History YMMV / LittleHouseOnThePrairie

27th May '16 2:54:54 PM Jayalaw
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* HarsherInHindsight: The end of ''These Happy Golden Years'' can become this, after reading ''The First Four Years''. The Wilders are initially quite optimistic about their future, but the first years of their marriage turn out to be one almost-unmitigated disaster. Drought causes their crops to continually fail, they both come down with diphtheria (which gives Almanzo a ''stroke'', leaving him dependent on a cane for the rest of his life), their infant son dies, and then their house burns down and they subsequently lose both claims. If it weren't based on real events, it would be a complete ShootTheShaggyDog story.

to:

* HarsherInHindsight: The end of ''These Happy Golden Years'' can become this, after reading ''The First Four Years''. Caroline frets about Laura deciding to get married in her new black cashmere dress, because it invites bad luck. The Wilders are initially quite optimistic about their future, but the first years of their marriage turn out to be one almost-unmitigated disaster. Drought causes their crops to continually fail, they both come down with diphtheria (which gives Almanzo a ''stroke'', leaving him dependent on a cane for the rest of his life), their infant son dies, and then their house burns down and they subsequently lose both claims. If it weren't based on real events, in which Laura and Almanzo managed to build a new life after moving to Missouri, it would be a complete ShootTheShaggyDog story.
26th May '16 7:18:06 PM Jayalaw
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* HollywoodHomely[=/=]IAmNotPretty: Laura's rather critical of and dissatisfied with her own appearance; she envies Nellie Oleson her blonde hair and tall, willowy figure, as she herself is quite short, plump and brunette. In reality, she was a very [[http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/1/10/Laura_Ingalls_Wilder.jpg pretty]] [[http://www.notablebiographies.com/images/uewb_10_img0726.jpg girl]].

to:

* HollywoodHomely[=/=]IAmNotPretty: HollywoodHomely:
**
Laura's rather critical of and dissatisfied with her own appearance; she envies Nellie Oleson her blonde hair and tall, willowy figure, as she herself is quite short, plump and brunette. In reality, she was a very [[http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/1/10/Laura_Ingalls_Wilder.jpg pretty]] [[http://www.notablebiographies.com/images/uewb_10_img0726.jpg girl]].



* [[PuritySue Purity Stu]]: Almanzo's father James Wilder. When not being shown, we are repeatedly and explicitly told in ''Farmer Boy'' that he is the best farmer and the smartest, shrewdest, most important and respected man in his community, not to say a kind, fair, understanding, all-round great dad. Mitigated somewhat in that the story is told from the POV of his hero-worshipping small son, presumably also as filtered through the much older Almanzo's nostalgic memories.

to:

* [[PuritySue Purity Stu]]: Stu]]:
**
Almanzo's father James Wilder. When not being shown, we are repeatedly and explicitly told in ''Farmer Boy'' that he is the best farmer and the smartest, shrewdest, most important and respected man in his community, not to say a kind, fair, understanding, all-round great dad. Mitigated somewhat in that the story is told from the POV of his hero-worshipping small son, presumably also as filtered through the much older Almanzo's nostalgic memories.



* TearJerker: The death of Laura's son, especially so close after her and Almanzo's diphtheria, which was followed by Almanzo having a ''stroke''. Modern medical theory is that the baby was conceived too soon after the diphtheria and died as a result.

to:

* TearJerker: TearJerker:
**
The death of Laura's son, especially so close after her and Almanzo's diphtheria, which was followed by Almanzo having a ''stroke''. Modern medical theory is that the baby was conceived too soon after the diphtheria and died as a result.


Added DiffLines:

* WhatAnIdiot: All of Eliza Jane's actions in ''Little Town on the Prairie'' and ''These Happy Golden Years''. First is as an EstablishingCharacterMoment for Laura-- Almanzo had given [[JerkWithAHeartOfGold his thoughts on his sister]] in ''Farmer Boy''-- she immediately takes away the desk that Mary Powers and Minnie were promised when Nellie Oleson demands it, which sows discontent. Then, after hearing from Nellie that Laura was "bragging" about her father being on the school board, she takes out her fury on Laura [[MisplacedRetribution and Carrie]] instead of talking to Charles about Laura's supposed arrogance and letting him handle it given the ValuesDissonance mentioned above. Not to mention she listened to Nellie and believed her [[VillainsNeverLie without considering the source]] which a teacher as a ReasonableAuthorityFigure isn't supposed to do when there are two sides to a story. Making Carrie rock the chair when Carrie's too weak, and sending The Ingalls home when she rocks the chair so loudly that no one can concentrate, is TheLastStraw for the boys in Laura's class, who rebel on her behalf. As a result of these cascading actions, Eliza Jane leaves rather abruptly after the school board barges in on her class suffering disruption, belatedly telling Charles what Nellie told her after the damage has been done. Her two replacements are ''far'' better, which shows how stupid her actions were. Then, a few years later, when her brother is marrying Laura, she has the bright idea of convincing her mother to come to the West and force Almanzo to have a church wedding that no one can afford, which forces Laura and Almanzo to have a rushed, small ceremony with only two witnesses. This means she misses her brother's wedding and doesn't mend any bridges with Laura as a result.
29th Apr '16 10:26:50 AM GothicProphet
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ShipTease: There were some hints that Cap Garland had in interest an Laura.

to:

