History YMMV / JohnFord

1st Jan '16 6:39:30 AM AllenbysEyes
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** Creator/OrsonWelles watched ''Film/{{Stagecoach}}'' repeatedly for inspiration before coming to Hollywood to direct ''his'' first feature film: ''Film/CitizenKane''. You might have heard of it.
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** Creator/OrsonWelles watched ''Film/{{Stagecoach}}'' repeatedly for inspiration before coming to Hollywood to direct ''his'' first feature film: ''Film/CitizenKane''. You might have heard of it. Ford also recruited his cinematographer, Gregg Toland, after seeing the latter's work on Ford's ''Film/TheLongVoyageHome''.
14th Sep '15 9:06:12 PM RushLimborg
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* FairForItsDay: His portrayal of Native American characters is usually ''much'' better than most other Westerns from his time, which often treat them as barbarous, murderous savages. And despite some unfortunate instances of ModernMinstrelsy (such as the "squaw" in Film/TheSearchers), Ford at least treated them with a level of respect many other Western directors lacked, and Native American characters were often given more character traits than just "the Indian" or "the bad guy".
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* FairForItsDay: His portrayal of Native American characters is usually ''much'' better than most other Westerns from his time, which often treat them as barbarous, murderous savages. And despite some unfortunate instances of ModernMinstrelsy (such as the "squaw" in Film/TheSearchers), ''Film/TheSearchers''), Ford at least treated them with a level of respect many other Western directors lacked, and Native American characters were often given more character traits than just "the Indian" or "the bad guy".
14th Sep '15 9:05:45 PM RushLimborg
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* FairForItsDay: His portrayal of Native American characters is usually ''much'' better than most other Westerns from his time, which often treat them as barbarous, murderous savages. Ford at least treated them with a level of respect other Western directors lacked, and Native American characters were often given most character traits than just "the Indian."
to:
* FairForItsDay: His portrayal of Native American characters is usually ''much'' better than most other Westerns from his time, which often treat them as barbarous, murderous savages. And despite some unfortunate instances of ModernMinstrelsy (such as the "squaw" in Film/TheSearchers), Ford at least treated them with a level of respect many other Western directors lacked, and Native American characters were often given most more character traits than just "the Indian."Indian" or "the bad guy".
30th Jul '15 9:11:06 AM RushLimborg
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* AlternateCharacterInterpretation: Recently, Creator/QuentinTarantino has raised the issue of Ford's role as an extra in ''Film/BirthOfANation'', where he played one of the Klansmen. Ford scholars have always seen it as a throwaway gig (he had not started his career as a director and was working odd jobs at the time) but Tarantino sees it as indicative of a MoralEventHorizon regarding Ford's racism. Ford's portrayals of minority characters did indeed become more nuanced and FairForItsDay as time went on (compare ''Film/{{Stagecoach}}'' to ''Cheyenne Autumn'' for example, as well as ''Sergeant Rutledge''--one of the first films at the time with an African-American male lead). Still, Ford himself was typically the one to bring up his role in Griffith's film--and not in the context of apologizing or providing context for it. So was Ford honestly unaware of the racism of ''Birth of a Nation'' (unlikely); did he simply feel that MoneyDearBoy, or just a chance gig to appear in a film by the most respected director of his age, was an acceptable reason for appearing in it; or did he actually agree with the film's support of "separate but equal" as Quentin contends? [[note]]It should be noted Creator/DWGriffith was widely admired and respected by people of different political beliefs in his day, even by the likes of Creator/OrsonWelles and Creator/NicholasRay who were more openly anti-racist than others of their generation. The film fraternity generally respected Griffith for his technical achievements and saw "Birth of a Nation" as a landmark for the motion picture industry[[/note]].
to:
* AlternateCharacterInterpretation: Recently, Creator/QuentinTarantino has raised the issue of Ford's role as an extra in ''Film/BirthOfANation'', where he played one of the Klansmen. Ford scholars have always seen it as a throwaway gig (he had not started his career as a director and was working odd jobs at the time) but Tarantino sees it as indicative of a MoralEventHorizon regarding Ford's racism. Ford's portrayals of minority characters did indeed become more nuanced and FairForItsDay as time went on (compare ''Film/{{Stagecoach}}'' to ''Cheyenne Autumn'' for example, as well as ''Sergeant Rutledge''--one of the first films at the time with an African-American male lead). Still, Ford himself was typically the one to bring up his role in Griffith's film--and not in the context of apologizing or providing context for it. So was Ford honestly unaware of the racism of ''Birth of a Nation'' (unlikely); did he simply feel that MoneyDearBoy, or just a chance gig to appear in a film by the most respected director of his age, was an acceptable reason for appearing in it; or did he actually agree with the film's support of "separate but equal" as Quentin contends? [[note]]It should be noted Creator/DWGriffith was widely admired and respected by people of different political beliefs in his day, even by the likes of Creator/OrsonWelles and Creator/NicholasRay who were more openly anti-racist than others of their generation. The film fraternity generally respected Griffith for his technical achievements and saw "Birth of a Nation" as a landmark for the motion picture industry[[/note]].
30th Jul '15 9:09:14 AM RushLimborg
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Grammatical issues and clarification.
