History YMMV / Psycho

22nd Mar '17 4:31:43 PM Mdumas43073
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* GenreTurningPoint: In addition to marking, for some, the end of UsefulNotes/TheGoldenAgeOfHollywood, Psycho is seen to have heralded modern American cinema. Critics note that ''Psycho'' more or less codified and defined the new mainstream of American cinema. Instead of idealized stars, you had characters playing normal people, at least relative to the mainstream of the time. More importantly it blurred the line between high and low art, with crude pulp material (dealing with illicit sex, robbery and a depraved SerialKiller) becoming as profitable, if not more so than the EpicMovie, TheWestern, TheMusical and other prestige films which Hollywood, before and after ''Psycho'', still saw as their major bread-and-butter, but by the end of TheSixties had become unfashionable and unpopular.

to:

* GenreTurningPoint: In addition to marking, for some, the end of UsefulNotes/TheGoldenAgeOfHollywood, Psycho is seen to have heralded modern American cinema. Critics note that ''Psycho'' is heralded by many critics as more or less codified codifying and defined defining the new mainstream of American cinema. Instead of idealized stars, you had characters playing normal people, at least relative to the mainstream of the time. More importantly it blurred the line between high and low art, with crude pulp material (dealing with illicit sex, robbery and a depraved SerialKiller) becoming as profitable, if not more so than the EpicMovie, TheWestern, TheMusical and other prestige films which Hollywood, before and after ''Psycho'', still saw as their major bread-and-butter, but by the end of TheSixties had become unfashionable and unpopular.
21st Mar '17 10:33:39 PM Mdumas43073
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

** Marion's fate could also be seen as an ''extreme'' application of "crime does not pay". She never would have ended up where she did if she hadn't embezzled the money from Mr. Cassidy in the first place.
25th Feb '17 9:37:17 PM JulianLapostat
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

25th Feb '17 9:37:04 PM JulianLapostat
Is there an issue? Send a Message


[[folder: Hitchcock's films]]

to:

[[folder: Hitchcock's films]]film]]



* FamilyUnfriendlyAesop: The film teaches viewers to be wary of strangers. Just because someone looks or seems like a normal person doesn't mean that you should immediately trust them. Otherwise, you could end up dead or in serious harm if you misjudge someone mysterious. As Marion Crane found out the hard way.

to:

* FamilyUnfriendlyAesop: FamilyUnfriendlyAesop:
**
The film teaches viewers audience to be wary of strangers. Just because someone looks or seems like a normal person doesn't mean that you should immediately trust them. Otherwise, you could end up dead or in serious harm if you misjudge someone mysterious. As Marion Crane found out the hard way.way.
** Most shockingly, at least on early release, the film emphasizes that a SerialKiller can reside in and inhabit any community, even one that is potentially normal, and unassuming. The sheriff's shock at the end about Norman Bates' true nature, the fact that he had killed others before Marion and most people didn't notice it, only highlights the general paranoia that still makes the film very scary.


Added DiffLines:

* GenreTurningPoint: In addition to marking, for some, the end of UsefulNotes/TheGoldenAgeOfHollywood, Psycho is seen to have heralded modern American cinema. Critics note that ''Psycho'' more or less codified and defined the new mainstream of American cinema. Instead of idealized stars, you had characters playing normal people, at least relative to the mainstream of the time. More importantly it blurred the line between high and low art, with crude pulp material (dealing with illicit sex, robbery and a depraved SerialKiller) becoming as profitable, if not more so than the EpicMovie, TheWestern, TheMusical and other prestige films which Hollywood, before and after ''Psycho'', still saw as their major bread-and-butter, but by the end of TheSixties had become unfashionable and unpopular.


Added DiffLines:

[[/folder]]
25th Feb '17 9:22:07 PM JulianLapostat
Is there an issue? Send a Message


[[foldercontrol]]
[[folder: Hitchcock's films]]



** The first sequel is composed by Music/JerryGoldsmith.
* BigLippedAlligatorMoment: The 1998 remake has random, near-subliminal video clips (storm clouds, a sheep in a road, a woman in bondage gear) which pop up during the two murder scenes.
* CreatorBacklash: In an interview with American Movie Classics not long before his death, Anthony Perkins mentioned that he felt his directorial effort on ''Psycho III'' wasn't as good as he'd like due to his inexperience. It's worth mentioning that despite this, the cast and crew is said to have enjoyed the experience of working with him.
* EnsembleDarkhorse: Dr. Raymond from ''Psycho II'' is a minor, but faithful ally to Norman Bates. Considering that he's trying to help Norman resume a normal life [[spoiler: and derail Lila's EvilPlan to drive him insane again]], it's no wonder why this small character somewhat appreciated. By coincidence, he also happens to be the ''only'' helpful male character working with Norman.
* EvilIsSexy: Mrs. Bates in the ''Psycho IV'' flashbacks.



