History YMMV / StarTrekDeepSpaceNine

11th Dec '17 1:54:39 PM Anddrix
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* LoveItOrHateIt: The episode "In the Pale Moonlight." Niners point to it as one of the best episodes of the series because Sisko realizes he must put aside his long-held Federation principles to win the war. Trekkies who hate Deep Space 9 point to this episode and say it's a betrayal of Gene Roddenberry's vision of a better humanity for the exact same reason.
** Vic Fontaine. People either like him as he genuinely helps the main characters to get through difficult times and either carried or added depth to what are seen as good episodes (It's Only A Paper Moon and The Siege Of AR-558 being the best examples). Or they hate him because of his SpotlightStealingSquad tendencies, taking his sweet time for his stories that could have been used to flesh out more Ezri Dax, the Dominion War, Dukat post-Waltz, etc. Although for a CreatorsPet to be able to reach this point, this is one hell of an accomplishment.
9th Dec '17 6:19:07 AM OlfinBedwere
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* CommonKnowledge: It's a common misconception that all Vorta are clones... they aren't. The Vorta are said to be experts at cloning, not all clones. It's hinted that only Vorta that prove themselves to be exceptional in some way are rewarded with a form of immortality through cloning. In fact, of all the Vorta seen on-screen in the show, only ''two'' are specifically mentioned as being clones, namely Weyoun and Yelgrun. That being said, the relaunch novels indicate that cloned Vorta have gradually become the norm by the time of the show's setting, due to the more useful and Vorta getting repeatedly cloned by the Founders, whereas useless or treacherous Vorta are just left to rot after they die.

to:

* CommonKnowledge: It's a common misconception that all Vorta are clones... they aren't. The Vorta are said to be experts at cloning, not all clones. It's hinted that only Vorta that prove themselves to be exceptional in some way are rewarded with a form of immortality through cloning. In fact, of all the Vorta seen on-screen in the show, only ''two'' are specifically mentioned as being clones, namely Weyoun and Yelgrun. That being said, the relaunch novels indicate that cloned Vorta have gradually become the norm by the time of the show's setting, due to the more useful and competent Vorta getting repeatedly cloned by the Founders, whereas useless or treacherous Vorta are just left to rot after they die.
9th Dec '17 6:17:08 AM OlfinBedwere
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* CommonKnowledge: It's a common misconception that all Vorta are clones... they aren't. The Vorta are said to be experts at cloning, not all clones. It's hinted that only Vorta that prove themselves to be exceptional in some way are rewarded with a form of immortality through cloning. In fact, of all the Vorta seen on-screen in the show, only ''two'' are specifically mentioned as being clones, namely Weyoun and Yelgrun. That being said, the relaunch novels indicate that cloned Vorta have gradually become the norm by the time of the show's setting, due to the more useful and Vorta getting repeatedly cloned by the Founders, whereas useless or treacherous Vorta are just left to rot after they die.



*** Jeffrey Combs' first job as Weyoun was so impressive, the producers came up with the idea of all the Vorta being clones for the sole reason of bringing him back.
*** It's actually a common misconception that all Vorta are clones...they aren't. The Vorta are said to be experts at cloning, not all clones. It's hinted that only Vorta that prove themselves to be exceptional in some way are rewarded with a form of immortality through cloning. Weyoun *specifically* said that there was an original Weyoun who was not a clone.

to:

*** Jeffrey Combs' first job as Weyoun was so impressive, the producers came up with the idea of all the Vorta being clones cloning for the sole reason of bringing him back.
*** It's actually a common misconception that all Vorta are clones...they aren't. The Vorta are said to be experts at cloning, not all clones. It's hinted that only Vorta that prove themselves to be exceptional in some way are rewarded with a form of immortality through cloning. Weyoun *specifically* said that there was an original Weyoun who was not a clone.
back.
8th Dec '17 12:29:26 PM OlfinBedwere
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* TheyWastedAPerfectlyGoodCharacter: On the level of a whole organization. The Maquis were created entirely to set up the situation on ''Voyager'', with little thought to what role they could play on ''Deep Space Nine''. The result is that besides [[spoiler:Eddington]] they never become more than generic terrorists despite their quite understandable motivations. And when the story reached a point where they might have an interesting role to play, they were unceremoniously wiped out between episodes.

to:

* TheyWastedAPerfectlyGoodCharacter: On the level of a whole organization. The Maquis were created entirely to set up the situation on ''Voyager'', with little thought to what role they could play on ''Deep Space Nine''. The result is that besides [[spoiler:Eddington]] they never become more than generic terrorists despite their quite understandable motivations. And when the story reached a point where they might have an interesting role to play, they were unceremoniously wiped out between episodes. Despite this, out of the three shows that featured the Maquis, this one ''still'' made probably the best use of them (they were introduced too late in the run of ''The Next Generation'' for that show to do much of anything with them, while ExecutiveMeddling over on ''Voyager'' resulted in the "no conflict" rule being strictly enforced, quickly rendering the former Maquis officers functionally no different to their Starfleet counterparts).
26th Nov '17 5:08:47 AM OlfinBedwere
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Some fans even felt that the Klingons' suspicion that Changelings had infiltrated and taken over the Cardassian Union at the start of Season 4 was actually quite reasonable, and that while the Federation shouldn't have actively supported their invasion due to Prime Directive considerations, they should at least have stayed neutral in the conflict rather than condemning it.



