History YMMV / MegaManBattleNetwork

10th Jan '16 10:11:10 PM DrakeClawfang
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it's a bit of a stretch to blame BN 4 for the decline of every other spin-off going on. Capcom Sequel Stagnation was probably as much to blame as anything
* FranchiseKiller: ''Battle Network 4'' had extremely high sales thanks to ''Battle Network 3'' and lots of hype from Anime/MegaManNTWarrior, but its poor reception by critics and fans effectively kicked off the franchise's decline. [=MMBN5=] saw a 33% cut in sales, and they were forced to end the series with 6. The attempt to force a continuation resulted in VideoGame/MegaManStarForce, which lasted only three games. VideoGame/MegaManZero, Battle Network's sister series concluded after four games, and ZX never had a third. Capcom infamously cancelled development for several new Mega Man properties (including Legends 3), and the most recent Mega Man franchise, ''VideoGame/RockmanXover'', was only released on the iOS, and has also begun to close up shop. Nowadays, Capcom uses VideoGame/StreetFighter and VideoGame/MonsterHunter for its flagship series'. This series' example is interesting in that Battle Network had actually ''already concluded''. Battle Network 4 was the start of a PostScriptSeason.
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* FranchiseKiller: ''Battle Network 4'' had extremely high sales thanks to ''Battle Network 3'' and lots of hype from Anime/MegaManNTWarrior, ''Anime/MegaManNTWarrior'', but its poor reception by critics and fans effectively kicked off the franchise's decline. [=MMBN5=] saw a 33% cut in sales, and they were forced to end the series with 6. The attempt to force a continuation resulted in VideoGame/MegaManStarForce, which lasted only three games. VideoGame/MegaManZero, Battle Network's sister series concluded after four games, and ZX never had a third. Capcom infamously cancelled development for several new Mega Man properties (including Legends 3), and the most recent Mega Man franchise, ''VideoGame/RockmanXover'', was only released on the iOS, and has also begun to close up shop. Nowadays, Capcom uses VideoGame/StreetFighter and VideoGame/MonsterHunter for its flagship series'. This series' example is interesting in that Battle Network ''Battle Network'' had actually ''already concluded''. Battle concluded''; ''Battle Network 4 4'' was the start of a PostScriptSeason.
10th Jan '16 8:30:35 PM LDragon2
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* FranchiseKiller: ''Battle Network 4'' had extremely high sales thanks to ''Battle Network 3'' and lots of hype from Anime/MegaManNTWarrior, but its poor reception by critics and fans effectively kicked off the franchise's decline. [=MMBN5=] saw a 33% cut in sales, and they were forced to end the series with 6. The attempt to force a continuation resulted in VideoGame/MegaManStarForce, which lasted only three games. VideoGame/MegaManZero, Battle Network's sister series concluded after four games, and ZX never had a third. Capcom infamously cancelled development for several new Mega Man properties (including Legends 3), and the most recent Mega Man franchise, ''VideoGame/RockmanXover'', was only released on the iOS, and has also begun to close up shop. Nowadays, Capcom uses VideoGame/StreetFighter and VideoGame/StreetFighter for its flagship series'. This series' example is interesting in that Battle Network had actually ''already concluded''. Battle Network 4 was the start of a PostScriptSeason.
to:
* FranchiseKiller: ''Battle Network 4'' had extremely high sales thanks to ''Battle Network 3'' and lots of hype from Anime/MegaManNTWarrior, but its poor reception by critics and fans effectively kicked off the franchise's decline. [=MMBN5=] saw a 33% cut in sales, and they were forced to end the series with 6. The attempt to force a continuation resulted in VideoGame/MegaManStarForce, which lasted only three games. VideoGame/MegaManZero, Battle Network's sister series concluded after four games, and ZX never had a third. Capcom infamously cancelled development for several new Mega Man properties (including Legends 3), and the most recent Mega Man franchise, ''VideoGame/RockmanXover'', was only released on the iOS, and has also begun to close up shop. Nowadays, Capcom uses VideoGame/StreetFighter and VideoGame/StreetFighter VideoGame/MonsterHunter for its flagship series'. This series' example is interesting in that Battle Network had actually ''already concluded''. Battle Network 4 was the start of a PostScriptSeason.