* FanPreferredCouple:
** Norman and Maureen from ''Psycho III'' were the only couple with the most chemistry.
** Norman and Mary in "Psycho II" was quite popular too. As their chemistry was very believable and Mary was a very likable character.
* FridgeHorror:
** In the shot that pulls back from Marion's eye, it is possible to see her throat moving just slightly. Presumably this was simply because Janet Leigh couldn't remain totally still during the rather complicated shot, but if one likes, there is a more chilling interpretation: that Marion, while mortally wounded, ''wasn't quite dead yet'' and wouldn't be until she was put in the car and drowned in the swamp.
** In ''Psycho II'', it's revealed that there was also a peephole drilled in between Norman's bathroom and his mother's room that he never knew about. If you remember his [[DirtyOldWoman mother]], then you know [[ParentalIncest why that peephole exists]].

to:

* FanPreferredCouple:
** Norman and Maureen from ''Psycho III'' were the only couple with the most chemistry.
** Norman and Mary in "Psycho II" was quite popular too. As their chemistry was very believable and Mary was a very likable character.
* FridgeHorror:
**
FridgeHorror: In the shot that pulls back from Marion's eye, it is possible to see her throat moving just slightly. Presumably this was simply because Janet Leigh couldn't remain totally still during the rather complicated shot, but if one likes, there is a more chilling interpretation: that Marion, while mortally wounded, ''wasn't quite dead yet'' and wouldn't be until she was put in the car and drowned in the swamp.
** In ''Psycho II'', it's revealed that there was also a peephole drilled in between Norman's bathroom and his mother's room that he never knew about. If you remember his [[DirtyOldWoman mother]], then you know [[ParentalIncest why that peephole exists]].
swamp.



* HilariousInHindsight:
** ''Psycho'' was released 6 years after Hitchcock's ''Film/RearWindow,'' where the character of Stella questions where Thorwald, the suspected murderer, would've killed his wife in their apartment. "Of course, ''the bathtub''! It's the only place he could've washed the blood!"
** In the sequel ''PsychoII'', Norman's motel is run by a {{jerkass}} drug dealer admitting prostitutes, perverts, and drug addicts into rooms. The previous motel manager from ''Series/BatesMotel'' was human trafficker who also dealt drugs on the side.
* ItWasHisSled: At this late date, it's hard to find anybody who isn't familiar with the original movie's plot twists, whether they've actually seen it or not.
* JerkassWoobie: Lila in the second movie. She's motivated by Norman murdering her sister, so you can understand her personal grief and why she continues to fill the role of the HeroAntagonist to Norman's VillainProtagonist, as well as filling the role of a WellIntentionedExtremist due to her methods. However, she is [[HeWhoFightsMonsters downright vindictive towards a person that paid his debt to society and trying to move on with his life]], so she is not ''that'' sympathetic.

to:

* HilariousInHindsight:
**
HilariousInHindsight: ''Psycho'' was released 6 years after Hitchcock's ''Film/RearWindow,'' where the character of Stella questions where Thorwald, the suspected murderer, would've killed his wife in their apartment. "Of course, ''the bathtub''! It's the only place he could've washed the blood!"
** In the sequel ''PsychoII'', Norman's motel is run by a {{jerkass}} drug dealer admitting prostitutes, perverts, and drug addicts into rooms. The previous motel manager from ''Series/BatesMotel'' was human trafficker who also dealt drugs on the side.
* ItWasHisSled: At this late date, it's hard to find anybody who isn't familiar with the original movie's plot twists, whether they've actually seen it or not.
* JerkassWoobie: Lila
not, mostly because Norman Bates has become one of the most iconic characters not only in film history but in the second movie. She's motivated by Norman murdering her sister, so you can understand her personal grief and why she continues to fill the role of the HeroAntagonist to Norman's VillainProtagonist, as well as filling the role of a WellIntentionedExtremist due to her methods. However, she is [[HeWhoFightsMonsters downright vindictive towards a person that paid his debt to society and trying to move on with his life]], so she is not ''that'' sympathetic.20th Century.



