History YMMV / LittleHouseOnThePrairie

29th Nov '15 9:19:02 AM ANewMan
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* ReplacementScrappy: Nancy for Nellie.
10th Nov '15 11:32:31 AM Anddrix
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** The blackface minstrel show -- complete with jaunty assurance that "These darkies can't be beat!" -- in ''Little Town on the Prairie'', in which Pa takes part. Not precisely intentional; while the real Laura's experience with actual people of colour was severely limited, it seems to have been amicable. Back in that era, one didn't need to be overtly racist to find that kind of thing hilarious. The UnfortunateImplications and DudeNotFunny didn't show up until several decades after the books were written.
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** The blackface minstrel show -- complete with jaunty assurance that "These darkies can't be beat!" -- in ''Little Town on the Prairie'', in which Pa takes part. Not precisely intentional; while the real Laura's experience with actual people of colour was severely limited, it seems to have been amicable. Back in that era, one didn't need to be overtly racist to find that kind of thing hilarious. The UnfortunateImplications and DudeNotFunny didn't show up until several decades after the books were written.
31st Aug '15 11:57:46 PM Tuckerscreator
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Natter.
*** NELLIE's music box! *** Ah. Mea culpa.
31st Aug '15 11:46:50 PM shamblingdead2
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* NightmareFuel: Mostly in the form of the ridiculously varied and unpredictable dangers of living on the unsettled prairie. The whole family bedridden with malaria at the same time with no one around to help until the nearest neighbors happen to check on them; all the times anyone gets stranded out in a blizzard and nearly doesn't make it back (or actually doesn't, in some secondhand stories), especially when it's made clear just how close someone could be to shelter and not even know it; the tornadoes, the fire, and most of all the "grasshopper weather." And although there's an almost oppressively civilized, Victorian tone to a lot of the social interaction in the books, TheWildWest creeps in here and there: the railroad workers in ''By the Shores of Silver Lake'', particularly the mob that nearly attacks Pa; the story of a homesteader who left his farm briefly and came back to find a squatter there who shot him dead; and even Mrs. Brewster, the wife in the family Laura stays with when she's teaching school, who is so homesick and stir-crazy from isolation that she's become dysfunctional and abusive to her husband and threatens him with a butcher knife one night ("If I can't go home one way, I can another").
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* NightmareFuel: Mostly in the form of the ridiculously varied and unpredictable dangers of living on the unsettled prairie. The whole family bedridden with malaria at the same time with no one around to help until the nearest neighbors happen to check on them; all the times anyone gets stranded out in a blizzard and nearly doesn't make it back (or actually doesn't, in some secondhand stories), especially when it's made clear just how close someone could be to shelter and not even know it; the tornadoes, the fire, and most of all the "grasshopper weather." And although there's an almost oppressively civilized, Victorian tone to a lot of the social interaction in the books, TheWildWest creeps in here and there: the railroad workers in ''By the Shores of Silver Lake'', particularly the mob that nearly attacks Pa; the story of a homesteader who left his farm briefly and came back to find a squatter there who shot him dead; and even Mrs. Brewster, the wife in the family Laura stays with when she's teaching school, who is so homesick and stir-crazy from isolation (and she's possibly bipolar, from the description) that she's become dysfunctional and abusive to her husband and threatens him with a butcher knife one night ("If I can't go home one way, I can another").
31st Aug '15 11:44:45 PM shamblingdead2
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*** At one point in ''Little House On The Prairie'', Pa gives Mary and Laura a stern lecture for even ''thinking'' about disobeying him(though they didn't actually do so).
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*** At one point in ''Little House On The Prairie'', Pa gives Mary and Laura a stern lecture for even ''thinking'' about disobeying him(though they didn't actually do so). Although, to be fair, in that case it might have gotten their dog killed. A couple of Native men had gone into the house looking for food and supplies. Pa had told them not to untie Jack, who hated strangers. If Jack had bitten one of the strange men, they would have killed Jack and caused MANY more problems.
19th Aug '15 12:30:16 PM K
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** One early edition of ''Little House on the Prairie'' described the local Native Americans, then ended with "There were no people there." Upon receiving a letter that this implied the Native Americans were not people, Laura and Rose wrote back to the publisher that was ''certainly'' not meant to be the implication, and the sentence was removed.
30th May '15 4:38:15 PM K
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** Women's rights comes up a couple of times near the end of the series. Laura-the-Author never quite passes judgment on the idea, although Laura-the-character says she doesn't want to vote, she's just independent and not comfortable vowing to obey her husband against her better judgment. So Laura demands to be treated as a free-thinking individual by her husband, yes, but is still mostly content to stay in the domestic sphere.
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** Women's rights comes up a couple of times near the end of the series. Laura-the-Author never quite passes judgment on the idea, although Laura-the-character says she doesn't want to vote, she's just independent and not comfortable vowing to obey her husband against her better judgment. So Laura demands to be treated as a free-thinking individual by her husband, yes, but is still mostly content to stay in as a housewife and stay-at-home mom-- though she did, historically, work outside the domestic sphere.home in different ways throughout her marriage-- as a dressmaker, loan officer, bookkeeper, and writer, at different points in time.
12th Apr '15 3:45:09 AM K
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** Women's rights comes up a couple of times near the end of the series. Laura-the-Author never quite passes judgment on the idea, although Laura-the-character says she doesn't want to vote, she's just independent and not comfortable vowing to obey her husband against her better judgment. So Laura demands to be treated as a free-thinking individual by her husband, yes, but is still mostly content to stay in the domestic sphere.
19th Oct '14 7:09:47 AM EnglishGuruLady
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** Actually, the sound of Laura's music box in the eponymous episode of 1977 counts as well, especially after it breaks.
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** Actually, the sound of Laura's Nellie's music box in the eponymous episode of 1977 counts as well, especially after it breaks.

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** Actually, the sound of Laura's music box in the eponymous episode of 1977 counts as well, especially after it breaks.***Ah. Mea culpa.
17th Oct '14 7:30:34 PM K
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** The pilot for the series was a more-or-less straightforward adaptation of the book ''Little House on the Prairie.'' The series itself began with the setting and stories of ''On the Banks of Plum Creek.''
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** The pilot for the series was a more-or-less straightforward adaptation of the book ''Little House on the Prairie.'' The series itself began with the setting and stories of ''On the Banks of Plum Creek.'''' Things like Mary's blindness, Miss Wilder teaching school, and Laura's marriage are from the post-''Plum Creek'' books, which all took place in De Smet, in what would later become South Dakota.
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