History YMMV / MeasureForMeasure

31st Aug '16 1:46:47 AM Ciara25
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** Unless, considering this play was written and performed in Protestant England, the faith that Catholics put in priests and friars is meant to be a big joke, and the audience should laugh along with the Duke as he merrily dupes one schmuck after another.

to:

** *** Unless, considering this play was written and performed in Protestant England, the faith that Catholics put in priests and friars is meant to be a big joke, and the audience should laugh along with the Duke as he merrily dupes one schmuck after another.



** At the time the play was first performed, even though all the nunneries in England had been dissolved decades before in the Reformation, audiences would still understand the importance of Isabella's desire to become a nun and her refusal to give up her virginity in order to save her brother. To modern eyes, though, she can come off as rather cold-blooded and callous.

to:

** At the time the play was first performed, even though all the nunneries in England had been dissolved decades before in the Reformation, Reformation and people had been encouraged to dismiss the traditions of the Catholic Church, audiences would still understand the importance of Isabella's desire to become a nun and her refusal to give up her virginity in order to save her brother. To modern eyes, though, she can come off as rather cold-blooded and callous.
31st Aug '16 1:35:20 AM Ciara25
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** At the time the play was first performed, even though all the nunneries had been dissolved decades before in the Reformation, audiences would still understand the importance of Isabella's desire to become a nun and her refusal to give up her virginity in order to save her brother. To modern eyes, though, she can come off as rather cold-blooded and callous.

to:

** At the time the play was first performed, even though all the nunneries in England had been dissolved decades before in the Reformation, audiences would still understand the importance of Isabella's desire to become a nun and her refusal to give up her virginity in order to save her brother. To modern eyes, though, she can come off as rather cold-blooded and callous.
28th Aug '16 3:34:56 AM Ciara25
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** The Duke's offer of marriage at the end would also be more acceptable to a contemporary audience, since 'comedy' plays usually ended in marriages and the union with the Duke is explicitly Isabella's 'reward'. Modern audiences are often put off by the StrangledByTheRedString problems.

to:

** The Duke's offer of marriage at the end would also be more acceptable to a contemporary audience, since 'comedy' plays usually ended in marriages and the union with the Duke is explicitly Isabella's 'reward'. Modern audiences are often put off by the StrangledByTheRedString problems.problems, to say nothing of the way he's manipulated her throughout the play.
27th Aug '16 7:10:13 AM Ciara25
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* TrueArtIsAngsty: This is one of the darkest of Shakespeare's comedies. But it's also one of his less popular plays. Perhaps that fact averts the trope, ultimately.

to:

* TrueArtIsAngsty: This is one of the darkest of Shakespeare's comedies. But it's also one of his less popular plays. Perhaps that fact averts the trope, ultimately.ultimately.
* ValuesDissonance:
** At the time the play was first performed, even though all the nunneries had been dissolved decades before in the Reformation, audiences would still understand the importance of Isabella's desire to become a nun and her refusal to give up her virginity in order to save her brother. To modern eyes, though, she can come off as rather cold-blooded and callous.
** The Duke's offer of marriage at the end would also be more acceptable to a contemporary audience, since 'comedy' plays usually ended in marriages and the union with the Duke is explicitly Isabella's 'reward'. Modern audiences are often put off by the StrangledByTheRedString problems.
31st May '16 8:27:35 PM Angeldeb82
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* AlternateCharacterInterpretation: Like every other Shakespearean play, there's a lot of ways to read the characters.

to:

* AlternateCharacterInterpretation: AlternativeCharacterInterpretation: Like every other Shakespearean play, there's a lot of ways to read the characters.



** Is Angelo a KnightTemplar who JumpedOffTheSlipperySlope and [[SexIsEvilAndIAmHorny then got horny]], or was he [[StrawHypocrite always an asshole who finally accepted his ugly nature]]?
** Is Isabella a [[ShrinkingViolet shy]] [[SugarAndIcePersonality but sweet]] ChasteHero who learns about chaste love in the end, or the play's ''[[NotSoDifferent other]]'' KnightTemplar who's so obsessed with her [[PuritySue saintly image]] that she'd sacrifice her brother to maintain it?

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** Is Angelo a KnightTemplar who JumpedOffTheSlipperySlope [[JumpingOffTheSlipperySlope Jumped Off the Slippery Slope]] and [[SexIsEvilAndIAmHorny then got horny]], or was he [[StrawHypocrite always an asshole who finally accepted his ugly nature]]?
** Is Isabella a [[ShrinkingViolet shy]] {{sh|rinkingViolet}}y [[SugarAndIcePersonality but sweet]] ChasteHero {{Chaste Hero}}ine who learns about chaste love in the end, or the play's ''[[NotSoDifferent other]]'' KnightTemplar who's so obsessed with her [[PuritySue saintly image]] image that she'd sacrifice her brother to maintain it?