* MoneyMakingShot: From ''Psycho II'', the shot of a shadowed Norman standing outside his house in the dark as his "mother" watches by the window.
* MoralEventHorizon: It's very likely that Norma Bates passed it long ago, but she became the most monstrous character in the series when we find out about all the despicable abuses she tormented her son with.

to:

* MoneyMakingShot: From ''Psycho II'', the shot MyRealDaddy: One of a shadowed Norman standing outside his house in the dark as his "mother" watches by the window.
* MoralEventHorizon: It's very likely that Norma Bates passed it long ago, but she became
the most monstrous character notorious controversies about the film is the claim that Saul Bass made in the series end of TheSixties that ''he'' and not Hitchcock directed the famous "shower scene". In addition to designing the title sequence of the film, Bass has a credit for "Pictorial Consultant" and in that capacity designed storyboards for both the shower scene and the Arbogast Murder scene.
** The reason for this controversy is Hitchcock's fault. During production, he and Bass had a falling out. And then in his famous interviews with Creator/FrancoisTruffaut, Hitchcock deprecated Bass
when we find out about all Truffaut brought up the despicable abuses she tormented her son with.Pictorial Consultant credit, stating that Bass designed storyboards for the Arbogast murder which Hitchcock didn't use [[SelfServingMemory and completely neglected Bass' contribution to the shower scene]]. Bass [[BerserkButton was naturally upset at what he saw as a deliberate lie of omission]].
** Later authors having consulted the storyboards note that Bass more or less did design the shower scene, the silhouette of the mother behind the curtains, the knife through the curtains and even details like the circular shower-head which rhymes with the Iris of Marion and then the drainage hole of the tub (which was similar to the spiral of ''Vertigo''). The sequence was also quite unusual since Hitchcock rarely used such a montage of shots in his films. In either case, Hitchcock did direct the scene since he was on set and he more or less did delegate Bass to take on a bigger role than before[[note]]Properly managing your ProductionPosse is closer to what directors do than outright make stuff up[[/note]] but the shower sequence is as much Bass' as it is Hitchcock's even if the former did not as he tried to claim "direct it".



** The last shot of ''Psycho III.'' Anyone else suddenly want to hum some Creator/TomLehrer?
* NarmCharm: Not everyone dislikes the psychiatrist's scene.

to:

** The last shot of ''Psycho III.'' Anyone else suddenly want to hum some Creator/TomLehrer?
* NarmCharm: Not everyone dislikes the psychiatrist's scene. Mostly because the actor is deliberately over-the-top, it relieves some of the tension and that there was no other way to dispatch so much exposition economically given the constraints and structure of the film.



* ParanoiaFuel: Every film involves someone spying on another person through purposely constructed peepholes drilled in the bathrooms.
* TheScrappy: The psychiatrist is considered one for his long-winded scene that comes at the end of the film, which states information that should be largely obvious by the end. He is also happened to be an UnwittingInstigatorOfDoom in the sequel ''Psycho II'', due to his diagnosis of Norman being permanently insane provokes Lila (who was present at the psychiatrist's hearing) to [[WellIntentionedExtremist staunchly]] believe Norman is this and attempts to [[spoiler: drive Norman insane again to get him recommitted]] when he is released and [[spoiler: initially]] indeed cured of his insanity.
* {{Sequelitis}}:
** Averted with the surprisingly-good ''Psycho II''. YMMV on the other sequels, but the common consensus seems to be that ''Psycho III'' is visually interesting but flawed and lacking in depth, whereas ''Psycho IV'' is just plain lousy, albeit not completely awful. The remake and the 1987 film ''Bates Motel'' [[FanonDiscontinuity do not count]].
** This also occurred with a different sequel to the original novel, and another plot was bandied about elsewhere: with Norman being released, found to be cured, back into the general populace. [[spoiler: Except it was the 70s, when he went away in the early 60s. The eponymous "psycho" would have been the Anvilicious world around him.]]
** The prequel ''series'' Series/BatesMotel, on the other hand, is considered to be rather good.

to:

