History YMMV / LittleWomen

15th Nov '17 6:38:22 PM Shoebox
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** At the end of ''Little Women'' one of the students at the Bhaers' school is [[ModelMinority "a merry little quadroon, who could not be taken in elsewhere"]]. By the time Ms Alcott wrote ''Little Men'' this character had been replaced with [[BadButt (mixed-race) Dan]]. Now image Dan with "the sweetest voice of all."
** Katherine Hepburn rebuffing Laurie repeatedly in the 1933 version is hilarious to ''Film/BringingUpBaby'' fans. There ''she'' is the one pursuing an uninterested partner - and she ends up yanking him into her life. Guess she knew from experience.
** A few years earlier, Winona Ryder had beat Kirsten Dunst out for a role in ''Theatre/TheCrucible''. Now they star as sisters who have a bit of a rivalry.

to:

** At the end of ''Little Women'' one of the students at the Bhaers' school is [[ModelMinority "a merry little quadroon, who could not be taken in elsewhere"]]. By the time Ms Alcott wrote ''Little Men'' this character had been replaced with [[BadButt (mixed-race) Dan]]. Now image imagine Dan with "the sweetest voice of all."
** Katherine Hepburn rebuffing Laurie repeatedly in the 1933 version is hilarious to ''Film/BringingUpBaby'' fans. There ''she'' is the one pursuing an uninterested partner - and she ends up yanking him into her life. Guess she knew from experience.
** A few years earlier, Winona Ryder had beat Kirsten Dunst out for a role in ''Theatre/TheCrucible''. Now they star as sisters who have a bit of a rivalry.
".
15th Nov '17 6:36:57 PM Shoebox
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* {{Narm}}: The "Jo, your one beauty" line from Amy after Jo sells her hair in the 1994 version. [[BrutalHonesty Being rather blunt about how bad your sister looks now, aren't you dear?]]

to:

* {{Narm}}: The "Jo, your one beauty" beauty!" line from Amy after Jo sells the former cuts off her hair in tends to come off like this on film, as it's missing the 1994 version. narrator's careful buildup re: Jo's appearance. Without it, the line reads as Amy [[BrutalHonesty Being being rather blunt about how bad your sister looks now, aren't you dear?]]



* ReplacementScrappy: In the 1994 film Amy is the only sister to be played by a TimeShiftedActor. For some, Kirsten Dunst's performance as the younger Amy is so good that Samantha Mathis can't [[ToughActToFollow follow her]] as the adult Amy.



* TheScrappy: Amy is widely disliked among fans, and not just for DieForOurShip. As a child, she's a bratty little thing, and burns Jo's manuscript just because she doesn't get taken to the theatre. And when she grows up, she becomes so annoyingly perfect that it feels like CharacterShilling.
* SeparatedAtBirthCasting: In the 1994 film, Claire Danes (Beth) and Samantha Mathis (adult Amy) look quite alike and can easily pass for sisters.
* SheReallyCanAct: Katherine Hepburn had a growing HypeBacklash to her sudden rise to fame on the screen. Then she starred in the 1933 version, and many of her detractors went away.

to:

* TheScrappy: Amy is widely disliked among fans, and not just for DieForOurShip. As a child, she's a bratty little thing, and burns Jo's manuscript just because she doesn't get taken to the theatre. And when she grows up, she becomes so annoyingly perfect that it feels like CharacterShilling.
* SeparatedAtBirthCasting: In the 1994 film, Claire Danes (Beth) and Samantha Mathis (adult Amy) look quite alike and can easily pass for sisters.
* SheReallyCanAct: Katherine Hepburn had a growing HypeBacklash to her sudden rise to fame on the screen. Then she starred in the 1933 version, and many of her detractors went away.
CharacterShilling



* TheyWastedAPerfectlyGoodCharacter: Some feel that Beth doesn't get enough screen time in the 1994 version.



