-up with Dr Dr. Crusher, Q [[DeadpanSnarker snarks]] that he's "been under a lot of pressure, family problems". Ironically, Q would later start a family during his appearances on ''Voyager'', where his son proved to be as much trouble as he was!
*** Doubles as HarsherInHindsight for fans of ''[[Series/BreakingBad Breaking Bad]]'', ''Series/BreakingBad'', where John de Lancie plays an air traffic controller [[spoiler:whose daughter dies of a drug overdose, causing him to become distracted and inattentive when he returns to work too soon, leading to a midair collision that kills hundreds.]]



** The adult Wil Wheaton looks absolutely nothing like the actor playing adult Wesley in "Hide and Q." They didn't even get the hair or eye color right.

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** The adult Wil Wheaton looks absolutely nothing like the actor playing adult Wesley in "Hide and Q." Q". They didn't even get the hair or eye color right.



%%* IronWoobie: Captain Picard.

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%%* * IronWoobie: Captain Picard.Picard. "Chain of Command" alone shows how much he can suffer through and still come out strong.



** Due to both characters being played by JohnDeLancie (And one being directly based on the other), there is a running gag on the internet involving Q and [[MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagic Discord]] being the same person. "Q got bored and decided to troll ponies!" It helps that Picard once described Q as "next-of-kin to chaos." Now he really ''is'' the embodiment of chaos.

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** Due to both characters being played by JohnDeLancie Creator/JohnDeLancie (And one being directly based on the other), there is a running gag on the internet involving Q and [[MyLittlePonyFriendshipIsMagic Discord]] being the same person. "Q got bored and decided to troll ponies!" It helps that Picard once described Q as "next-of-kin to chaos." Now he really ''is'' the embodiment of chaos.



* OneSceneWonder: Sarek in "Unification I"..

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* OneSceneWonder: Sarek in "Unification I"..I".



** Wesley, once he got older and enrolled in Starfleet Academy.
** Wesley is much, much less annoying if you simply skip the first season. He still has his whiny moments in the second, but he grows up pretty quickly, and by the third season, he's actually pretty bearable. Wil Wheaton's having become such a popular nerd icon who never misses a chance to assure us he ''also'' hated Wesley really helps too.

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** Wesley, once he got older and enrolled in Starfleet Academy.
** Wesley is much,
Academy. In fact, some find him much less annoying if you they simply skip the first season. He still has his whiny moments in the second, but he grows up pretty quickly, and by the third season, he's actually pretty bearable. Wil Wheaton's having become such a popular nerd icon who never misses a chance to assure us he ''also'' hated Wesley really helps too.



** "Symbiosis": Drugs're bad, mmmkay?

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** "Symbiosis": [[WesternAnimation/SouthPark Drugs're bad, mmmkay?mmmkay?]]



** An android being played by an actor who ''ages''[[SarcasmMode ? What were they thinking?!]] ''Star Trek'' was big in season one; but it wasn't the world-spanning multi-billion dollar Goliath it is now. Casting Data with an actor who ages as an immortal android is pretty easily explained by the fact the producers had no reasonable way of knowing just how long-running the series would eventually become.

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** An android being played by an actor who ''ages''[[SarcasmMode ? ''ages''? [[SarcasmMode What were they thinking?!]] ''Star Trek'' was big in season one; but it wasn't the world-spanning multi-billion dollar Goliath it is now. Casting Data with an actor who ages as an immortal android is pretty easily explained by the fact the producers had no reasonable way of knowing just how long-running the series would eventually become.



* StrangledByTheRedString: In S7 Ep 11, "Parallels" Worf is sent multiverse-hopping, and he briefly winds up in a world where he and Troi are very HappilyMarried. While he had never considered this before he decided to give it a try when he got back. This was the starting point of the writers developing a bizarre obsession with hooking them up despite the two never having any kind of romantic chemistry before. There had been a bit of foreshadowing in the previous year's "Fistful of Datas", and Troi had served as a mother figure to Worf's son, Alexander, as well as Troi's long standing WillTheyOrWontThey with Riker. In what's probably a an AuthorsSavingThrow, none of the TNG films have any mention of the relationship, despite the Series' finale including a possible future where Worf and Riker are at odds over Troi even after her death.

