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History YMMV / LittleWomen

1st May '16 8:36:25 PM Angeldeb82
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** According to some versions of the book, Laurie had an older sister who died when both of them were little kids. It's not said ''how'' she died, but it may have been an illness since Laurie himself was kind of an IllBoy as a child.

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** According to some versions of the book, Laurie had an older sister who died when both of them were little kids. It's not said ''how'' she died, but it may have been an illness since Laurie himself was kind of an IllBoy [[IllGirl Ill Boy]] as a child.
1st May '16 8:35:14 PM Angeldeb82
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* FairForItsDay: The series was actually comparatively feminist by the standards of the time -- especially "Jo's Boys", which is set in a co-ed college, struggles openly with the concepts of gender equality, and comes to some surprisingly modern conclusions. In particular, Annie ''aka'' Nan is portrayed as a capable and independent young woman who treats Tommy Bangs' insistence on their ChildhoodMarriagePromise with open amusement, choosing to pursue her medical studies instead and ending up a successful single doctor. All the while Daisy's own choice to marry her VictoriousChildhoodFriend Nat and become a HouseWife is ''also'' seen as valid and worthy of respect.

to:

* FairForItsDay: The series was actually comparatively feminist by the standards of the time -- especially "Jo's Boys", which is set in a co-ed college, struggles openly with the concepts of gender equality, and comes to some surprisingly modern conclusions. In particular, Annie ''aka'' Nan is portrayed as a capable and independent young woman who treats Tommy Bangs' insistence on their ChildhoodMarriagePromise with open amusement, choosing to pursue her medical studies instead and ending up a successful single doctor. All the while Daisy's own choice to marry her VictoriousChildhoodFriend {{Childhood Friend|Romance}} Nat and become a HouseWife {{Housewife}} is ''also'' seen as valid and worthy of respect.



* HeartwarmingMoment: The very end of the 1994 film:

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* HeartwarmingMoment: Sugarwiki/{{Heartwarming Moment|s}}: The very end of the 1994 film:



--> (Added later after the novel's publication and success) [[LampshadeHanging Good joke]]

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--> (Added later after the novel's publication and success) [[LampshadeHanging Good joke]]joke.]]



* NarmCharm: ''LittleWomen'' plots a course through [[PurpleProse wildly extravagant and sentimental prose]], [[AnAesop Aesops]] (some of them [[FamilyUnfriendlyAesop rather questionable]]) in [[OnceAnEpisode nearly every chapter]]... and comes out as a gripping romantic drama with a deserved place in the highest pantheon of American literature.
* PuritySue: Amy grows from a vain, spoiled, pretentious, tantrum-throwing little girl into the unabashed epitome of tact, taste, beauty and gentility as a woman, with next-to-no warning. Partly understandable when you realise she was based on Alcott's own younger sister May, who died after the book was published and left her daughter Louisa to be raised by Alcott. Also, Amy is kept ''deliberately'' in the background of the sequels, and is described as someone who doesn't seem to age -- as a way for Alcott to remember her dead sister and cope with her absence.
** Beth is ''so'' sweet and kind and is the only sister with no apparent flaws, aside from shyness and low self esteem. She always had elements of SympatheticSue as well, even ''before'' she became an IllGirl. Her real life counterpart died, too.
** Daisy is described as Beth incarnate in the end of ''Little Women'' and reminds Jo of Beth again in ''Little Men''. Arguable, since while she has Sue-ish qualities she doesn't seal the spotlight.
** The "Princess" Bess in ''Jo's Boys'', which none of her fellow characters would ever try to deny.

to:

* NarmCharm: ''LittleWomen'' ''Literature/LittleWomen'' plots a course through [[PurpleProse wildly extravagant and sentimental prose]], [[AnAesop Aesops]] {{A|nAesop}}esops (some of them [[FamilyUnfriendlyAesop rather questionable]]) in [[OnceAnEpisode [[OncePerEpisode nearly every chapter]]... and comes out as a gripping romantic drama with a deserved place in the highest pantheon of American literature.
* PuritySue: Amy grows from a vain, spoiled, pretentious, tantrum-throwing little girl into the unabashed epitome of tact, taste, beauty and gentility as a woman, with next-to-no warning. Partly understandable when you realise she was based on Alcott's own younger sister May, who died after the book was published and left her daughter Louisa to be raised by Alcott. Also, Amy is kept ''deliberately'' in the background of the sequels, and is described as someone who doesn't seem to age -- as a way for Alcott to remember her dead sister and cope with her absence.
** Beth is ''so'' sweet and kind and is the only sister with no apparent flaws, aside from shyness and low self esteem. She always had elements of SympatheticSue as well, even ''before'' she became an IllGirl. Her real life counterpart died, too.
** Daisy is described as Beth incarnate in the end of ''Little Women'' and reminds Jo of Beth again in ''Little Men''. Arguable, since while she has Sue-ish qualities she doesn't seal the spotlight.
** The "Princess" Bess in ''Jo's Boys'', which none of her fellow characters would ever try to deny.
literature.