* ParanoiaFuel: Every The film involves someone spying on another person through purposely constructed peepholes drilled in the bathrooms.
* TheScrappy: The psychiatrist
bathrooms, and an affable handsome young man, who is considered one for his long-winded scene that comes at the end of the film, which states information that should be largely obvious by the end. He is also happened to be an UnwittingInstigatorOfDoom in the sequel ''Psycho II'', due to his diagnosis of Norman outwardly normal being permanently an insane provokes Lila (who was present at the psychiatrist's hearing) to [[WellIntentionedExtremist staunchly]] believe Norman is this and attempts to [[spoiler: drive Norman insane again to get him recommitted]] when he is released and [[spoiler: initially]] indeed cured of his insanity.
* {{Sequelitis}}:
** Averted with the surprisingly-good ''Psycho II''. YMMV on the other sequels, but the common consensus seems to be that ''Psycho III'' is visually interesting but flawed and lacking in depth, whereas ''Psycho IV'' is just plain lousy, albeit not completely awful. The remake and the 1987 film ''Bates Motel'' [[FanonDiscontinuity do not count]].
** This also occurred with a different sequel to the original novel, and another plot was bandied about elsewhere: with Norman being released, found to be cured, back into the general populace. [[spoiler: Except it was the 70s, when he went away in the early 60s. The eponymous "psycho" would have been the Anvilicious world around him.]]
** The prequel ''series'' Series/BatesMotel, on the other hand, is considered to be rather good.
SerialKiller.



* SoOkayItsAverage: ''Psycho III'' is not as good as the first two films, but it's surprisingly entertaining on its own.
* SpecialEffectFailure: The infamously poor back-projection used when Arbogast falls down the stairs before his death. Bizarrely, both ''Psycho III'' and the 1998 remake recreate the scene with ''worse'' back-projection, and the remake also adds unconvincing CGI wounds that are superimposed on William H. Macy's face.
* TakeThatScrappy: In ''Psycho IV'', the therapist who diagnosed Bates at the end of the first movie is called out on his bullshit by none other than Creator/CCHPounder.
* ToughActToFollow: ''Psycho'' is looked at as Hitch's peek, as virtually none of the films he made afterward even came close to the level of recognition and acclaim that this one did, and while ''Film/TheBirds'' is still considered a classic, it's also comparatively paint-by-numbers as far as Hitchcock movies go.

to:

* SoOkayItsAverage: ''Psycho III'' is not as good as the first two films, but it's surprisingly entertaining on its own.
* SpecialEffectFailure: The infamously poor back-projection used when Arbogast falls down the stairs before his death. Bizarrely, both ''Psycho III'' and the 1998 remake recreate the scene with ''worse'' back-projection, and the remake also adds unconvincing CGI wounds that are superimposed on William H. Macy's face.
* TakeThatScrappy: In ''Psycho IV'', the therapist who diagnosed Bates at the end of the first movie is called out on his bullshit by none other than Creator/CCHPounder.
* ToughActToFollow:
ToughActToFollow:
**
''Psycho'' is looked at as Hitch's peek, as virtually none peak of the cultural appeal and influence. None of his films he made afterward even came close to the level of recognition and acclaim that this one did, and while were as commercially successful or culturally impactful. ''Film/TheBirds'' is still considered a classic, it's classic and a pioneer in special effects and sound design, but it was not as big of a sensation as ''Psycho'' and while ''Film/{{Marnie}}'' is now considered his final masterpiece, it was critically disliked and commercially unsuccessful.
** ''Psycho'' is
also comparatively paint-by-numbers as far as a final hurrah for Hitchcock's ProductionPosse in general. It was the last film Saul Bass designed titles for, on account of a personal and professional falling out. It was Hitchcock's final film for Paramount Studios (where he had made all his great films in TheFifties). In the following years, his longtime editor and cinematographer George Tomasssini and Robert Burks respectively would pass away, and Hitchcock movies go.would have another falling out with Music/BernardHerrmann. So it was in a real sense an EndOfAnAge for Hitchcock.
** As noted above the


Added DiffLines:

* TheWoobie: Marion Crane made a terrible impulsive mistake, came to regret it and was going to make amends but [[spoiler:ended up being murdered brutally with her final fate being more or less one of many of Norman's ghoulish and unfortunate victims]].
[[/folder]]

