History YMMV / MisterRogersNeighborhood

13th Oct '17 8:39:08 AM stuthehistoryguy
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** [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=29lmR_357rA Fox & Friends]] also jumped on the same bandwagon.

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** [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=29lmR_357rA Fox & Friends]] also [[EvilCannotComprehendGood jumped on the same bandwagon.bandwagon]].
31st Aug '17 2:12:41 PM Rebochan
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Added DiffLines:

** Francois Clemmons was the first African-American regular on a children's program, and Rogers intended to make sure of it. An early appearance featured Mr. Rogers cooling his feet in a wading pool and inviting Officer Clemmons to join him. The camera then pans right in to show two pairs of feet side by side, sharing the same space as equals. The actor Francois Clemmons was incredibly moved by this for years, understanding the significance of it in 1969. It would so move him that in his final appearance on the show, the scene was recreated one more time and this time Rogers performed the symbolic act of drying Clemmons' feet with a towel.
31st Aug '17 1:41:05 PM Rebochan
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Added DiffLines:

** One of Audrey Duck's earliest appearances involves her teaching King Friday how to order a TV and introducing the power of television to the Neighborhood of Make-Believe (including the toddler Prince Tuesday.) This becomes hilarious in that sometime after her appearances on Mr. Rogers, Susan Linn, Audrey's puppeteer, would take a much more critical approach to television and screens in childhood development and even founded the Campaign for a Commercial-Free Childhood to campaign against it. She still performs with Audrey Duck to promote her anti-consumer activism. Not that she's upset with the show that gave her her big break - the organization also hands out a Fred Rogers Integrity Award every year to people that work against consumerism and ''Mister Rogers Neighborhood'' notably features little to no tie-in merchandising and does not include advertisements or product placements (even in it's "how things are made" videos).
11th Aug '17 12:17:28 PM MarioandSmurfs
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** Also, the appearance of the red brick house (added from 1974-onwards, not counting the prototype version used from 1972-73) that appears at the beginning of the intro sequence, as well as the end of the credits, can be a bit unsettling.

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** Also, the appearance of the red brick house brick-red building (added from 1974-onwards, not counting the prototype version used from 1972-73) that appears in the model neighborhood at the beginning and end of the intro sequence, as well as show, can be a bit unsettling, especially during the end of the credits, can be credits when it's zoomed in very close. (The zooming was thankfully toned down beginning in 1980, though it still occured in some episodes until 1988.)
** Even the NET building that appears during the credits of 1968-70 episodes, is also pretty unsettling, even when it says on camera for
a bit unsettling.few seconds after the credits fade out.
11th Aug '17 12:09:43 PM MarioandSmurfs
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** Lady Elaine. Enough said.

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** Lady Elaine. Enough said.Elaine and her red nose.


Added DiffLines:

** Also, the appearance of the red brick house (added from 1974-onwards, not counting the prototype version used from 1972-73) that appears at the beginning of the intro sequence, as well as the end of the credits, can be a bit unsettling.
7th Aug '17 9:39:16 PM legoking831
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* ArchivePanic: There are a total of ''1,005'' episodes through the show's entire run, counting both the black-and-white 100 originals that were on EEN and the 905 that were on NET/PBS. At 30 minutes a piece, that would run 502.5 hours total, or nearly 21 days nonstop. Of course the show is contained per week and isn't meant to be watched over a long term (each episode spans a 5-episode arc to make up for the week). But still, if we want to be completely real here, there's probably no way you're going to make it through all of this. And that's not even counting if you're also considering watching the holiday specials, the parent discussion episodes, or the CBC ones!

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* ArchivePanic: There are a total of ''1,005'' ''995'' episodes through the show's entire run, counting both the black-and-white 100 originals that were on EEN and the 905 895 that were on NET/PBS. At 30 minutes a piece, that would run 502.5 hours total, or nearly 21 days nonstop. Of course the show is contained per week and isn't meant to be watched over a long term (each episode spans a 5-episode arc to make up for the week). But still, if we want to be completely real here, there's probably no way you're going to make it through all of this. And that's not even counting if you're also considering watching the holiday specials, the parent discussion episodes, or the CBC ones!
11th Jul '17 12:44:08 PM BuddyBoy600alt
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** On some episodes, instead, we see the porch and Fred Rogers walking into the house.