* CrowningMomentOfHeartwarming: Mariana is pleading for her new husband Angelo's life, and asks Isabella to get on her knees before the Duke to help her. Angelo tried to rape Isabella, broke his promise to spare her brother in exchange for sex, and has been Isabella's enemy for the whole play. Increasingly hysterical, Mariana begs Isabella to get on her knees, and none of the bystanders think she will...And then Isabella gets on her knees beside Mariana and begs for Angelo's life despite all he tried to do. A beautiful example of the Christian mercy that as a future nun (maybe), Isabella should be practicing.
** What makes this doubly heartwarming is that she now shows genuine mercy, not the cold, distant mercy she showed her brother earlier.



* EsotericHappyEnding, thanks in large part to StrangledByTheRedString.

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* EsotericHappyEnding, thanks EsotericHappyEnding: Thanks in large part to StrangledByTheRedString. StrangledByTheRedString.
* SugarWiki/HeartwarmingMoments: Mariana is pleading for her new husband Angelo's life, and asks Isabella to get on her knees before the Duke to help her. Angelo tried to rape Isabella, broke his promise to spare her brother in exchange for sex, and has been Isabella's enemy for the whole play. Increasingly hysterical, Mariana begs Isabella to get on her knees, and none of the bystanders think she will...And then Isabella gets on her knees beside Mariana and begs for Angelo's life despite all he tried to do. A beautiful example of the Christian mercy that as a future nun (maybe), Isabella should be practicing.
** What makes this doubly heartwarming is that she now shows genuine mercy, not the cold, distant mercy she showed her brother earlier.
26th Jul '15 11:52:40 PM vifetoile
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Added DiffLines:

** Unless, considering this play was written and performed in Protestant England, the faith that Catholics put in priests and friars is meant to be a big joke, and the audience should laugh along with the Duke as he merrily dupes one schmuck after another.
3rd Dec '14 3:05:21 PM vifetoile
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** Is the Duke a [[GuileHero benign]] ([[BrilliantButLazy but lazy]]) MagnificentBastard, or [[ItAmusedMe is he just doing it for the lulz]]?

to:

** Is the Duke a [[GuileHero benign]] ([[BrilliantButLazy but lazy]]) MagnificentBastard, or [[ItAmusedMe is he just doing it for the lulz]]?lulz]]? Consider that he poses as a friar and consoles men condemned to death (whom he plans to ultimately pardon, of course). In the time the play was written, the eternal damnation of the soul and the right of priests, and priests alone, to grant absolution were taken very, ''very'' seriously. In modern terms, the Duke's deception would be like some unqualified meddler pretending to be a surgeon and performing life-or-death surgery.
21st Jul '14 10:31:59 AM Bense
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* CrowningMomentOfHeartwarming: Mariana is pleading for her husband's life, and asks Isabella to get on her knees before the Duke to help Mariana. Mariana's husband tried to rape Isabella and kill her brother, and has been Isabella's enemy for the whole play. Increasingly hysterical, Mariana begs Isabella to get on her knees, and none of the bystanders think she will...And then Isabella gets on her knees beside Mariana and begs for Angelo's life despite all he tried to do. A beautiful example of the Christian mercy that as a future nun (maybe), Isabella should be practicing.

to:

* CrowningMomentOfHeartwarming: Mariana is pleading for her husband's new husband Angelo's life, and asks Isabella to get on her knees before the Duke to help Mariana. Mariana's husband her. Angelo tried to rape Isabella and kill Isabella, broke his promise to spare her brother, brother in exchange for sex, and has been Isabella's enemy for the whole play. Increasingly hysterical, Mariana begs Isabella to get on her knees, and none of the bystanders think she will...And then Isabella gets on her knees beside Mariana and begs for Angelo's life despite all he tried to do. A beautiful example of the Christian mercy that as a future nun (maybe), Isabella should be practicing.
5th Mar '14 10:39:59 PM vifetoile
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* TrueArtIsAngsty: This is one of the darkest of Shakespeare's comedies.

to:

* TrueArtIsAngsty: This is one of the darkest of Shakespeare's comedies. But it's also one of his less popular plays. Perhaps that fact averts the trope, ultimately.
4th Jan '14 2:37:24 PM Redmess
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Added DiffLines:

** What makes this doubly heartwarming is that she now shows genuine mercy, not the cold, distant mercy she showed her brother earlier.
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