10th Jan '16 8:30:02 PM LDragon2
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* FranchiseKiller: ''Battle Network 4'' had extremely high sales thanks to ''Battle Network 3'' and lots of hype from Anime/MegaManNTWarrior, but its poor reception by critics and fans effectively kicked off the franchise's decline. [=MMBN5=] saw a 33% cut in sales, and they were forced to end the series with 6. The attempt to force a continuation resulted in VideoGame/MegaManStarForce, which lasted only three games. VideoGame/MegaManZero, Battle Network's sister series concluded after four games, and ZX never had a third. Capcom infamously cancelled development for several new Mega Man properties (including Legends 3), and the most recent Mega Man franchise, ''VideoGame/RockmanXover'', was only released on the iOS, and has also begun to close up shop. Nowadays, Capcom uses VideoGame/StreetFighter for its flagship series. This series' example is interesting in that Battle Network had actually ''already concluded''. Battle Network 4 was the start of a PostScriptSeason.
to:
* FranchiseKiller: ''Battle Network 4'' had extremely high sales thanks to ''Battle Network 3'' and lots of hype from Anime/MegaManNTWarrior, but its poor reception by critics and fans effectively kicked off the franchise's decline. [=MMBN5=] saw a 33% cut in sales, and they were forced to end the series with 6. The attempt to force a continuation resulted in VideoGame/MegaManStarForce, which lasted only three games. VideoGame/MegaManZero, Battle Network's sister series concluded after four games, and ZX never had a third. Capcom infamously cancelled development for several new Mega Man properties (including Legends 3), and the most recent Mega Man franchise, ''VideoGame/RockmanXover'', was only released on the iOS, and has also begun to close up shop. Nowadays, Capcom uses VideoGame/StreetFighter and VideoGame/StreetFighter for its flagship series.series'. This series' example is interesting in that Battle Network had actually ''already concluded''. Battle Network 4 was the start of a PostScriptSeason.
3rd Jan '16 4:15:20 PM Tavernier
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* MemeticMutation: "[[EarlyInstallmentWeirdness You want summa]] [[GettingCrapPastTheRadar DIS whiskey?]]"
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* MemeticMutation: MemeticMutation: ** "[[EarlyInstallmentWeirdness You want summa]] [[GettingCrapPastTheRadar DIS whiskey?]]"whiskey?]]" ** Duo's Anger Impact has become the symbol for how much everyone hates ''Battle Network 4''.
30th Dec '15 5:12:12 PM Tavernier
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* AmericansHateTingle: [=BubbleMan=].exe. Being an annoying {{Gonk}} (though others find him UglyCute) and ThatOneBoss surely does that.
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* AmericansHateTingle: [=BubbleMan=].exe. Being an annoying {{Gonk}} (though others find him UglyCute) exe, the GoddamnedBoss at the end of a long, repetitive slog through the maze called the Cyberworld, a FetchQuest, and ThatOneBoss surely does that.a ScrappyMechanic.
9th Nov '15 8:28:55 PM DrakeClawfang
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Added DiffLines:
** Chaos Unisons in ''5'' are special one-turn Soul Unisons that turn your charge shots into ''Dark Chips'', but with no drawback unless you overcharge the shop (causing Mega Man DS to appear as an enemy and put the hurt on you). Special mention to Dark Circle, the Searchman Chaos Unison. Dark Circle hits seven panels around the edge of the enemy area, but if you use Area Grab chips to reduce the enemy area, the cursors will overlap and deal multiple hits. With two Area Grabs and good timing, a single Dark Circle charge shot can deal 900 total damage. Provided you can learn to charge the shot right, you can then do this again and again and again.
9th Nov '15 8:10:01 PM MayIncon
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** ''Battle Network 4'' is filled with these. Although you could blame how the scenario system works as to why nobody ever seems to comment on most of the stuff, it doesn't change the fact that there was some seriously weird stuff going on. *** This is because, to save on programming, characters ignore events unless they are directly affected (i.e. it occurs in their immediate location).
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** ''Battle Network 4'' is filled with these. Although you could blame how the scenario system works as to why nobody ever seems to comment on most of the stuff, it doesn't change the fact that there was some seriously weird stuff going on. *** This on.[[labelnote: Explanation]]This is because, to save on programming, characters ignore events unless they are directly affected (i.e. it occurs in their immediate location).[[/labelnote]]

** Some fan works portray Raika and Chaud as being much tougher on Lan than in the canon to the point of bullying him. [[NeverLiveItDown Mind you, Raika introduced himself in Red Sun by punching Lan in the stomach]] while Chaud showed very little respect towards Lan in the first game. ** Also the infamous link between Lan and Mega Man. In canon the details are quite vague, outside "if one dies, they both die". In some fan works it can work as anything from telepathic communication to feeling each other's senses to even merging their bodies.