* ShipTease: There were some hints that Cap Garland had in an interest an in Laura.
29th Nov '15 9:19:02 AM ANewMan
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* ReplacementScrappy: Nancy for Nellie.
10th Nov '15 11:32:31 AM Anddrix
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** The blackface minstrel show -- complete with jaunty assurance that "These darkies can't be beat!" -- in ''Little Town on the Prairie'', in which Pa takes part. Not precisely intentional; while the real Laura's experience with actual people of colour was severely limited, it seems to have been amicable. Back in that era, one didn't need to be overtly racist to find that kind of thing hilarious. The UnfortunateImplications and DudeNotFunny didn't show up until several decades after the books were written.

to:

** The blackface minstrel show -- complete with jaunty assurance that "These darkies can't be beat!" -- in ''Little Town on the Prairie'', in which Pa takes part. Not precisely intentional; while the real Laura's experience with actual people of colour was severely limited, it seems to have been amicable. Back in that era, one didn't need to be overtly racist to find that kind of thing hilarious. The UnfortunateImplications and DudeNotFunny didn't show up until several decades after the books were written.
31st Aug '15 11:57:46 PM Tuckerscreator
Is there an issue? Send a Message


*** NELLIE's music box!
*** Ah. Mea culpa.
31st Aug '15 11:46:50 PM shamblingdead2
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* NightmareFuel: Mostly in the form of the ridiculously varied and unpredictable dangers of living on the unsettled prairie. The whole family bedridden with malaria at the same time with no one around to help until the nearest neighbors happen to check on them; all the times anyone gets stranded out in a blizzard and nearly doesn't make it back (or actually doesn't, in some secondhand stories), especially when it's made clear just how close someone could be to shelter and not even know it; the tornadoes, the fire, and most of all the "grasshopper weather." And although there's an almost oppressively civilized, Victorian tone to a lot of the social interaction in the books, TheWildWest creeps in here and there: the railroad workers in ''By the Shores of Silver Lake'', particularly the mob that nearly attacks Pa; the story of a homesteader who left his farm briefly and came back to find a squatter there who shot him dead; and even Mrs. Brewster, the wife in the family Laura stays with when she's teaching school, who is so homesick and stir-crazy from isolation that she's become dysfunctional and abusive to her husband and threatens him with a butcher knife one night ("If I can't go home one way, I can another").

to:

* NightmareFuel: Mostly in the form of the ridiculously varied and unpredictable dangers of living on the unsettled prairie. The whole family bedridden with malaria at the same time with no one around to help until the nearest neighbors happen to check on them; all the times anyone gets stranded out in a blizzard and nearly doesn't make it back (or actually doesn't, in some secondhand stories), especially when it's made clear just how close someone could be to shelter and not even know it; the tornadoes, the fire, and most of all the "grasshopper weather." And although there's an almost oppressively civilized, Victorian tone to a lot of the social interaction in the books, TheWildWest creeps in here and there: the railroad workers in ''By the Shores of Silver Lake'', particularly the mob that nearly attacks Pa; the story of a homesteader who left his farm briefly and came back to find a squatter there who shot him dead; and even Mrs. Brewster, the wife in the family Laura stays with when she's teaching school, who is so homesick and stir-crazy from isolation (and she's possibly bipolar, from the description) that she's become dysfunctional and abusive to her husband and threatens him with a butcher knife one night ("If I can't go home one way, I can another").
31st Aug '15 11:44:45 PM shamblingdead2
Is there an issue? Send a Message


*** At one point in ''Little House On The Prairie'', Pa gives Mary and Laura a stern lecture for even ''thinking'' about disobeying him(though they didn't actually do so).

to:

*** At one point in ''Little House On The Prairie'', Pa gives Mary and Laura a stern lecture for even ''thinking'' about disobeying him(though they didn't actually do so). Although, to be fair, in that case it might have gotten their dog killed. A couple of Native men had gone into the house looking for food and supplies. Pa had told them not to untie Jack, who hated strangers. If Jack had bitten one of the strange men, they would have killed Jack and caused MANY more problems.
19th Aug '15 12:30:16 PM K
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

** One early edition of ''Little House on the Prairie'' described the local Native Americans, then ended with "There were no people there." Upon receiving a letter that this implied the Native Americans were not people, Laura and Rose wrote back to the publisher that was ''certainly'' not meant to be the implication, and the sentence was removed.
30th May '15 4:38:15 PM K
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Women's rights comes up a couple of times near the end of the series. Laura-the-Author never quite passes judgment on the idea, although Laura-the-character says she doesn't want to vote, she's just independent and not comfortable vowing to obey her husband against her better judgment. So Laura demands to be treated as a free-thinking individual by her husband, yes, but is still mostly content to stay in the domestic sphere.

to:

** Women's rights comes up a couple of times near the end of the series. Laura-the-Author never quite passes judgment on the idea, although Laura-the-character says she doesn't want to vote, she's just independent and not comfortable vowing to obey her husband against her better judgment. So Laura demands to be treated as a free-thinking individual by her husband, yes, but is still mostly content to stay in as a housewife and stay-at-home mom-- though she did, historically, work outside the domestic sphere.home in different ways throughout her marriage-- as a dressmaker, loan officer, bookkeeper, and writer, at different points in time.
This list shows the last 10 events of 62. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=YMMV.LittleHouseOnThePrairie