History YMMV / LittleHouseOnThePrairie

20th Jul '17 8:16:30 PM Enhas
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

** In the season one episode "Circus Man", Mr. Hanson is suffering from terrible headaches of which nothing seems to work. After taking O'Hara's miracle cure (which of course isn't really one), his headaches go away but Doc Baker warns him that the underlying condition hasn't been found or really treated. Come several seasons later, he suffers a massive stroke which leads to his eventual death.
14th Jul '17 6:34:42 AM Maddoxsort
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Also applies towards Michael Landon's tendency to rip scripts directly from ''Bonanza'' in general, having written and directed a few himself. The aforementioned one was remarkably {{Egregious}}, because it made absolutely no attempt to hide the fact it was repeating the events of the episode blow for blow.

to:

** TheyCopiedItSoItSucks: Also applies towards Michael Landon's tendency to rip scripts directly from ''Bonanza'' in general, having written and directed a few himself. The aforementioned one was remarkably {{Egregious}}, because it made absolutely no attempt to hide the fact it was repeating the events of the episode blow for blow.
14th Jul '17 6:31:58 AM Maddoxsort
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

** Any time Isaiah quietly pulls out the moonshine after getting married to Grace or she catches him operating a still. Their marriage collapsed in Season 8 because he couldn't knock the bottle.


Added DiffLines:

* ItsTheSameSoItSucks: "Will Someone Please Love Me?" is a lazy, almost completely '''word-for-word''' Xerox of an episode of ''Series/{{Bonanza}}'', with slightly altered dialogue and the actors putting on even less convincing performances than the original. Because the acting is ripping off that story, it comes off as wooden and stilted as well as totally unoriginal. On top of that, the actor playing the daughter is the ''exact same'' one used to play Alicia, Isaiah's adoptive daughter.
** Also applies towards Michael Landon's tendency to rip scripts directly from ''Bonanza'' in general, having written and directed a few himself. The aforementioned one was remarkably {{Egregious}}, because it made absolutely no attempt to hide the fact it was repeating the events of the episode blow for blow.
14th Jul '17 6:00:55 AM Maddoxsort
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Jeremy Quinn, Albert's biological father, turning up in Season 6 when Albert wants to be legally adopted. Jeremy just wants him on as a hand at his far to help him out around the place, not interested in being much of a father at this point in life, wifeless and all. When Albert has a hand in a very tragic fire at the blind school, he runs away from Walnut Grove out of grief, going to Jeremy as the last person he can turn to. When Albert stumbles upon his farm, he finds it eerily quiet... then stumbles upon a freshly-dug grave... Jeremy's. It's implied he worked himself to death on his own, someone found him keeled over, and then quietly buried him.
** Right before the end of Season 9, the last season, Laura is gifted a ''gorgeous'' estate by a dying widow who wants hers and her husband's dream home to be kept alive. Come ''The Last Farewell'', not three stories later, and the GrandFinale of the series, She and Alamanzo decide to ''blow it up''- because they realize it's going to fall into the seedy hands of a land baron no matter what they do and the best thing for it is [[MercyKill to let the dream die mercifully.]] Guess you're going to be haunted by their angry ghosts!!



* {{Narm}}

to:

** Almanzo blowing up the first house in ''The Last Farewell''- the one he and Laura got as a gift. Dramatic ominous music leading up to the moment he pushes down on the detonator. It's shot in slow motion and it erupts like one of those nuclear experiment houses in the 1940's. Also, Laura smashing out the windows in a fit of rage.
* {{Narm}}{{Narm}}: A lot of episodes are ''drowning'' with {{Melodrama}}. Seems like every other story somebody dies/already has a dead parent to milk the sympathy card, someone loses their source of income through a freak development beyond their control, a heavy-handed message gets thwacked over someone's head, or Laura runs off to cry. Sometimes all within the course of the same episode.
** Probably best seen in part two of "He Loves Me, He Loves Me Not". Almanzo has overworked himself trying to make money to help pay for renting a courthouse for Adam and Mary to start up a new location for the blind school. He gets sick and contracts pneumonia. As he passes out from sickness and refusal to go see a doctor, he falls down the stairs to the tune... of a '''''slide whistle.''''' This is ''absolutely'' inappropriate for the scene, given that Almanzo's sickness was played ''completely'' seriously, and the effect was totally cartoony.



