History YMMV / Monk

2nd Mar '17 1:24:02 AM DrPsyche
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* AlternateCharacterInterpretation: The show notes the death of his wife aggravated his anxieties but some wonder if it added a cold and often hidden edge to Monk. When Dale lunges for him in anger and cannot reach him on account of his weight, Monk leans in just out of Dale's reach and mocks him for his disability much like Dale had been mocking him for it the entire episode. When he meets the man who built the bomb that killed Trudy he turns off the man's morphine drip that he'd been put on for his terminal cancer (though he turns it back on as a sign of forgiveness). While he's only framed for the murder of the six fingered man, the Judge does note that Monk was easily able to grab his gun, and ignore his phobias of people and germs and take a bus over to meet this man alone. Some have wondered if Monk was hiding a more anti-heroic side.

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* AlternateCharacterInterpretation: The show notes the death of his wife aggravated his anxieties but some wonder if it added a cold and often hidden edge to Monk. When Dale lunges for him in anger and cannot reach him on account of his weight, Monk leans in just out of Dale's reach and mocks him for his disability much like Dale had been mocking him for it the entire episode. When he meets the man who built the bomb that killed Trudy he turns off the man's morphine drip that he'd been put on for his terminal cancer (though he turns it back on as a sign of forgiveness). While he's only framed for the murder of the six fingered man, the Judge does note that Monk was easily able to grab his gun, and ignore his phobias of people and germs and take a bus over to meet this man alone. Some have wondered if Maybe Monk was hiding a more anti-heroic side.side?
2nd Mar '17 1:23:25 AM DrPsyche
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* AlternateCharacterInterpretation: The show notes the death of his wife aggravated his anxieties but some wonder if it added a cold and often hidden edge to Monk. When Dale lunges for him in anger and cannot reach him on account of his weight, Monk leans in just out of Dale's reach and mocks him for his disability much like Dale had been mocking him for it the entire episode. When he meets the man who built the bomb that killed Trudy he turns off the man's morphine drip that he'd been put on for his terminal cancer (though he turns it back on as a sign of forgiveness). While he's only framed for the murder of the six fingered man, the Judge does note that Monk was easily able to grab his gun, and ignore his phobias of people and germs and take a bus over to meet this man alone. Some have wondered if Monk was hiding a more anti-heroic side.
2nd Mar '17 1:03:21 AM DrPsyche
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* {{Narm}}: In an obvious case of Monk only being as smart as the writers comes "Mr. Monk and the Game Show," wherein Monk's brought in to investigate a suspected game show cheating. The manager mentions he brought in all sorts of analysts, and only Monk can solve the problem. Except the way that they're cheating is very obvious and simple; the host is holding the card's corner to correspond to the A, B, C, or D answer.
11th Feb '17 10:39:12 AM Peridonyx
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* UnintentionallyUnsympathetic: In "Mr. Monk and the Red-Headed Stranger," it's revealed that the blind woman Mrs. Mass killed Jason "Sonny" Cross and falsely implicated Willie Nelson for the crime. It's also established that her motive was getting even with Sonny because he killed her parents in a DUI crash in the 1980s and got a light sentence for it. Where the trope comes into play is that to some, Mrs. Mass's actions were worse than anything Sonny Cross did. It is clear that Cross's actions were stupid, irresponsible and criminal, and the outcome of his actions was a tragedy, but he didn't intentionally go out and murder anyone. He wasn't even in his right mind, and we don't know anything about the trial. He may have pleaded guilty or no contest to two counts of vehicular manslaughter. Mrs. Mass, on the other hand, committed premeditated murder and then allowed an innocent man to be blamed (and perhaps even would have allowed him to be convicted) for her crime. She wasn't proclaiming Willie Nelson's innocence. She claimed that she "heard" Willie Nelson's voice during the murder of Jason Cross. That's not justice. That's a crime in its own right. In fact, she should have gotten ''more time'' for giving false evidence and trying to convict an innocent man of murder instead of the "extenuating circumstances" that Stottlemeyer was talking about.