[[folder: Sequels and Remake]]
* SugarWiki/AwesomeMusic: The first sequel is composed by Music/JerryGoldsmith.
* BigLippedAlligatorMoment: The 1998 remake has random, near-subliminal video clips (storm clouds, a sheep in a road, a woman in bondage gear) which pop up during the two murder scenes.
* CreatorBacklash: In an interview with American Movie Classics not long before his death, Anthony Perkins mentioned that he felt his directorial effort on ''Psycho III'' wasn't as good as he'd like due to his inexperience. It's worth mentioning that despite this, the cast and crew is said to have enjoyed the experience of working with him.
* EnsembleDarkhorse: Dr. Raymond from ''Psycho II'' is a minor, but faithful ally to Norman Bates. Considering that he's trying to help Norman resume a normal life [[spoiler: and derail Lila's EvilPlan to drive him insane again]], it's no wonder why this small character somewhat appreciated. By coincidence, he also happens to be the ''only'' helpful male character working with Norman.
* EvilIsSexy: Mrs. Bates in the ''Psycho IV'' flashbacks.
* FanPreferredCouple:
** Norman and Maureen from ''Psycho III'' were the only couple with the most chemistry.
** Norman and Mary in "Psycho II" was quite popular too. As their chemistry was very believable and Mary was a very likable character.
* FridgeHorror: In ''Psycho II'', it's revealed that there was also a peephole drilled in between Norman's bathroom and his mother's room that he never knew about. If you remember his [[DirtyOldWoman mother]], then you know [[ParentalIncest why that peephole exists]].
* HilariousInHindsight: In the sequel ''PsychoII'', Norman's motel is run by a {{jerkass}} drug dealer admitting prostitutes, perverts, and drug addicts into rooms. The previous motel manager from ''Series/BatesMotel'' was human trafficker who also dealt drugs on the side.
* JerkassWoobie: Lila in the second movie. She's motivated by Norman murdering her sister, so you can understand her personal grief and why she continues to fill the role of the HeroAntagonist to Norman's VillainProtagonist, as well as filling the role of a WellIntentionedExtremist due to her methods. However, she is [[HeWhoFightsMonsters downright vindictive towards a person that paid his debt to society and trying to move on with his life]], so she is not ''that'' sympathetic.
* MoneyMakingShot: From ''Psycho II'', the shot of a shadowed Norman standing outside his house in the dark as his "mother" watches by the window.
* MoralEventHorizon: It's very likely that Norma Bates passed it long ago, but she became the most monstrous character in the series when we find out about all the despicable abuses she tormented her son with.
* {{Narm}}: The last shot of ''Psycho III.'' Anyone else suddenly want to hum some Creator/TomLehrer?
* ParanoiaFuel: Every film involves someone spying on another person through purposely constructed peepholes drilled in the bathrooms.
* TheScrappy: The psychiatrist is considered one for his long-winded scene that comes at the end of the film, which states information that should be largely obvious by the end. He is also happened to be an UnwittingInstigatorOfDoom in the sequel ''Psycho II'', due to his diagnosis of Norman being permanently insane provokes Lila (who was present at the psychiatrist's hearing) to [[WellIntentionedExtremist staunchly]] believe Norman is this and attempts to [[spoiler: drive Norman insane again to get him recommitted]] when he is released and [[spoiler: initially]] indeed cured of his insanity.
* {{Sequelitis}}:
** Averted with the surprisingly-good ''Psycho II''. YMMV on the other sequels, but the common consensus seems to be that ''Psycho III'' is visually interesting but flawed and lacking in depth, whereas ''Psycho IV'' is just plain lousy, albeit not completely awful. The remake and the 1987 film ''Bates Motel'' [[FanonDiscontinuity do not count]].
** This also occurred with a different sequel to the original novel, and another plot was bandied about elsewhere: with Norman being released, found to be cured, back into the general populace. [[spoiler: Except it was the 70s, when he went away in the early 60s. The eponymous "psycho" would have been the Anvilicious world around him.]]
** The prequel ''series'' Series/BatesMotel, on the other hand, is considered to be rather good.
* SoOkayItsAverage: ''Psycho III'' is not as good as the first two films, but it's surprisingly entertaining on its own.
* TakeThatScrappy: In ''Psycho IV'', the therapist who diagnosed Bates at the end of the first movie is called out on his bullshit by none other than Creator/CCHPounder.
7th Jan '17 1:09:59 AM SeptimusHeap
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* FreudWasRight:
** Norman's FreudianExcuse and sexual repression are probably what drove him insane. Then there's the shower scene, where the knife stabbing is often interpreted as a phallic symbol.
** Another example, a personal one for Norman: at one point he's clearly stuttering and hesitating to say "fallacious", because it sounds like "phallus". He eventually settles on saying "falsity".
5th Jan '17 2:37:33 PM KingClark
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* SugarWiki/AwesomeMusic: Composed, once again, by BernardHerrmann.

to:

* SugarWiki/AwesomeMusic: SugarWiki/AwesomeMusic:
**
Composed, once again, by BernardHerrmann.