** Jo's, [[AuthorAppeal and the author's]], open fangirling over German thought and culture, very much in keeping with the fashions of the time (yes, there was a period during which Germans were stereotyped as sentimental) later got a little awkward given German-American relations in the first half of the 20th century. Things have improved dramatically since, of course, but it's still faintly bemusing to the modern reader.

to:

** Jo's, [[AuthorAppeal and the author's]], open fangirling over German thought and culture, while very much in keeping with the fashions of the time (yes, there was a period during which Germans were stereotyped as sentimental) later sentimental philosophers) eventually got a little awkward given German-American relations in the first half of the 20th century. Things have improved dramatically since, of course, but it's still faintly bemusing to the modern reader.
12th Nov '17 3:22:23 AM fearlessnikki
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Added DiffLines:

** A few years earlier, Winona Ryder had beat Kirsten Dunst out for a role in ''Theatre/TheCrucible''. Now they star as sisters who have a bit of a rivalry.


Added DiffLines:

* ReplacementScrappy: In the 1994 film Amy is the only sister to be played by a TimeShiftedActor. For some, Kirsten Dunst's performance as the younger Amy is so good that Samantha Mathis can't [[ToughActToFollow follow her]] as the adult Amy.
19th Sep '17 8:04:34 PM Wolfberries
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Added DiffLines:

18th Jul '17 3:14:25 AM annette12
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* TastesLikeDiabetes: Can come across as such to a modern reader unused to the straight-forwardly sentimental tone and earnest moralising very typical of children's literature of the time.

to:

* TastesLikeDiabetes: TastesLikeDiabetes:
**
Can come across as such to a modern reader unused to the straight-forwardly sentimental tone and earnest moralising very typical of children's literature of the time.
19th Jun '17 4:06:45 PM NateTheGreat
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** In ''Little Men'' [[EducationMama Billy Ward's father]] is illustrated as having pushed his son's education far too hard by "keeping him at his books six hours a day". Nowadays six-hour school days are the bare minimum (not counting homework). Internationally some school days go as long as sixteen hours.

to:

** In ''Little Men'' [[EducationMama Billy Ward's father]] is illustrated as having pushed his son's education far too hard by "keeping him at his books six hours a day". Nowadays six-hour school days are the bare minimum (not counting homework). Internationally some school days go as long as sixteen hours. (Although odds are Billy was doing the same reading and writing the whole time, without any of the breaks for recess, liberal arts, etc. that are considered healthy today.)
21st May '17 4:58:47 PM Mara
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* SeparatedAtBirthCasting: In the -94 film, Claire Danes (Beth) and Samantha Mathis (adult Amy) look quite alike and can easily pass for sisters.

to:

* SeparatedAtBirthCasting: In the -94 1994 film, Claire Danes (Beth) and Samantha Mathis (adult Amy) look quite alike and can easily pass for sisters.



* TastesLikeDiabetes:
** Can come across as such to a modern reader unused to the straight-forwardly sentimental tone and earnest moralising very typical of children's literature of the time.

to:

* TastesLikeDiabetes:
**
TastesLikeDiabetes: Can come across as such to a modern reader unused to the straight-forwardly sentimental tone and earnest moralising very typical of children's literature of the time.



* UnintentionallySympathetic: Jo, when Amy [[DisproportionateRetribution burns her manuscript]] because Jo doesn't take her on an outing to the theatre. As per the moral imperative mentioned in TastesLikeDiabetes above, the intended focus of the chapter (actually called "Jo Meets Apollyon") is clearly Jo's recognition of and resolve to control her violent temper. The modern reader is much more likely to hone in on the fact that it was the only copy of the manuscript that Jo had spent years pouring her heart into. Adding to which Amy, however genuinely remorseful at first, quickly starts to get petulant when she isn't forgiven right away. And when Jo goes out skating with Laurie, leading Amy to whine about missing another outing, [[UnwittingInstigatorOfDoom Meg]] doesn't help matters at all by blithely suggesting that the little girl tag along where she clearly isn't wanted.

to:

* UnintentionallySympathetic: Jo, when Amy [[DisproportionateRetribution burns her manuscript]] because Jo doesn't take her on an outing to the theatre. As per the moral imperative mentioned in TastesLikeDiabetes above, imperative, the intended focus of the chapter (actually called "Jo Meets Apollyon") is clearly Jo's recognition of and resolve to control her violent temper. The modern reader is much more likely to hone in on the fact that it was the only copy of the manuscript that Jo had spent years pouring her heart into. Adding to which Amy, however genuinely remorseful at first, quickly starts to get petulant when she isn't forgiven right away. And when Jo goes out skating with Laurie, leading Amy to whine about missing another outing, [[UnwittingInstigatorOfDoom Meg]] doesn't help matters at all by blithely suggesting that the little girl tag along where she clearly isn't wanted.