* ReplacementScrappy: Nancy for Nellie.

to:

* ReplacementScrappy: Nancy for Nellie. [[IntendedAudienceReaction However, she's designed to be that way.]] Much worse than Nellie ever was, yet showered with love and spoiled rotten by Harriet anyway.


Added DiffLines:

** Charles not wearing a shirt to bed in the season one episode where they left Isaiah in charge of the household and both he and Caroline were all by themselves.
10th Apr '17 11:45:27 PM Maddoxsort
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* HarsherInHindsight: Laura did not pray for the good health of her newborn baby brother, [[spoiler: and he died very soon after]]. When Laura had a baby boy of her own, [[spoiler:''he'' died, too! And so fast that she didn't get to name her child!]]

to:

* HarsherInHindsight: Laura did not pray for the good health of her newborn baby brother, [[spoiler: and he died very soon after]]. after.]] When Laura had a baby boy of her own, [[spoiler:''he'' died, too! And so fast that she didn't get to name her child!]]



** There's also Nancy's "You haaaaaaaaaate me!" every time she doesn't get her way or is expected to obey a rule or do a chore.

to:

** There's also Nancy's "You haaaaaaaaaate me!" or "he hates me/she hates me/they hate me" every time she doesn't get her way or is expected to obey a rule or do a chore.



* NarmCharm: To many modern viewers, one of the only reasons to watch. The other being Michael Landon's perm.

to:

* NarmCharm: To many modern viewers, one of the only reasons to watch. The other being Michael Landon's perm. Or [[EnsembleDarkhorse Mr. Edwards.]]
10th Apr '17 11:43:06 PM Maddoxsort
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* HarsherInHindsight: Laura did not pray for the good health of her newborn baby brother, [[spoiler: and he died very soon after]]. When Laura had a baby boy of her own, [[spoiler:''he'' died, too! And so fast that she didn't get to name her child!]]
19th Mar '17 4:51:03 PM Noraneko
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* HarsherInHindsight: The end of ''These Happy Golden Years'' can become this, after reading ''The First Four Years''. Caroline frets about Laura deciding to get married in her new black cashmere dress, because it invites bad luck. The Wilders are initially quite optimistic about their future, but the first years of their marriage turn out to be one almost-unmitigated disaster. Drought causes their crops to continually fail, they both come down with diphtheria (which gives Almanzo a ''stroke'', leaving him dependent on a cane for the rest of his life), their infant son dies, and then their house burns down and they subsequently lose both claims. If it weren't based on real events, in which Laura and Almanzo managed to build a new life after moving to Missouri, it would be a complete ShootTheShaggyDog story.

to:

* HarsherInHindsight: The end of ''These Happy Golden Years'' can become this, after reading ''The First Four Years''. Caroline frets about Laura deciding to get married in her new black cashmere dress, because it invites bad luck. The Wilders are initially quite optimistic about their future, but the first years of their marriage turn out to be one almost-unmitigated disaster. Drought causes their crops to continually fail, they both come down with diphtheria (which gives Almanzo a ''stroke'', leaving him dependent on a cane for the rest of his life), their infant son dies, and then their house burns down and they subsequently lose both claims. If it weren't based on real events, in which Laura and Almanzo managed to build a new life after moving to Missouri, it would be a complete ShootTheShaggyDog story. Even then, Laura had been happy to live on the claim because it meant she was close to her beloved family, and after moving she was only able to visit her family once more before [[TearJerker her darling Pa dies]].