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* StrangledByTheRedString: In S7 Ep 11, "Parallels" "Parallels", Worf is sent multiverse-hopping, and he briefly winds up in a world where he and Troi are very HappilyMarried. While he had never considered this before he decided to give it a try when he got back. This was the starting point of the writers developing a bizarre obsession with hooking them up despite the two never having any kind of romantic chemistry before. There had been a bit of foreshadowing in the previous year's "Fistful of Datas", and Troi had served as a mother figure to Worf's son, Alexander, as well as Troi's long standing WillTheyOrWontThey with Riker. In what's probably a an AuthorsSavingThrow, none of the TNG films have any mention of the relationship, despite the Series' finale including a possible future where Worf and Riker are at odds over Troi even after her death.



** Back when the Federation forcibly relocating a people was considered a ''bad'' thing, Picard had to relocate some people descended from American Indians from a planet that was about to become Cardassian territory. The problem for the aesop was that the Federation really was doing this for the colonists' own protection and was not some thinly-veiled excuse, as the episode tried to imply by historical comparison, but because the Cardassians were brutal to the inhabitants of planets they occupy. The Federation citizens in question opted to join the Cardassians so they wouldn't have to relocate, but had acknowledged the dangers involved.

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** Back when the Federation forcibly relocating a people was considered a ''bad'' thing, Picard had to relocate some people descended from American Indians from a planet that was about to become Cardassian territory. The problem for the aesop was that the Federation really was doing this for the colonists' own protection and was not some thinly-veiled excuse, as the episode tried to imply by historical comparison, but because the Cardassians were brutal to the inhabitants of planets they occupy. The Federation citizens in question opted to join the Cardassians so they wouldn't have to relocate, but had acknowledged the dangers involved.



* UnderminedByReality: Even worse than the original series. The series follows Gene Roddenberry's vision of the future: Earth has embraced enlightened beliefs and has "outgrown" things like greed, grief, conflict and the need for money and things like contemporary 1980s culture was seen as barbaric at best. This is at odds with Gene's rather shady business ethics and the show's writers participated in a writer's strike for an increase in pay, However, it should be said that most of the writers didn't share Gene's vision, often frustrated that their scripts were often rejected or changed for the worse and they began abandoning his vision as Gene involvement in the series decreased.

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* UnderminedByReality: Even worse than the original series. The series follows Gene Roddenberry's vision of the future: Earth has embraced enlightened beliefs and has "outgrown" things like greed, grief, conflict and the need for money and things like contemporary 1980s culture was seen as barbaric at best. This is at odds with Gene's rather shady business ethics and the show's writers participated in a writer's strike for an increase in pay, However, it should be said that most of the writers didn't share Gene's vision, often frustrated that their scripts were often rejected or changed for the worse and they began abandoning his vision as Gene Gene's involvement in the series decreased.



** Many civilian outfits, such as [[http://tng.trekcore.com/hd/albums/3x13/deja_q_hd_045.jpg Q's civilian outfit]] in "Deja Q". It's really no wonder Picard {{Face Palm}}ed, and that the first thing Q does after getting back his powers is changing his clothes. (There is [[http://www.sttngfashion.tumblr.com at least one blog]] dedicated to celebrating these sartorial choices.)

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** Many civilian outfits, such as [[http://tng.trekcore.com/hd/albums/3x13/deja_q_hd_045.jpg Q's civilian outfit]] in "Deja Q". It's really no wonder Picard {{Face Palm}}ed, and that the first thing Q does after getting back his powers is changing his clothes. (There is [[http://www.sttngfashion.[[http://sttngfashion.tumblr.com at least one blog]] dedicated to celebrating these sartorial choices.)



10th Apr '16 12:37:00 PM bobfrank
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** In "Justice", Worf tells Riker rather emphatically how he could only ever have a Klingon woman as a LoveInterest. Then [[Series/StarTrekDeepSpaceNine DS9]] happened.
24th Mar '16 3:16:24 AM Anicomicgeek
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* NightmareFuel: Has [[NightmareFuel/StarTrekTheNextGeneration its own page]].