** Jo's--and the author's--open fangirling over German thought and culture, very much in keeping with the fashions of the time (yes, there was a period during which Germans were stereotyped as sentimental...) later got a little awkward given German-American relations in the first half of the 20th century. Things have improved dramatically since, of course, but it's still faintly bemusing to the modern reader.
** In ''Little Men'' [[EducationMama Billy Ward's father]] is illustrated as having pushed his son's education far too hard by "keeping him at his books six hours a day". Nowadays seven hour school days are the absolute minimum (not counting homework). Internationally some school days go as long as sixteen hours.
** This shows up again more explicitly in one of Alcott's non-March novels, ''Jack and Jill''. Near the end of which Jack's mother - portrayed throughout as a cultured and thoughtful woman - informs her sons she's going to cut back their study hours drastically, for their own good. This is taken to the extent of deliberately delaying the older brother's entry into college. Hilariously to the modern reader, the boys protest loudly at this, to no avail.

to:

** Jo's--and Jo's, [[AuthorAppeal and the author's--open author's]], open fangirling over German thought and culture, very much in keeping with the fashions of the time (yes, there was a period during which Germans were stereotyped as sentimental...) sentimental) later got a little awkward given German-American relations in the first half of the 20th century. Things have improved dramatically since, of course, but it's still faintly bemusing to the modern reader.
** In ''Little Men'' [[EducationMama Billy Ward's father]] is illustrated as having pushed his son's education far too hard by "keeping him at his books six hours a day". Nowadays seven hour six-hour school days are the absolute bare minimum (not counting homework). Internationally some school days go as long as sixteen hours.
** *** This shows up again more explicitly in one of Alcott's non-March novels, ''Jack and Jill''. Near the end of which Jack's mother - portrayed throughout as a cultured and thoughtful woman - informs her sons she's going to cut back their study hours drastically, for their own good. This is taken to the extent of deliberately delaying the older brother's entry into college. Hilariously to the modern reader, the boys protest loudly at this, to no avail.



** [[HeartwarmingOrphan Nat Blake]] from ''Little Men''.
** [[InspirationallyDisabled Dick Brown and Billy Ward.]]

to:

** [[HeartwarmingOrphan Nat Blake]] from ''Little Men''.
Blake the HeartwarmingOrphan.
** [[InspirationallyDisabled InspirationallyDisabled Dick Brown and Billy Ward.]]
16th May '17 10:37:44 PM Mara
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** At the end of ''Little Women'' one of the students at the Bhaers' school is "a merry little quadroon, who could not be taken in elsewhere". By the time Ms Alcott wrote ''Little Men'' this character had been replaced with (mixed-race) Dan. Now image Dan with "the sweetest voice of all."

to:

** At the end of ''Little Women'' one of the students at the Bhaers' school is [[ModelMinority "a merry little quadroon, who could not be taken in elsewhere". elsewhere"]]. By the time Ms Alcott wrote ''Little Men'' this character had been replaced with [[BadButt (mixed-race) Dan.Dan]]. Now image Dan with "the sweetest voice of all."
20th Feb '17 11:13:43 AM Shoebox
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** Jo's (and the author's) fangirling of German thought and culture got a little awkward given German-American relations in the first half of the 20th century. Not so much now, given that things have gotten much better between the two countries.

to:

** Jo's (and Jo's--and the author's) author's--open fangirling of over German thought and culture culture, very much in keeping with the fashions of the time (yes, there was a period during which Germans were stereotyped as sentimental...) later got a little awkward given German-American relations in the first half of the 20th century. Not so much now, given that things Things have gotten much better between improved dramatically since, of course, but it's still faintly bemusing to the two countries.modern reader.
20th Feb '17 11:08:39 AM Shoebox
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Added DiffLines:

** The opening chapter of ''Jo's Boys'' unceremoniously informs us that [[BuryYourDisabled physically disabled Dick and mentally disabled Billy]] are [[KilledOffscreen dead now]]. And "no one could mourn for them, since life would never be happy, afflicted as they were in mind and body". While the idea that [[FateWorseThanDeath death is preferable to disability]] is still around, [[FamilyUnfriendlyAesop it's far less acceptable]], let alone charitable or sympathetic.
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