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** Some fan works portray Raika and Chaud as being much tougher on Lan than in the canon to the point of bullying him.him [[DracoInLeatherPants while at the same time depicting them as oversympathetic characters]]. [[NeverLiveItDown Mind you, Raika introduced himself in Red Sun by punching Lan in the stomach]] while Chaud showed very little respect towards Lan in the first game. ** Also the infamous link between Lan and Mega Man.[=MegaMan=]. In canon the details are quite vague, outside "if one dies, they both die". In some fan works it can work as anything from telepathic communication to feeling each other's senses to even merging their bodies.

** Many of the bosses from Battle Network 2 have gimmicky and obnoxious attack patterns that are less interested in being challenging and more interested in being completely unfair, usually through some combination of SpamAttack and SuperSpeed.
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** Many of the bosses from Battle Network 2 have gimmicky and obnoxious attack patterns that are less interested in being challenging and more interested in being completely unfair, usually through some combination of SpamAttack SpamAttack, SuperSpeed and SuperSpeed.being only vulnerable when they're about to attack[[labelnote:*]]which they rarely do, making it frustrating if you want to obtain their V2/V3 chips by beating them under a strict time limit[[/labelnote]].

** An actual coding mess-up happens in the [=ProtoMan=] tournament fight at Blue Moon. His AI insists on doing almost nothing but spamming Fighter Sword, but only from the center-right row. An Area Steal makes him entirely useless in combat.
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** An actual coding mess-up happens in the [=ProtoMan=] tournament fight at Blue Moon. His AI insists on doing almost nothing but spamming Fighter Sword, but only from the center-right row. An Area Steal Grab makes him entirely useless in combat.

** While Style Changes are not hated, the element is determined by the number of viruses of each element that have been fought, which is incredibly annoying to keep track of, considering how the main game requires you to run through multiple environments while still leveling up the same Style Change. Elec Styles, which have very little raw power, get this the worst. The {{nerf}}s to the Megabuster since the third game don't help matters, since Elec Style is supposed to be the speedy style with an emphasis on continuously stun-locking enemies-which is possible with power-ups but not with the more-limiting Customizer.
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** While Style Changes are not hated, the element is determined by the number of viruses of each element that have been fought, which is incredibly annoying to keep track of, considering how the main game requires you to run through multiple environments while still leveling up the same Style Change. Elec Styles, which have very little raw power, get this hated the worst. most. The {{nerf}}s to the Megabuster since the third game don't help matters, plays a huge factor, since Elec Style is supposed to be the speedy style with an emphasis on continuously stun-locking enemies-which is possible with power-ups but not with the more-limiting Customizer.

** Regarding Navi fights, Bubble Man and Dark Man's beta forms will only show up if Mega Man's health is low and if there is a bug in the navi cust respectively.
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** Regarding Navi fights, Bubble Man [=BubbleMan=] and Dark Man's [=DarkMan=]'s beta forms will only show up if Mega Man's health is low and if there is a bug in the navi cust respectively.

* {{Sequelitis}}: The fourth, fifth, and sixth games. The third game rather coherently ended the Dr. Wily plotline, the Bass plotline, and ended with [[spoiler:[=MegaMan=]'s HeroicSacrifice]]. Following that the series had a [[ArtEvolution major graphical shift]], Style Changes were replaced with Soul Unisons (among numerous other gameplay changes), and Dr. Wily and Bass are somehow still alive. The plots also got quite ''weird'', with the fifth game arguably taking the cake--the BigBad's plan is to link the literal ''[[OurSoulsAreDifferent souls]]'' of everyone on earth via the Internet.
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* {{Sequelitis}}: The fourth, fifth, and sixth games.second half of the series, especially the fourth game. The third game rather coherently ended the Dr. Wily plotline, the Bass plotline, and ended with [[spoiler:[=MegaMan=]'s HeroicSacrifice]]. Following that the series had a [[ArtEvolution major graphical shift]], Style Changes were replaced with Soul Unisons (among numerous other gameplay changes), and Dr. Wily and Bass are somehow still alive. The plots also got quite ''weird'', with the fifth game arguably taking the cake--the BigBad's plan is to link the literal ''[[OurSoulsAreDifferent souls]]'' of everyone on earth via the Internet.

** [=SkullMan=] in the GaidenGame Battle Chip Challenge has a great deal of health, a powerful attack, and has a scarily well-built program deck. His power chip is the Curse Shield, which not only shields him, but has an absurd amount of HP in its own right and it will eat your attacks for breakfast (and every time you hit it, it'll take a bite out of ''you'', too). To add some nasty icing to this awful cake, [=SkullMan=] is often found on a ''poison stage'', which will eat through your health and chips while you struggle to land each attack, hit by individual hit.