* ReplacementScrappy: Dr. Pulaski in season 2 for Dr. Crusher (Crusher was PutOnABus to take a position as head of Starfleet Medical). Disliked not so much for the fact that she was not Dr. Crusher as for her [[DrJerk abrasive, unsympathetic and arrogant personality]] despite characters [[CreatorsPet regularly claiming otherwise]]. She did have her moments, though.


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* ReplacementScrappy: Dr. Pulaski in season 2 for Dr. Crusher (Crusher was PutOnABus to take a position as head of Starfleet Medical). Disliked not so much for the fact that she was not Dr. Crusher as for her [[DrJerk abrasive, unsympathetic and arrogant personality]] despite characters [[CreatorsPet regularly claiming otherwise]]. She did have her moments, though.
20th Mar '16 5:00:00 PM jameygamer
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** Data's [[CainAndAbel brother]] [[PsychoPrototype Lore]] is a thoroughly unsympathetic android who kills his creator, [[BigBrotherBully reprograms his brother to follow his every command]], and threatens to set teenage Wesley on fire. He summoned the Crystalline Entity to his creator's colony when the other colonists petitioned Soong to deactivate him out of fear that he would turn on them, and since then, he's been on quest to wipe out all organic life from the universe. If he ever shows affection, it's just to manipulate Data into collaborating. He also tried to make the Borg an even greater threat to TheFederation than they already were. Given everything else we saw of his true nature, it's obvious that he mostly did it for his own sick amusement.

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** Data's [[CainAndAbel brother]] [[PsychoPrototype Lore]] Lore]], one of the nastiest and most deranged villains in the entire ''Star Trek'' franchise, is a thoroughly unsympathetic android who kills his creator, [[BigBrotherBully reprograms his brother to follow his every command]], and threatens to set teenage Wesley on fire. He summoned the Crystalline Entity to his creator's colony when the other colonists petitioned Soong to deactivate him out of fear that he would turn on them, and since then, he's been on quest to wipe out all organic life from the universe. If he ever shows affection, it's just to manipulate Data into collaborating. He also tried to make the Borg an even greater threat to TheFederation than they already were. Given everything else we saw of his true nature, it's obvious that he mostly did it for his own sick amusement.
2nd Mar '16 9:43:35 PM kkhohoho
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* UnderminedByReality: Even worse than the original series. The series follows Gene Roddenberry's vision of the future: Earth has embraced enlightened beliefs and has "outgrown" things like greed, grief, conflict and the need for money and things like contemporary 1980s culture was seen as barbaric at best. This is at odds with Gene's rather shady business ethics and the show's writers participated in a writer's strike for an increase in pay, However, it should be said that most of the writers didn't share Gene's vision, often frustrated that their scripts were often rejected or changed for the worse and they began abandoning the his vision as Gene involvement in the series decreased.

to:

* UnderminedByReality: Even worse than the original series. The series follows Gene Roddenberry's vision of the future: Earth has embraced enlightened beliefs and has "outgrown" things like greed, grief, conflict and the need for money and things like contemporary 1980s culture was seen as barbaric at best. This is at odds with Gene's rather shady business ethics and the show's writers participated in a writer's strike for an increase in pay, However, it should be said that most of the writers didn't share Gene's vision, often frustrated that their scripts were often rejected or changed for the worse and they began abandoning the his vision as Gene involvement in the series decreased.
10th Feb '16 8:19:37 AM Omeganian
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** It has been [[http://www.stardestroyer.net/Empire/Database/Query-ST.php?EpName=Face%20of%20the%20Enemy pointed out]] on Website/StarDestroyerDotNet that there are some interesting parallels between Deseve from" [[Recap/StarTrekTheNextGenerationS6E13FaceOfTheEnemy Face of the Enemy]]" and [[https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Walker_Lindh John Walker Lindh]].
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=YMMV.StarTrekTheNextGeneration