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** On some episodes, instead, we episodes of Seasons 10-12 We see the porch and Fred Rogers walking into the house.house instead of the flashing yellow lights.
2nd Jul '17 12:12:24 PM nombretomado
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* CommonKnowledge: It's often believed that the [[BannedEpisode long-pulled from the air]] Conflict episodes were meant to help children deal with the graphic nature of the TV film ''Film/TheDayAfter'', and the reason it was dropped was because it was no longer relevant. However, as mentioned on TheOtherWiki, the original airdates of the two don't coincide with this idea; the first Conflict episode premiered November 7, 1983, where the movie aired November 20; due to the length of time required for making a typical episode, the chances of this being the case are incredibly small. According to the info conveyed during the Twitch stream, it was Fred Rogers himself that requested that the episodes were never ever shown again.

to:

* CommonKnowledge: It's often believed that the [[BannedEpisode long-pulled from the air]] Conflict episodes were meant to help children deal with the graphic nature of the TV film ''Film/TheDayAfter'', and the reason it was dropped was because it was no longer relevant. However, as mentioned on TheOtherWiki, Wiki/TheOtherWiki, the original airdates of the two don't coincide with this idea; the first Conflict episode premiered November 7, 1983, where the movie aired November 20; due to the length of time required for making a typical episode, the chances of this being the case are incredibly small. According to the info conveyed during the Twitch stream, it was Fred Rogers himself that requested that the episodes were never ever shown again.
28th Jun '17 10:21:24 PM RAMChYLD
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* ArchivePanic: There are a total of ''1,005'' episodes through the show's entire run, counting both the black-and-white 100 originals that were on EEN and the 905 that were on NET/PBS. At 30 minutes a piece, that would run 502.5 hours total, or nearly 21 days nonstop. Of course the show is contained per week and isn't meant to be watched over a long term (the episode itself is self-contained sharing only a common theme, but the Land of Make Believe segment spans a 5-episode arc to make up for the week). But still, if we want to be completely real here, there's probably no way you're going to make it through all of this. And that's not even counting if you're also considering watching the holiday specials, the parent discussion episodes, or the CBC ones!

to:

* ArchivePanic: There are a total of ''1,005'' episodes through the show's entire run, counting both the black-and-white 100 originals that were on EEN and the 905 that were on NET/PBS. At 30 minutes a piece, that would run 502.5 hours total, or nearly 21 days nonstop. Of course the show is contained per week and isn't meant to be watched over a long term (the (each episode itself is self-contained sharing only a common theme, but the Land of Make Believe segment spans a 5-episode arc to make up for the week). But still, if we want to be completely real here, there's probably no way you're going to make it through all of this. And that's not even counting if you're also considering watching the holiday specials, the parent discussion episodes, or the CBC ones!
28th Jun '17 10:20:34 PM RAMChYLD
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* ArchivePanic: There are a total of ''1,005'' episodes through the show's entire run, counting both the black-and-white 100 originals that were on EEN and the 905 that were on NET/PBS. At 30 minutes a piece, that would run 502.5 hours total, or nearly 21 days nonstop. Of course the show is contained per week and isn't meant to be watched over a long term (an episode arc of 5 episodes make up a week of the same topic). But still, if we want to be completely real here, there's probably no way you're going to make it through all of this. And that's not even counting if you're also considering watching the holiday specials, the parent discussion episodes, or the CBC ones!

to:

* ArchivePanic: There are a total of ''1,005'' episodes through the show's entire run, counting both the black-and-white 100 originals that were on EEN and the 905 that were on NET/PBS. At 30 minutes a piece, that would run 502.5 hours total, or nearly 21 days nonstop. Of course the show is contained per week and isn't meant to be watched over a long term (an (the episode itself is self-contained sharing only a common theme, but the Land of Make Believe segment spans a 5-episode arc of 5 episodes to make up a week of for the same topic).week). But still, if we want to be completely real here, there's probably no way you're going to make it through all of this. And that's not even counting if you're also considering watching the holiday specials, the parent discussion episodes, or the CBC ones!
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=YMMV.MisterRogersNeighborhood