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** [=SkullMan=] in the GaidenGame Battle Chip Challenge has a great deal of health, a powerful attack, and has a scarily well-built program deck. His power chip is the Curse Shield, which not only shields him, but has an absurd amount of HP in its own right and it will eat your attacks for breakfast (and every time you hit it, it'll take a bite out of ''you'', too). To add some nasty icing to this awful cake, [=SkullMan=] is often found on a ''poison stage'', which will eat through your health and chips while you struggle to land each attack, hit by individual hit.

* TheyJustDidntCare: The most common theory held by fans as to ''Operate Shooting Star'''s lack of new content and badly-drawn new mugshots. ''Battle Network 4'' is so sloppily put together and implemented that most people believe this of it, too.
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* TheyJustDidntCare: The most common theory held by fans as to ''Operate Shooting Star'''s lack of new content and [[OffModel badly-drawn new mugshots.mugshots]]. ''Battle Network 4'' is so sloppily put together and implemented that most people believe this of it, too.

** A few members of Gospel, actually. Namely Princess Pride and Dave (the former was at least upgraded to being part of the main cast in ''5'').
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** A few members of Gospel, actually. Namely Princess Pride and Dave (the ([[HeelFaceTurn the former was at least upgraded to being part of the main cast cast]] in ''5'').

** In the fifth and the sixth game there is a random fat {{NPC}} that stood out among others (there's usually only one or two of the kind) and can pass off as either a guy or a girl. His/her pink shirt, hair curls and lipstick-like mouth doesn't help either. It was eventually revealed from some dialogues that the fat [=NPC=] is actually a guy. * VillainDecay: [=ShadeMan=]. After being gunned down by a Pile Driver thanks to [[VideoGame/{{Boktai}} Django]], he went down from being an InvincibleVillain that can only be damaged by Dark Chips to a rather easy boss, also demoted to the second Darkloid you face in ''5'' instead of just below [=LaserMan=] in the Nebula ranks. His chip code was changed from X to S in the fifth game (Do note that the chip code X is usually exclusive to ''[[SNKBoss Bass]]'' and other chips related to him).
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** In the fifth and the sixth game there is a random fat {{NPC}} that stood out among others (there's usually only one or two of the kind) and can pass off as either a guy or a girl. His/her girl mostly caused by said [=NPC=]'s pink shirt, hair curls and lipstick-like mouth doesn't help either.mouth. It was eventually revealed from some dialogues that the fat [=NPC=] is actually a guy. * VillainDecay: [=ShadeMan=]. After being gunned down by a Pile Driver in a postgame sidequest thanks to [[VideoGame/{{Boktai}} Django]], he went down from being an InvincibleVillain that can only be damaged by Dark Chips to a rather easy boss, also demoted to the second Darkloid you face in ''5'' instead of just below [=LaserMan=] in the Nebula ranks. His chip code was changed from X to S in the fifth game (Do note that the chip code X is usually exclusive to ''[[SNKBoss Bass]]'' and other chips related to him).
3rd Nov '15 8:53:51 PM reppuzan
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Added DiffLines:
* FunnyAneurysmMoment: In the early 2000s, the idea of cyber crime wreaking havoc on a global scale seemed pretty far fetched. Then came wave after wave of hackers breaking into company databases to steal money, identity information, and expose top-secret and scandalous information and suddenly Battle Network's antagonists doesn't as unbelievable as before.
1st Nov '15 11:08:47 PM JackTheHammer
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** One of the series recurring themes? Cyberterrorism. While [[OlderThanTheyThink not invented by this particular series]], this series demonstrates objects being hacked by terrorists and putting people in danger, government databases being hacked by terrorists, remote-controlled weapons going haywire, and crimes being ordered across the world with only the push of a button. In the 2000s, such a concept was still being thought of as fantastical, but in the new tens, people take it much more seriously.
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** One of the series recurring themes? Cyberterrorism. themes is cyberterrorism. While [[OlderThanTheyThink not invented by this particular series]], this series ''Battle Network'' demonstrates objects being hacked by terrorists and putting people in danger, government databases being hacked by terrorists, remote-controlled weapons going haywire, and crimes being ordered across the world with only the push of a button. In the 2000s, such a concept was still being thought of as fantastical, but fantastical. In TheNewTens, technology and the Internet have developed to such an extent that many of the attacks depicted in ''Battle Network'' became reality (corporate & government databases now get hacked on a large scale at an almost annual basis), and cyberterrorism and cyberwarfare are constantly discussed in the new tens, people take it much more seriously. media and by national security strategists.