Added DiffLines:

** Laura being extremely homesick after she leaves for the first time to teach.
** Laura and Almanzo moving to Missouri means the chance for a better life, but she had loved the first claim because it meant she was extremely close to her family. She was only able to to visit her family once after she moves, and it's not until Rose is a teenager.
** Pa's death in the sequel series.
10th Mar '17 9:27:39 PM Jeduthun
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* UnfortunateImplications: The series' portrayal of Native Americans is... complicated. Pa talks about the Osage with respect but also doesn't mind building a claim on their land. Other characters taken an even dimmer view of the "savages", with multiple people repeating the infamous quote "The only good Indian is a dead Indian." For obvious reasons, many modern readers see this as highly problematic.
15th Oct '16 6:37:11 AM smittykins
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** One early edition of ''Little House on the Prairie'' described the local Native Americans, then ended with "There were no people there." Upon receiving a letter that this implied the Native Americans were not people, Laura and Rose wrote back to the publisher that was ''certainly'' not meant to be the implication, and the sentence was removed.

to:

** One early edition of ''Little House on the Prairie'' described the local Native Americans, then ended with "There were no people people. Only Indians lived there." Upon receiving a letter that this implied the Native Americans were not people, Laura and Rose wrote back to the publisher that was ''certainly'' not meant to be the implication, and the sentence was removed. changed to "There were no settlers."
8th Jul '16 2:40:50 PM EnglishGuruLady
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* AlternateCharacterInterpretation: Nellie Oleson may be a SpoiledBrat, but there is massive evidence to suggest the television version of Laura is actually worse, both as a child and an adult. Examples:
**She becomes angry that her newborn brother is taking Pa's attention, and rather than owning up to it, she [[IWishedYouWereDead prays for his death.]] Granted, [[spoiler: this does not ''cause'' the baby to die]], but it makes you feel less sympathetic toward her when she runs away as a result.
**As a matter of fact, Laura can be bratty any time someone seems to "steal" Pa's affection from her. For one, she reacts pretty badly to Albert after [[spoiler: his adoption and journey to Walnut Grove.]]
**Laura covets a music box from Oleson's store, steals it, and lies about it. Nellie then blackmails Laura, which includes forcing her to participate in cruelty toward Anna, a friend who has a stutter. Nellie is justly punished, but Laura is never punished for stealing, ostensibly because she had nightmares due to her guilt. It's unlikely many 1800s parents, and even modern ones, would respond this way.
**During Part 1 of "I'll Be Waving as You Drive Away," Laura becomes angry with Mary and says she hates her because allegedly, Mary "stole" her boyfriend (an older boy who only liked Laura as a friend). Later, Laura puts up a fuss when Caroline asks her to mop up a broken lamp (Mary had moved it too close to a book because of her failing eyes, and a chair had caught fire). Let us emphasize: Laura did not focus on the fire, nor did she even ask if Mary was okay. She ''also'' never seemed to put together that Mary might be unwell or going through severe stress. At the time, Laura is at least 12 and old enough to act more mature.
**During "Enchanted Cottage," Mary discovers she can distinguish between light and dark. An eye doctor appointment reveals [[spoiler: she can't; she's responding to the heat of sun and indoor lights.]] Laura is understandably shaken, but focuses on her own emotions more than Mary's. ''Mary'' ends up comforting and reassuring ''Laura,'' who again never seems to put together that she might be suffering emotionally.
**As an adult, Laura comes to believe Nellie is trying to steal Almanzo. Her response is to get into a knock-down, hair-pulling fight with Nellie. This is a ''grown woman'' we are talking about.
**During the season 8 opener, Laura finds out [[spoiler: she will be raising her niece Jenny, because Jenny's father is dying.]] Jenny responds by asking Rev. Alden about Heaven and[[spoiler: attempting to drown herself so she can go there to be with her parents.]] Laura is understandably anguished, but does not attempt to comfort Jenny at all. Instead, she yells at and lectures her, forgetting that one, [[spoiler: this child is depressed and suicidal]] and two, she probably does not understand the implications of her actions.
***In short, Laura Ingalls may be an innocent, wholesome protagonist--or she may be a brat with a hot temper and an ElectraComplex who, in particular, can't stand to have any important man in her life, not just her father, show kindness toward another female.
This list shows the last 10 events of 75. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=YMMV.LittleHouseOnThePrairie