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* UnintentionallyUnsympathetic: In "Mr. Monk and the Red-Headed Stranger," it's revealed that the blind woman Mrs. Mass killed Jason "Sonny" Cross and falsely implicated Willie Nelson for the crime. It's also established that her motive was getting even with Sonny because he killed her parents in a DUI crash in the 1980s and got a light sentence for it. Where the trope comes into play is that to some, Mrs. Mass's actions were worse than anything Sonny Cross did. It is clear that Cross's actions were stupid, irresponsible and criminal, and the outcome of his actions was a tragedy, but he didn't intentionally go out and murder anyone. He wasn't even in his right mind, and we don't know anything about the trial. He may have pleaded guilty or no contest to two counts of vehicular manslaughter. Mrs. Mass, on the other hand, committed premeditated murder and then allowed an innocent man to be blamed (and perhaps even would have allowed him to be convicted) for her crime. She wasn't proclaiming Willie Nelson's innocence. She claimed that she "heard" Willie Nelson's voice during the murder of Jason Cross. That's not justice. That's a crime in its own right. In fact, she should have gotten ''more time'' for giving false evidence and trying to convict an innocent man of murder instead of the "extenuating circumstances" that Stottlemeyer was talking about. However, this is arguably mitigated by the heavy implication that Cross didn't regret his actions one bit (especially since he was also a career embezzler), not to mention that the only "leniency" she requests is simply to serve her sentence in a private, windowed cell (though trying to frame Nelson was still a jerk move).
13th Jan '17 12:31:02 PM Scarlatti75
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* HarsherInHindsight: "Mr. Monk and the Man Who Shot Santa" has Monk get attacked by a guy in a Santa suit on a roof. The guy tries to charge at Monk with a metal pipe, and Monk has his hands on the Santa's revolver. Faced with a possibility of bodily harm, Monk does as he's trained to do so and shoots Kenworthy, wounding him. However, there are no eyewitnesses, just earwitnesses who heard the shots. Subsequently, a reporter takes the story of the criminal (that it was deliberate) and runs with it, spinning it to glorify the victim and demonize Monk, who has to spend most of the episode trying to both clear his reputation as a cop while trying to solve the case. This story can be hard to watch after the August 9, 2014 shooting of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri: Brown was shot and killed by a police officer when he resisted arrest, and although forensic evidence supported the cop's story that Brown attacked him, the media ran with the accounts of some secondhand witnesses and spun the story to glorify Brown and make the officer who shot him look like the bad guy.
** Speaking of which, the circumstances of this justified shooting: Monk shoots and wounds Michael Kenworthy when Kenworthy charges him with a piece of pipe. Might look eerily familiar after June 14, 2015, when [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-iVNcpFzBR8 a Louisville, Kentucky police officer shot and killed a man who tried to attack him with a flagpole]].

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* HarsherInHindsight: "Mr. Monk and the Man Who Shot Santa" has Monk get attacked by a guy in a Santa suit on a roof. The guy tries to charge at Monk with a metal pipe, and Monk has his hands on the Santa's revolver. Faced with a possibility of bodily harm, Monk does as he's trained to do so and shoots Kenworthy, wounding him. However, there are no eyewitnesses, just earwitnesses who heard the shots. Subsequently, a reporter takes the story of the criminal (that it was deliberate) and runs with it, spinning it to glorify the victim and demonize Monk, who has to spend most of the episode trying to both clear his reputation as a cop while trying to solve the case. This story can be hard to watch after the August 9, 2014 shooting of Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri: Brown was shot and killed by a police officer when he resisted arrest, and although forensic evidence supported the cop's story that Brown attacked him, the media ran with the accounts of some secondhand witnesses and spun the story to glorify Brown and make the officer who shot him look like the bad guy.
** Speaking of which, the circumstances of this justified shooting: Monk shoots and wounds Michael Kenworthy when Kenworthy charges him with a piece of pipe. Might look eerily familiar after June 14, 2015, when [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-iVNcpFzBR8 a Louisville, Kentucky police officer shot and killed a man who tried to attack him with a flagpole]].
29th Oct '16 7:06:33 PM dmcreif
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* UnintentionallyUnsympathetic: In "Mr. Monk and the Red-Headed Stranger," it's revealed that the blind woman Mrs. Mass killed Jason "Sonny" Cross and falsely implicated Willie Nelson for the crime. It's also established that her motive was getting even with Sonny because he killed her parents in a DUI crash in the 1980s and got a light sentence for it. Where the trope comes into play is that to some, Mrs. Mass's actions were worse than anything Sonny Cross did. It is clear that Cross's actions were stupid, irresponsible and criminal, and the outcome of his actions was a tragedy, but he didn't intentionally go out and murder anyone. He wasn't even in his right mind, and we don't know anything about the trial. He may have pleaded guilty or no contest to two counts of vehicular manslaughter. Mrs. Mass, on the other hand, committed premeditated murder and then allowed an innocent man to be blamed (and perhaps even would have allowed him to be convicted) for her crime. She wasn't proclaiming Willie Nelson's innocence. She claimed that she HEARD Willie Nelson's voice during the murder of Jason Cross. That's not justice. That's a crime in its own right. In fact, she should have gotten MORE TIME for giving false evidence and trying to convict an innocent man of murder instead of the "extenuating circumstances" that the Captain was talking about.

to:

* UnintentionallyUnsympathetic: In "Mr. Monk and the Red-Headed Stranger," it's revealed that the blind woman Mrs. Mass killed Jason "Sonny" Cross and falsely implicated Willie Nelson for the crime. It's also established that her motive was getting even with Sonny because he killed her parents in a DUI crash in the 1980s and got a light sentence for it. Where the trope comes into play is that to some, Mrs. Mass's actions were worse than anything Sonny Cross did. It is clear that Cross's actions were stupid, irresponsible and criminal, and the outcome of his actions was a tragedy, but he didn't intentionally go out and murder anyone. He wasn't even in his right mind, and we don't know anything about the trial. He may have pleaded guilty or no contest to two counts of vehicular manslaughter. Mrs. Mass, on the other hand, committed premeditated murder and then allowed an innocent man to be blamed (and perhaps even would have allowed him to be convicted) for her crime. She wasn't proclaiming Willie Nelson's innocence. She claimed that she HEARD "heard" Willie Nelson's voice during the murder of Jason Cross. That's not justice. That's a crime in its own right. In fact, she should have gotten MORE TIME ''more time'' for giving false evidence and trying to convict an innocent man of murder instead of the "extenuating circumstances" that the Captain Stottlemeyer was talking about.
29th Oct '16 6:40:11 PM dmcreif
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* WhatAnIdiot: In ''Mr. Monk Is On Board'', Natalie goes to a support group for struggling businesses, and one of them is the owner o a site called [=AmishMingle.com=]. In short: someone had actually created an Internet dating service for the world’s Amish population, a religious sect that doesn’t even use electricity, much less Wi-Fi.

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* WhatAnIdiot: In ''Mr. Monk Is On Board'', Natalie goes to a support group for struggling businesses, and one of them is the owner o a site called [=AmishMingle.com=]. In short: someone Someone had actually created an Internet dating service for the world’s Amish population, a religious sect that doesn’t even use electricity, much less Wi-Fi. Wi-Fi.
* UnintentionallyUnsympathetic: In "Mr. Monk and the Red-Headed Stranger," it's revealed that the blind woman Mrs. Mass killed Jason "Sonny" Cross and falsely implicated Willie Nelson for the crime. It's also established that her motive was getting even with Sonny because he killed her parents in a DUI crash in the 1980s and got a light sentence for it. Where the trope comes into play is that to some, Mrs. Mass's actions were worse than anything Sonny Cross did. It is clear that Cross's actions were stupid, irresponsible and criminal, and the outcome of his actions was a tragedy, but he didn't intentionally go out and murder anyone. He wasn't even in his right mind, and we don't know anything about the trial. He may have pleaded guilty or no contest to two counts of vehicular manslaughter. Mrs. Mass, on the other hand, committed premeditated murder and then allowed an innocent man to be blamed (and perhaps even would have allowed him to be convicted) for her crime. She wasn't proclaiming Willie Nelson's innocence. She claimed that she HEARD Willie Nelson's voice during the murder of Jason Cross. That's not justice. That's a crime in its own right. In fact, she should have gotten MORE TIME for giving false evidence and trying to convict an innocent man of murder instead of the "extenuating circumstances" that the Captain was talking about.



** Could be justified. If they "did" explain, people might react to Monk the way they often do to other, more visible, disabilities, such as treating Monk as if he is an anomaly or is helpless. Or maybe it's just because his particular manifestation of OCD would take too long to explain.

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** Could be justified. If they "did" did explain, people might react to Monk the way they often do to other, more visible, disabilities, such as treating Monk as if he is an anomaly or is helpless. Or maybe it's just because his particular manifestation of OCD would take too long to explain.
10th Jan '16 3:53:48 AM ApeAccount
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* HollywoodHomely: When discussing the possibility that the younger man who married Randy's mother could really love her Randy pulls out a picture and the other characters' reactions imply that she must be hideous (Randy even suggests he loves his mother but doesn't know how anyone else could). When the character later turns up (in the same episode, so this is not a case of a retcon) she looks like a perfectly normal woman.
6th Dec '15 12:58:24 AM rafi
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* TheScrappy: Karen, Stottlemeyer's first wife. She is one of the worst variety of the type of liberal thinker who is almost a caricature of the majority of this set of people. She is constantly harping on Leland that he needs to be more open-minded and tolerant of other things while never budging one bit from her own position and showing almost zero respect for Leland and simply assuming that her way is the right way.
2nd Nov '15 11:49:06 PM Eagal
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* FamilyUnfriendlyAesop: In the subplot for the episode "Mr. Monk Is Stuck In Traffic," Monk reports a trucker for driving crazily on the road, it wasn't the first time the trucker in question did so, and they fired her. She then, during the traffic jam, decides she wants to kill Monk as revenge for getting her fired (and her brandishing a crowbar implies that she is not bluffing), and in order for Monk to evade a potential beating on his part when found by her, he is forced by her to withdraw the complaint by claiming he lied about her speeding as revenge for her turning him down in the hand of marriage. Basically, the moral is that, unless you want to be beaten down and possibly killed by the person you reported, don't squeal, even if the person being squealed on deserved the punishment.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=YMMV.Monk