27th Oct '15 11:35:19 PM Tavernier
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Cleaning Up the Page
* DemonicSpiders: Late game viruses tend to involve filling your Navi's half of the arena with area-consuming attacks and harmful panel types, which are meant to throw you into the paths of ''other'' virus attacks. ** ''Battle Network 3'' has the Scuttlest viruses in the Secret Area (they also appear in the WWW Area in the second game). They start combat with a BattleAura that requires a single hit dealing 100 (or 200, for the stronger ones) damage or more to take down, come in groups of three, and have homing attacks that deal 200 damage apiece. To make things worse, you ''will'' encounter one that can hit the [[ElementalRockPaperScissors elemental weakness]] of the style you are currently using, and they come in groups of 2-3. What sets them apart in the third game are the random holy panels dotting both fields, doubling their defensive abilities if you're unlucky. ** Cloudies spring into the air and spit out a cloud that zooms to Mega's current spot and floats up and down, barring Mega from that column. When combined with Swordys, they are the stuff of nightmares, as Swordies movie incredibly fast and have long-ranged swords swipes (and in the first game, ''fighter-range'', too). If a Cloudy cuts off access to Mega's back column, he'll be caught almost permanently in range of Swordy attacks. ** Swordies get [[{{Nerf}} kicked a fair bit down the totem pole]] in later games (though they're still not to be taken lightly). Also, in ''4'', the [=UnderNet=] is infested with ''actual spiders'' that invade your area, not only forcing you to dance around (you have a [[AwesomeButImpractical Slasher]], right?) and put you in the line of fire of everything else, but also covering your section with sticky webs that will catch and hold you for a few seconds, which will spell death in the worst sections. ** Dominerds can be this when accompained by other viruses, especially in Battle Network 5's liberation missions, where you have to fight a time limit to clear the enemies. Some high-level Dominerds pack Geddon-chips, which will crack all field panels. They won't suffer from this. You will. ** 4 has ''Demonic Bosses''. Once you find the V2 ghost of a boss you've faced during the game, he becomes a random encounter in the area you found his ghost in... at the ''Omega'' level (that's ''V4'' for those of you keeping score at home -- they skip V3 entirely). This leads to ridiculous potential encounters, such as [=GutsMan=] Omega during a player's first ever run-through of the Den Tournament, which would be a nightmare for new players. ** Puffballs and their palette-swapped upgrades ''Goofballs'' are masked Wood viruses that slowly approach Mega's boundary. When they reach the edge of their field, they hold their masks out one panel and flood all adjacent panels with poison gas. On top of that, they can use Panel Grab to slowly encroach further into Mega's territory. If you think that you can hang back out of reach and just shoot at them from afar, be warned: those masks double as shields that will render most projectiles useless. ** Shadow viruses are almost literally demonic (their upgrades are the Red Devil and Blue Demon). These things float idly around their territory for a few moments, glaring, and then suddenly they fly to a panel adjacent to Mega, completely ignoring boundary restrictions. While that may only sound mildly annoying, what makes them truly fearsome is the fact that they're NighInvulnerable. They're immune to all damage except for sword-based attacks, having their own special variety of defense. Later game virus-gauntlets love to stuff these guys in to create chokepoints for players not using swords. ** Their successors are the Navi Blacks and Shadows (Shadow-variants of Normal and Heel Navis from the fourth game), which appear in Black Earth -- basically, it's a dungeon filled with mini-bosses that are immune to almost all damage. Also, the Nightmare viruses from the sixth game behave very similarly to the original Shadows, though they occupy panels in addition to their attacks, reducing Mega's dodging options.[[note]]Trivia: The shadow-type viruses are succeeded by the Black Hole viruses in the Star Force series, which have no real connection to swords or bladed weapons (though they retain this weakness) and instead alternate between draining HP and firing projectiles.[[/note]] ** Megalian ([[SuddenNameChange or Heady in 6]]). These are ''the'' classic Battle Network demonic spider, viruses that are cloaked ''in auras'' and warp around their field a few times before launching their heads at Mega to bludgeon him with. Higher levels of Megalians have tougher auras and farther reach. ** Protectos in the second game and Numbers in the third are defensive puzzle-viruses in the BonusDungeon of each game that will ''punish'' you if you fail to solve them properly (hitting the wrong Number even with the Mega Buster will result in that Number using ''ERR+DEL'', which strikes Mega with a lightning bolt that deals ''[[OneHitKill 1000 Elec damage]]''). Protectos even have you ''on a timer'' -- you must destroy them before they hit 0 or catch a massive explosion with your face. ** Fishy2s are this, specifically for the fire-traps they leave in your area after they zoom past that eat up one of your rows for a few seconds. You could make an argument for Fishy3s (which are essentially hyper-Fishies), but they usually show up with other Fishy viruses, and multiple Fishy viruses tend to actually negate one another's effectiveness by serving as obstacles that their fellows can't pass through, and a Fishy that can't fly is a pointless Fishy. On the other hand, you can get seriously unlucky and they will all safely launch, and woe unto you if you fight Fishy2s on a Grass Stage. ** The [[BreadEggsBreadedEggs Null, Void, and Null&Void]] viruses in the second game, each with a respectable amount of HP, regenerative abilities, and the ability to summon a pair of whirlpool-traps that take 200-HP bites out of Mega's health. ** Lavagons will have a homing fire-breath attack that will leave a burning firetrap on the panels it hits. Their upgrades (the Bluegon and Yellowgon) will use similar attacks (ice-breath and lightning strikes, both homing), and these last two only appear during the SS and SSS license tests. The Yellowgon is accompanied by a pair of Hard Head 3s that will punch holes in your field, further harassing you and threatening to get you boxed in. ** In the sixth game, there's the Mech virus family. They're main gimmick is to release a thunder-ball type attack into your field like the Billy viruses, but if it hits you, it'll immediately take a 100-health ''bite'' out of Mega with its swords. If you think it'll be easy to dodge the ball-lightning, think again, because they usually appear (especially in the Graveyard) with Element-Dragons (whose attacks take up two columns at a time) and Fighter-planes (who pepper your entire area with bullets).