* TheWoobie: [[IllGirl Beth]]. Jo definitely has her moments as well.

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* TheWoobie: [[IllGirl Beth]]. Beth.]] Jo definitely has her moments as well.



** [[InspirationallyDisabled Dick Brown and Billy Ward]].

to:

** [[InspirationallyDisabled Dick Brown and Billy Ward]].Ward.]]
5th Apr '16 4:11:48 PM Shoebox
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Added DiffLines:

* PuritySue: Amy grows from a vain, spoiled, pretentious, tantrum-throwing little girl into the unabashed epitome of tact, taste, beauty and gentility as a woman, with next-to-no warning. Partly understandable when you realise she was based on Alcott's own younger sister May, who died after the book was published and left her daughter Louisa to be raised by Alcott. Also, Amy is kept ''deliberately'' in the background of the sequels, and is described as someone who doesn't seem to age -- as a way for Alcott to remember her dead sister and cope with her absence.
** Beth is ''so'' sweet and kind and is the only sister with no apparent flaws, aside from shyness and low self esteem. She always had elements of SympatheticSue as well, even ''before'' she became an IllGirl. Her real life counterpart died, too.
** Daisy is described as Beth incarnate in the end of ''Little Women'' and reminds Jo of Beth again in ''Little Men''. Arguable, since while she has Sue-ish qualities she doesn't seal the spotlight.
** The "Princess" Bess in ''Jo's Boys'', which none of her fellow characters would ever try to deny.
4th Apr '16 5:07:50 PM MagBas
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* NarmCharm: ''LittleWomen'' plots a course through {{Mary Sue}}s, [[PurpleProse wildly extravagant and sentimental prose]], [[AnAesop Aesops]] (some of them [[FamilyUnfriendlyAesop rather questionable]]) in [[OnceAnEpisode nearly every chapter]]... and comes out as a gripping romantic drama with a deserved place in the highest pantheon of American literature.
* PuritySue: Amy grows from a vain, spoiled, pretentious, tantrum-throwing little girl into the unabashed epitome of tact, taste, beauty and gentility as a woman, with next-to-no warning. Partly understandable when you realise she was based on Alcott's own younger sister May, who died after the book was published and left her daughter Louisa to be raised by Alcott. Also, Amy is kept ''deliberately'' in the background of the sequels, and is described as someone who doesn't seem to age -- as a way for Alcott to remember her dead sister and cope with her absence.
** Beth is ''so'' sweet and kind and is the only sister with no apparent flaws, aside from shyness and low self esteem. She always had elements of SympatheticSue as well, even ''before'' she became an IllGirl. Her real life counterpart died, too.
** Daisy is described as Beth incarnate in the end of ''Little Women'' and reminds Jo of Beth again in ''Little Men''. Arguable, since while she has Sue-ish qualities she doesn't seal the spotlight.
** The "Princess" Bess in ''Jo's Boys'', which none of her fellow characters would ever try to deny.

to:

* NarmCharm: ''LittleWomen'' plots a course through {{Mary Sue}}s, [[PurpleProse wildly extravagant and sentimental prose]], [[AnAesop Aesops]] (some of them [[FamilyUnfriendlyAesop rather questionable]]) in [[OnceAnEpisode nearly every chapter]]... and comes out as a gripping romantic drama with a deserved place in the highest pantheon of American literature.
* PuritySue: Amy grows from a vain, spoiled, pretentious, tantrum-throwing little girl into the unabashed epitome of tact, taste, beauty and gentility as a woman, with next-to-no warning. Partly understandable when you realise she was based on Alcott's own younger sister May, who died after the book was published and left her daughter Louisa to be raised by Alcott. Also, Amy is kept ''deliberately'' in the background of the sequels, and is described as someone who doesn't seem to age -- as a way for Alcott to remember her dead sister and cope with her absence.
** Beth is ''so'' sweet and kind and is the only sister with no apparent flaws, aside from shyness and low self esteem. She always had elements of SympatheticSue as well, even ''before'' she became an IllGirl. Her real life counterpart died, too.
** Daisy is described as Beth incarnate in the end of ''Little Women'' and reminds Jo of Beth again in ''Little Men''. Arguable, since while she has Sue-ish qualities she doesn't seal the spotlight.
** The "Princess" Bess in ''Jo's Boys'', which none of her fellow characters would ever try to deny.
literature.
4th Jan '16 1:39:21 PM youfeelingluckypunk27
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Added DiffLines:

** Beth in the 1949 film version is so cloyingly cute that her scenes lose their poignancy.
18th Oct '15 3:59:37 AM Mara
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** Right after John Brooke's death, Professor Bhaer tells his students he "[[TooGoodForThisSinfulEarth died as he has lived, so cheerfully, so peacefully]], that [[EmotionsVsStoicism it seems a sin to mar the beauty of it with any violent or selfish grief]]." Getting upset about the unexpected death of a close friend and relative as "selfish" and "a sin" would be an extremely hard sell in a children's book today.

to:

** Right after John Brooke's death, Professor Bhaer tells his students he "[[TooGoodForThisSinfulEarth died "died as he has lived, so cheerfully, so peacefully]], peacefully, that [[EmotionsVsStoicism it seems a sin to mar the beauty of it with any violent or selfish grief]].grief." [[EmotionsVsStoicism Getting upset about the unexpected death of a close friend and relative as "selfish" and "a sin" would be an extremely hard sell in a children's book today.]]
14th Oct '15 1:37:46 AM Mara
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** Right after John Brooke's death, Professor Bhaer tells his students he "[[TooGoodForThisSinfulEarth died as he has lived, so cheerfully, so peacefully]], that [[EmotionsVsStoicism it seems a sin to mar the beauty of it with any violent or selfish grief]]." Mourning the unexpected death of a close friend and relative as "selfish" and "a sin" would be an extremely hard sell in a children's book today.

to:

** Right after John Brooke's death, Professor Bhaer tells his students he "[[TooGoodForThisSinfulEarth died as he has lived, so cheerfully, so peacefully]], that [[EmotionsVsStoicism it seems a sin to mar the beauty of it with any violent or selfish grief]]." Mourning Getting upset about the unexpected death of a close friend and relative as "selfish" and "a sin" would be an extremely hard sell in a children's book today.
9th Oct '15 2:34:50 AM Mara
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** Right after John Brooke's death, Professor Bhaer tells his students he "[[TooGoodForThisSinfulEarth died as he has lived, so cheerfully, so peacefully]], that [[EmotionsVsStoicism it seems a sin to mar the beauty of it with any violent or selfish grief]]." Mourning a close friend and relative as "selfish" and "a sin" would be an extremely hard sell in a children's book today.

to:

** Right after John Brooke's death, Professor Bhaer tells his students he "[[TooGoodForThisSinfulEarth died as he has lived, so cheerfully, so peacefully]], that [[EmotionsVsStoicism it seems a sin to mar the beauty of it with any violent or selfish grief]]." Mourning the unexpected death of a close friend and relative as "selfish" and "a sin" would be an extremely hard sell in a children's book today.
9th Oct '15 2:22:46 AM Mara
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** Interestingly, the different film versions of ''Little Women'' all echo the values of the time in which they were made:

to:

** Interestingly, the different film versions of ''Little Women'' all echo the values of the time in which they were made:made, to the point of contradicting each other:
9th Oct '15 2:16:25 AM Mara
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-->"Grandpa, must women always obey men and say they are the wisest, just because they are the strongest?" she cried, looking fiercely at her cousin, who came stalking up with a provoking smile on the boyish face that was always very comical atop of that tall figure.
-->"Well, my dear, that is the old-fashioned belief, and it will take some time to change it. But I think the woman's hour has struck; and it looks to me as if the boys must do their best, for the girls are abreast now, and may reach the goal first," answered Mr March, surveying with paternal satisfaction the bright faces of the young women, who were among the best students in the college.

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-->"Grandpa, --->"Grandpa, must women always obey men and say they are the wisest, just because they are the strongest?" she cried, looking fiercely at her cousin, who came stalking up with a provoking smile on the boyish face that was always very comical atop of that tall figure.
-->"Well, --->"Well, my dear, that is the old-fashioned belief, and it will take some time to change it. But I think the woman's hour has struck; and it looks to me as if the boys must do their best, for the girls are abreast now, and may reach the goal first," answered Mr March, surveying with paternal satisfaction the bright faces of the young women, who were among the best students in the college.



-->[[http://www.womenwriters.net/domesticgoddess/thesis5.htm When we view the 1933 version, we are reminded of a nation during the Depression that needed to see the March girls' benign poverty and nostalgic family togetherness. The 1949 version, with its two shopping trips, reinforces how important it is for a woman to be a consumer, and the 1994 version supports strong, unconventional, feminist women.]]

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-->[[http://www.--->[[http://www.womenwriters.net/domesticgoddess/thesis5.htm When we view the 1933 version, we are reminded of a nation during the Depression that needed to see the March girls' benign poverty and nostalgic family togetherness. The 1949 version, with its two shopping trips, reinforces how important it is for a woman to be a consumer, and the 1994 version supports strong, unconventional, feminist women.]]
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