* CreatorBacklash: In an interview with American Movie Classics not long before his death, Anthony Perkins mentioned that he felt his directorial effort on Psycho III wasn't as good as he'd like due to his inexperience.
** It's worth mentioning that despite this, the cast and crew is said to have enjoyed the experience of working with him.
* EnsembleDarkhorse: Dr. Raymond from ''PsychoII'' is a minor, but faithful ally to Norman Bates. Considering that he's trying to help Norman resume a normal life [[spoiler: and derail Lila's EvilPlan to drive him insane again]], it's no wonder why this small character somewhat appreciated. By coincidence, he also happens to be the ''only'' helpful male character working with Norman.
* EvilIsSexy:
** Mrs. Bates in the ''Psycho IV'' flashbacks is this to some people.

to:

* CreatorBacklash: In an interview with American Movie Classics not long before his death, Anthony Perkins mentioned that he felt his directorial effort on Psycho III ''Psycho III'' wasn't as good as he'd like due to his inexperience.
**
inexperience. It's worth mentioning that despite this, the cast and crew is said to have enjoyed the experience of working with him.
* EnsembleDarkhorse: Dr. Raymond from ''PsychoII'' ''Psycho II'' is a minor, but faithful ally to Norman Bates. Considering that he's trying to help Norman resume a normal life [[spoiler: and derail Lila's EvilPlan to drive him insane again]], it's no wonder why this small character somewhat appreciated. By coincidence, he also happens to be the ''only'' helpful male character working with Norman.
* EvilIsSexy:
**
EvilIsSexy: Mrs. Bates in the ''Psycho IV'' flashbacks is this to some people.flashbacks.



* FanPreferredCouple: Norman and Maureen from ''Psycho III'' were the only couple with the most chemistry.

to:

* FanPreferredCouple: FanPreferredCouple:
**
Norman and Maureen from ''Psycho III'' were the only couple with the most chemistry.



* FreudWasRight: Norman's FreudianExcuse and sexual repression are probably what drove him insane. Then there's the shower scene, where the knife stabbing is often interpreted as a phallic symbol.

to:

* FreudWasRight: FreudWasRight:
**
Norman's FreudianExcuse and sexual repression are probably what drove him insane. Then there's the shower scene, where the knife stabbing is often interpreted as a phallic symbol.



* TheWoobie: Norman. He's so ''epically'' messed up. His father dies when he is 5 (it's never made clear how this happened). After this, his mother deliberately isolates and dominates him, making him dependent on her. She also fills his head with how sinful and evil women are. Then she shows up with a man when Norman is age 12. At this point, there are two possibilities: Norman is angry and jealous and kills both mother and her lover. Or, Mrs Bates kills both herself and her lover (remember the deceased Mr Bates). For option A, Norman is wracked with guilt and retrieves his mother's corpse as well as internalising her in order to alleviate his remorse. For option B, Norman simply assumes guilt for his mother's death (easier than confronting her abandonment of him) - and then internalises her. Either way, the woman who was responsible for his abusive childhood now ''lives inside his head'', berating, watching, punishing - no peace, nowhere to hide. Norman's trap is his own mind, and he can't escape. Hitchcock deliberately cast Anthony Perkins in the role to emphasise Norman's woobie quality. The sequels trade heavily on it, too - especially ''Psycho II''.
** You may feel even worse for him in the second movie, as you know all of this going in. We see that he served his time and met the requirements to be released. He so desperately tries to get his life in order and maintain his newfound sanity, but he's being pushed over the edge due to a personal vendetta.
** In ''Psycho IV'', we see how awful Norman's childhood was. His mother was insane and demeaned him, killing her didn't help him escape her, and he is considering putting down his [[spoiler: pregnant wife, because he doesn't want his unborn child to inherit his insanity. We cheer when that awful house finally goes up in flames, along with his poisonous past.]]

to:

* TheWoobie: TheWoobie:
**
Norman. He's so ''epically'' messed up. His father dies when he is 5 (it's never made clear how this happened). After this, his mother deliberately isolates and dominates him, making him dependent on her. She also fills his head with how sinful and evil women are. Then she shows up with a man when Norman is age 12. At this point, there are two possibilities: Norman is angry and jealous and kills both mother and her lover. Or, Mrs Bates kills both herself and her lover (remember the deceased Mr Bates). For option A, Norman is wracked with guilt and retrieves his mother's corpse as well as internalising her in order to alleviate his remorse. For option B, Norman simply assumes guilt for his mother's death (easier than confronting her abandonment of him) - and then internalises her. Either way, the woman who was responsible for his abusive childhood now ''lives inside his head'', berating, watching, punishing - no peace, nowhere to hide. Norman's trap is his own mind, and he can't escape. Hitchcock deliberately cast Anthony Perkins in the role to emphasise Norman's woobie quality. The sequels trade heavily on it, too - especially ''Psycho II''.
** *** You may feel even worse for him in the second movie, as you know all of this going in. We see that he served his time and met the requirements to be released. He so desperately tries to get his life in order and maintain his newfound sanity, but he's being pushed over the edge due to a personal vendetta.
** *** In ''Psycho IV'', we see how awful Norman's childhood was. His mother was insane and demeaned him, killing her didn't help him escape her, and he is considering putting down his [[spoiler: pregnant wife, because he doesn't want his unborn child to inherit his insanity. We cheer when that awful house finally goes up in flames, along with his poisonous past.]]
5th Jan '17 2:35:45 PM KingClark
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* TheScrappy: The psychiatrist is considered one for his long-winded scene that comes at the end of the film, which states information that should be largely obvious by the end.
** He is also happened to be an UnwittingInstigatorOfDoom in the sequel ''Psycho II'', due to his diagnosis of Norman being permanently insane provokes Lila (who was present at the psychiatrist's hearing) to [[WellIntentionedExtremist staunchly]] believe Norman is this and attempts to [[spoiler: drive Norman insane again to get him recommitted]] when he is released and [[spoiler: initially]] indeed cured of his insanity.

to:

* TheScrappy: The psychiatrist is considered one for his long-winded scene that comes at the end of the film, which states information that should be largely obvious by the end.
**
end. He is also happened to be an UnwittingInstigatorOfDoom in the sequel ''Psycho II'', due to his diagnosis of Norman being permanently insane provokes Lila (who was present at the psychiatrist's hearing) to [[WellIntentionedExtremist staunchly]] believe Norman is this and attempts to [[spoiler: drive Norman insane again to get him recommitted]] when he is released and [[spoiler: initially]] indeed cured of his insanity.
5th Jan '17 2:35:08 PM KingClark
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* {{Narm}}: "Mother, oh God, mother...the blood! The blood!" Mostly because they are the only piece of dialogue in a lengthy segment with no dialogue at all and thus seem out of place.

to:

* {{Narm}}: {{Narm}}:
**
"Mother, oh God, mother...the blood! The blood!" Mostly because they are the only piece of dialogue in a lengthy segment with no dialogue at all and thus seem out of place.



* NarmCharm: Not everyone dislikes the psychiatrist' s scene.

to:

* NarmCharm: Not everyone dislikes the psychiatrist' s psychiatrist's scene.



* {{Sequelitis}}: Averted with the surprisingly-good ''Psycho II''. YMMV on the other sequels, but the common consensus seems to be that ''Psycho III'' is visually interesting but flawed and lacking in depth, whereas ''Psycho IV'' is just plain lousy, albeit not completely awful. The remake and the 1987 film ''Bates Motel'' [[FanonDiscontinuity do not count]].

to:

* {{Sequelitis}}: {{Sequelitis}}:
**
Averted with the surprisingly-good ''Psycho II''. YMMV on the other sequels, but the common consensus seems to be that ''Psycho III'' is visually interesting but flawed and lacking in depth, whereas ''Psycho IV'' is just plain lousy, albeit not completely awful. The remake and the 1987 film ''Bates Motel'' [[FanonDiscontinuity do not count]].
24th Nov '16 8:45:24 PM ImperialMajestyXO
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* SoOkayItsAverage: ''Psycho III'' is not as good as the first film, but it's surprisingly entertaining on its own.

to:

* SoOkayItsAverage: ''Psycho III'' is not as good as the first film, two films, but it's surprisingly entertaining on its own.
This list shows the last 10 events of 106. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=YMMV.Psycho