to:
* DemonicSpiders: Late game viruses tend to involve filling your Navi's half of the arena with area-consuming attacks and harmful panel types, which are meant to throw you into the paths of ''other'' virus attacks. ** ''Battle Network 3'' has the Scuttlest viruses in the Secret Area (they also appear in the WWW Area in the second game). They start combat with a BattleAura that requires a single hit dealing 100 (or 200, for the stronger ones) damage or more to take down, come in groups of three, and have homing attacks that deal 200 damage apiece. To make things worse, you ''will'' encounter one that can hit the [[ElementalRockPaperScissors elemental weakness]] of the style you attacks. Detailed examples are currently using, and they come in groups of 2-3. What sets them apart in the third game are the random holy panels dotting both fields, doubling their defensive abilities if you're unlucky. ** Cloudies spring into the air and spit out a cloud that zooms to Mega's current spot and floats up and down, barring Mega from that column. When combined with Swordys, they are the stuff of nightmares, as Swordies movie incredibly fast and have long-ranged swords swipes (and in the first game, ''fighter-range'', too). If a Cloudy cuts off access to Mega's back column, he'll be caught almost permanently in range of Swordy attacks. ** Swordies get [[{{Nerf}} kicked a fair bit down the totem pole]] in later games (though they're still not to be taken lightly). Also, in ''4'', the [=UnderNet=] is infested with ''actual spiders'' that invade your area, not only forcing you to dance around (you have a [[AwesomeButImpractical Slasher]], right?) and put you in the line of fire of everything else, but also covering your section with sticky webs that will catch and hold you for a few seconds, which will spell death in the worst sections. ** Dominerds can be this when accompained by other viruses, especially in Battle Network 5's liberation missions, where you have to fight a time limit to clear the enemies. Some high-level Dominerds pack Geddon-chips, which will crack all field panels. They won't suffer from this. You will. ** 4 has ''Demonic Bosses''. Once you find the V2 ghost of a boss you've faced during the game, he becomes a random encounter in the area you found his ghost in... at the ''Omega'' level (that's ''V4'' for those of you keeping score at home -- they skip V3 entirely). This leads to ridiculous potential encounters, such as [=GutsMan=] Omega during a player's first ever run-through of the Den Tournament, which would be a nightmare for new players. ** Puffballs and their palette-swapped upgrades ''Goofballs'' are masked Wood viruses that slowly approach Mega's boundary. When they reach the edge of their field, they hold their masks out one panel and flood all adjacent panels with poison gas. On top of that, they can use Panel Grab to slowly encroach further into Mega's territory. If you think that you can hang back out of reach and just shoot at them from afar, be warned: those masks double as shields that will render most projectiles useless. ** Shadow viruses are almost literally demonic (their upgrades are the Red Devil and Blue Demon). These things float idly around their territory for a few moments, glaring, and then suddenly they fly to a panel adjacent to Mega, completely ignoring boundary restrictions. While that may only sound mildly annoying, what makes them truly fearsome is the fact that they're NighInvulnerable. They're immune to all damage except for sword-based attacks, having their own special variety of defense. Later game virus-gauntlets love to stuff these guys in to create chokepoints for players not using swords. ** Their successors are the Navi Blacks and Shadows (Shadow-variants of Normal and Heel Navis from the fourth game), which appear in Black Earth -- basically, it's a dungeon filled with mini-bosses that are immune to almost all damage. Also, the Nightmare viruses from the sixth game behave very similarly to the original Shadows, though they occupy panels in addition to their attacks, reducing Mega's dodging options.[[note]]Trivia: The shadow-type viruses are succeeded by the Black Hole viruses in the Star Force series, which have no real connection to swords or bladed weapons (though they retain this weakness) and instead alternate between draining HP and firing projectiles.[[/note]] ** Megalian ([[SuddenNameChange or Heady in 6]]). These are ''the'' classic Battle Network demonic spider, viruses that are cloaked ''in auras'' and warp around their field a few times before launching their heads at Mega to bludgeon him with. Higher levels of Megalians have tougher auras and farther reach. ** Protectos in the second game and Numbers in the third are defensive puzzle-viruses in the BonusDungeon of each game that will ''punish'' you if you fail to solve them properly (hitting the wrong Number even with the Mega Buster will result in that Number using ''ERR+DEL'', which strikes Mega with a lightning bolt that deals ''[[OneHitKill 1000 Elec damage]]''). Protectos even have you ''on a timer'' -- you must destroy them before they hit 0 or catch a massive explosion with your face. ** Fishy2s