* {{Misblamed}}: Ronald D. Moore sometimes gets heat for the darker nature of the latter seasons, as well as the show more whole-heartedly embracing the religious aspects of the Prophets after depicting them as a race of {{Sufficiently Advanced Alien}}s early on, things which would later become a hallmark of ''Series/BattlestarGalactica2003''. While he certainly had a lot of pull in the writing staff, Moore was never the showrunner on this or any other ''Franchise/StarTrek'' show; Ira Steven Behr was the showrunner for all but the first two seasons of this show, with his main co-writer being Robert Hewitt Wolfe until the end of Season 5, and Hans Beimler thereafter.



** "Extreme Measures". Ron Moore succeeded a little ''too'' well in creating Sloan. Weren't Section 31 supposed to be big thinkers? To trap Sloan behind a forcefield seems a bit easy (hell, the ''Jem'Hadar'' would laugh at something like that!) and introducing a 'Good' Sloan ("thanks, Muffin!") in his dreamscape is even cheesier. Good!Sloan's speech about wishing he were more like Bashir smacks of revisionism; it's as if someone upstairs was nervous about keeping Section 31 in canon, and this episode was a half-measure to appease the critics. But you gotta love Bashir’s simple way of shutting Sloan up: turn off the forcefield and shoot him!

to:

** "Extreme Measures". Ron Moore The writers succeeded a little ''too'' well in creating Sloan. Weren't Section 31 supposed to be big thinkers? To trap Sloan behind a forcefield seems a bit easy (hell, the ''Jem'Hadar'' would laugh at something like that!) and introducing a 'Good' Sloan ("thanks, Muffin!") in his dreamscape is even cheesier. Good!Sloan's speech about wishing he were more like Bashir smacks of revisionism; it's as if someone upstairs was nervous about keeping Section 31 in canon, and this episode was a half-measure to appease the critics. But you gotta love Bashir’s simple way of shutting Sloan up: turn off the forcefield and shoot him!
19th Nov '17 4:23:48 AM OlfinBedwere
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* TrappedByMountainLions: With the B-stories in episodes quite often having nothing whatsoever to do with the main storyline -- the writers later admitted that it wasn't uncommon for them to lift a B-story from one script and drop it into another one -- this trope can crop up from time to time. In the first season this tended to manifest in an excess of subplots focusing on Jake and Nog, which quickly grew repetitive, while mid-series the writers sometimes tried throwing light-hearted subplots into more drama-heavy episodes to make them more "balanced out," causing severe MoodWhiplash.
15th Nov '17 2:48:12 AM HighCrate
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** The episode "Children of Time". The crew of the Defiant finds out they're supposed to crash and found a colony. A huge point is made out of the seeming necessity for them to give up their lives and everything they care about in the present so they can have these descendants, even having one of them die from illness rather than survive. Yep, just people who have to give up their careers, personal lives, and even health to have kids, and almost no one seriously objects to the necessity of this. It all sounds very pro-life.
14th Nov '17 9:38:45 PM HighCrate
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Season 4 had an episode titled "Rules of Engagement", in which an esteemed officer (Worf) gets accused of attacking and killing innocent civilians. Wait, wasn't this a 2000 film starring Creator/SamuelLJackson and Creator/TommyLeeJones?



** Ronald D. Moore writing for a show where [[Series/BattlestarGalactica2003 one of the alien races can survive death via cloned bodies, making them effectively immortal, and another can perfectly mimic humans and pretend to be allies.]]



** Sisko's middle name Lafayette, after ''Theatre/{{Hamilton}}'' gave the historical Lafayette a similar MemeticBadass treatment to Sisko's reputation among the fans. Plus, there's several episodes where he has to get his hands on a bunch of guns and ships.
14th Nov '17 9:35:40 PM HighCrate
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** In the episode "Sanctuary," one of the Skrreea, Tumak is killed in an accident. His actor, Andrew Koenig, son of [[Series/StarTrekTheOriginalSeries Walter Koenig,]] was found dead in 2010.
* HeartwarmingInHindsight: Terry Farrell would later be romantically attached to Leonard Nimoy's son Adam.
14th Nov '17 9:25:54 PM HighCrate
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* BrokenBase: The Dominion War itself. DarkerAndEdgier plot arc that breathed new life into a stagnant franchise? Ron Moore deciding to do a test run for Series/BattlestarGalactica2003, and applying a chainsaw and flamethower to everything that made Star Trek different from everything else on the air by sinking everything to BlackAndGrayMorality at best? A higher-budget rip-off of Series/BabylonFive's Shadow War arc?
This list shows the last 10 events of 586. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=YMMV.StarTrekDeepSpaceNine