are this, specifically for the fire-traps they leave in your area after they zoom past that eat up one of your rows for a few seconds. You could make an argument for Fishy3s (which are essentially hyper-Fishies), but they usually show up with other Fishy viruses, and multiple Fishy viruses tend to actually negate one another's effectiveness by serving as obstacles that their fellows can't pass through, and a Fishy that can't fly is a pointless Fishy. On the other hand, you can get seriously unlucky and they will all safely launch, and woe unto you if you fight Fishy2s on a Grass Stage. ** The [[BreadEggsBreadedEggs Null, Void, and Null&Void]] viruses in the second game, each with a respectable amount of HP, regenerative abilities, and the ability to summon a pair of whirlpool-traps that take 200-HP bites out of Mega's health. ** Lavagons will have a homing fire-breath attack that will leave a burning firetrap on the panels it hits. Their upgrades (the Bluegon and Yellowgon) will use similar attacks (ice-breath and lightning strikes, both homing), and these last two only appear during the SS and SSS license tests. The Yellowgon is accompanied by a pair of Hard Head 3s that will punch holes in your field, further harassing you and threatening to get you boxed in. ** In the sixth game, there's the Mech virus family. They're main gimmick is to release a thunder-ball type attack into your field like the Billy viruses, but if it hits you, it'll immediately take a 100-health ''bite'' out of Mega with its swords. If you think it'll be easy to dodge the ball-lightning, think again, because they usually appear (especially in the Graveyard) with Element-Dragons (whose attacks take up two columns at a time) and Fighter-planes (who pepper your entire area with bullets).trope page.

* GoddamnedBoss: ** [=ToadMan=] in the second game is made difficult through his incredibly obnoxious attack pattern. You will constantly have to dodge the tadpole torpedoes fired by his lily pads, often dodging the paralyzing song note that Toad will fire at you (which can shift rows to home in on you), and if ToadMan catches you in his row, he'll spring over to his other lily pad, two rows above or below him, requiring you to chase him. ** [=SnakeMan=] (also in the second game) ''loves'' to hide in his pot if anyone ever enters his row, defending himself from damage and wasting everybody's time, and he moves so fast that any non-instantaneous attacks would just be wasted. That he hangs out in the back row behind a column of holes is icing on the cake. ** [=ThunderMan=] (second game [[RunningGag once again]]) has an obnoxious attack pattern. His main threat are the three clouds, which are moving, impassible obstacles that can box you in, and they will also fire paralyzing lightning balls at Mega. His other attacks require Mega to constantly be on the move (lightning balls fired down each row by the clouds and individual lightning strikes), which make it difficult to keep track of the clouds' movement pattern. The clouds themselves can actually crush Mega if they catch him in his back row, but they will do 0 damage and give him MercyInvincibility at the cost of his Busting Level. ** [=QuickMan=] (hey, look, second game!) also counts, primarily because he'll FlashStep all over his field and he enjoys shielding abilities that are hard to anticipate and will eat up your Battle Chips like mad. (Other Navis who employ shielding, like Drill and [=ProtoMan=], are usually saved for the final chapters of the game, while Quick is only the second boss). ** [[DirtyCoward BubbleMan]] from 3. He constantly hides from your attacks behind a rock and a constant stream of bubble traps. Oh, and his V3 random encounter will only appear when you're at critical health. ** [=DarkMan=] in the third game deploys a series of bats through Mega's field that require constant dodging back and forth to avoid damage. These are a distraction from his ElementalRockPaperScissors nightmare -- he has 3 out of 4 elements under his control, and an attack (usually an area-consuming one, like the Killer's Eye ray or the two-row snowflake) will trigger every time you cross his path, which is what the BATS are for. ** [=ShadeMan=] always has some obnoxious damage-mitigating trick in the fourth game. In his first two plotline fights, he [[PlotArmor can't take any damage at all]] without Dark Chips, but special consideration must go to his Omega version random-encounter, after the Boktai sidequest. He ''can'' take damage, but if you hit him ''too hard'', he'll split into four red bats that slowly retreat from the field, three of which are illusory. If you want to beat him quickly, you must figure out which one of the bats is really him and continue to pile on the attacks (and his HP counter disappears during this too)...but it's only ''safe'' to hit him while he's in the lowest row of the field, since you want to protect the Green Mystery Data[[note]]There's a version-specific Giga Chip inside, and the only other way to find it is by picking a fight with [=LaserMan=] Omega[[/note]] in the upper corner of his field (which the [=ShadeMan=]-bat will destroy if he connects with it). ''Have fun''.
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* GoddamnedBoss: ** [=ToadMan=] in GoddamnedBoss: We had too many examples, so they got moved to the second game is made difficult through his incredibly trope page. In summary: ** Many of the bosses from Battle Network 2 have gimmicky and obnoxious attack pattern. You will constantly have to dodge the tadpole torpedoes fired by his lily pads, often dodging the paralyzing song note patterns that Toad will fire at you (which can shift rows to home are less interested in on you), being challenging and if ToadMan catches you more interested in his row, he'll spring over to his other lily pad, two rows above or below him, requiring you to chase him. ** [=SnakeMan=] (also in the second game) ''loves'' to hide in his pot if anyone ever enters his row, defending himself from damage being completely unfair, usually through some combination of SpamAttack and wasting everybody's time, and he moves so fast that any non-instantaneous attacks would just be wasted. That he hangs out in the back row SuperSpeed. ** ''[=BN3's=]'' [=BubbleMan=] hides behind a column of holes is icing on the cake. ** [=ThunderMan=] (second game [[RunningGag once again]]) has an obnoxious attack pattern. His main threat are the three clouds, which are moving, impassible obstacles that can box you in, and they will also fire paralyzing lightning balls at Mega. His other attacks require Mega to constantly be on the move (lightning balls fired down each row by the clouds and individual lightning strikes), which make it difficult to keep track of the clouds' movement pattern. The clouds themselves can actually crush Mega if they catch him in his back row, but they will do 0 damage and give him MercyInvincibility at the cost of his Busting Level. ** [=QuickMan=] (hey, look, second game!) also counts, primarily because he'll FlashStep all over his field and he enjoys shielding abilities that are hard to anticipate and will eat up your Battle Chips like mad. (Other Navis who employ shielding, like Drill and [=ProtoMan=], are usually saved for the final chapters of the game, while Quick is only the second boss). ** [[DirtyCoward BubbleMan]] from 3. He constantly hides from your attacks behind a huge rock and a constant stream of bubble traps. Oh, and his V3 random encounter will only appear when you're at critical health. ** [=DarkMan=] hole in the third game deploys a series of bats through Mega's field that require constant dodging back and forth designed to avoid damage. These are a distraction from his ElementalRockPaperScissors nightmare -- he has 3 out of 4 elements under his control, and SpamAttack for him, making it hard to get an attack (usually an area-consuming one, like the Killer's Eye ray or the two-row snowflake) will trigger every time you cross his path, which is what the BATS are for. opening. ** [=ShadeMan=] [=BN4's=] [=ShadeMan=], who always has some obnoxious damage-mitigating trick in the fourth game. In his first two plotline fights, he [[PlotArmor can't take any damage at all]] without Dark Chips, but special consideration must go to his Omega version random-encounter, after the Boktai sidequest. He ''can'' take damage, but if you hit him ''too hard'', he'll split into four red bats that slowly retreat keep from the field, three of which are illusory. If you want to beat him quickly, you must figure out which one of the bats is really him and continue to pile on the attacks (and his HP counter disappears during this too)...but it's only ''safe'' to hit him while he's in the lowest row of the field, since you want to protect the Green Mystery Data[[note]]There's a version-specific Giga Chip inside, and the only other way to find it is by picking a fight with [=LaserMan=] Omega[[/note]] in the upper corner of his field (which the [=ShadeMan=]-bat will destroy if he connects with it). ''Have fun''.taking damage.
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