* AlternateCharacterInterpretation: Recently, Creator/QuentinTarantino has raised the issue of Ford's role as an extra in ''Film/BirthOfANation'', where he played one of the Klansmen. Ford scholars have always seen it as a throwaway gig (He had not started his career as a director and was working odd jobs at the time) but Tarantino sees it as indicative of Ford's racism. Ford's portrayals of minority characters did indeed become more nuanced and FairForItsDay (compare ''Film/{{Stagecoach}}'' to ''Cheyenne Autumn'' for example) as well as ''Sergeant Rutledge'' (one of the first films at the time with an African-American male lead). Was Ford honestly unaware of the racism of ''Birth of a Nation'' (unlikely), or did he simply feel that MoneyDearBoy, or a chance gig to appear in a film by the most respected director of his age was an acceptable reason for appearing in it, or did he actually agree with the film's support of "separate but equal" as Quentin contends? [[note]]It should be noted Creator/DWGriffith was widely admired and respected by people of different political beliefs in his day, even by the likes of Creator/OrsonWelles and Creator/NicholasRay who were more openly anti-racist than others of their generation. The film fraternity generally respected Griffith for his technical achievements and saw "Birth of a Nation" as a landmark for the motion picture industry[[/note]].
to:
* AlternateCharacterInterpretation: Recently, Creator/QuentinTarantino has raised the issue of Ford's role as an extra in ''Film/BirthOfANation'', where he played one of the Klansmen. Ford scholars have always seen it as a throwaway gig (He (he had not started his career as a director and was working odd jobs at the time) but Tarantino sees it as indicative of a MoralEventHorizon regarding Ford's racism. Ford's portrayals of minority characters did indeed become more nuanced and FairForItsDay as time went on (compare ''Film/{{Stagecoach}}'' to ''Cheyenne Autumn'' for example) example, as well as ''Sergeant Rutledge'' (one Rutledge''--one of the first films at the time with an African-American male lead). Was Still, Ford himself was typically the one to bring up his role in Griffith's film--and not in the context of apologizing or providing context for it. So was Ford honestly unaware of the racism of ''Birth of a Nation'' (unlikely), or (unlikely); did he simply feel that MoneyDearBoy, or just a chance gig to appear in a film by the most respected director of his age age, was an acceptable reason for appearing in it, it; or did he actually agree with the film's support of "separate but equal" as Quentin contends? [[note]]It should be noted Creator/DWGriffith was widely admired and respected by people of different political beliefs in his day, even by the likes of Creator/OrsonWelles and Creator/NicholasRay who were more openly anti-racist than others of their generation. The film fraternity generally respected Griffith for his technical achievements and saw "Birth of a Nation" as a landmark for the motion picture industry[[/note]].
29th Jul '15 9:09:42 PM JulianLapostat
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Okay, but there has to be a lot of nuance here...especially since Ford is being judged for being an extra and playing a fictional character.
* AlternateCharacterInterpretation: Creator/QuentinTarantino has notably pointed to Ford's portrayal of a Klansman in ''Film/BirthOfANation''--and never seeming to have regretted it (to the point where Ford himself was often the one to bring it up)--as a MoralEventHorizon of sorts. As his career progressed, Ford's portrayals of minority characters did indeed become more nuanced and FairForItsDay (compare ''Film/{{Stagecoach}}'' to ''Film/CheyenneAutumn'', for example), but Tarantino's words on the issue have led to no small amount of BrokenBase. Was Ford honestly unaware of the racism of ''Birth of a Nation'' (unlikely), or did he simply feel that MoneyDearBoy was an acceptable reason for appearing in it, or did he actually agree with the film's support of "separate but equal" as Quentin contends?
to:
* AlternateCharacterInterpretation: Recently, Creator/QuentinTarantino has notably pointed to raised the issue of Ford's portrayal of a Klansman role as an extra in ''Film/BirthOfANation''--and never seeming to have regretted it (to the point ''Film/BirthOfANation'', where he played one of the Klansmen. Ford himself was often the one to bring scholars have always seen it up)--as as a MoralEventHorizon of sorts. As throwaway gig (He had not started his career progressed, as a director and was working odd jobs at the time) but Tarantino sees it as indicative of Ford's racism. Ford's portrayals of minority characters did indeed become more nuanced and FairForItsDay (compare ''Film/{{Stagecoach}}'' to ''Film/CheyenneAutumn'', ''Cheyenne Autumn'' for example), but Tarantino's words on example) as well as ''Sergeant Rutledge'' (one of the issue have led to no small amount of BrokenBase. first films at the time with an African-American male lead). Was Ford honestly unaware of the racism of ''Birth of a Nation'' (unlikely), or did he simply feel that MoneyDearBoy MoneyDearBoy, or a chance gig to appear in a film by the most respected director of his age was an acceptable reason for appearing in it, or did he actually agree with the film's support of "separate but equal" as Quentin contends?contends? [[note]]It should be noted Creator/DWGriffith was widely admired and respected by people of different political beliefs in his day, even by the likes of Creator/OrsonWelles and Creator/NicholasRay who were more openly anti-racist than others of their generation. The film fraternity generally respected Griffith for his technical achievements and saw "Birth of a Nation" as a landmark for the motion picture industry[[/note]].
29th Jul '15 2:28:15 PM RushLimborg
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While Quentin Tarantino may have been the first to publiclly call attention to this issue, the issue nonetheless still exists; further, if tropes about crators' lives are to be removed, we mus also remove the Moment Of Awesome concerning Ford and the Red Scare.
29th Jul '15 2:26:11 PM RushLimborg
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Added DiffLines:
* AlternateCharacterInterpretation: Creator/QuentinTarantino has notably pointed to Ford's portrayal of a Klansman in ''Film/BirthOfANation''--and never seeming to have regretted it (to the point where Ford himself was often the one to bring it up)--as a MoralEventHorizon of sorts. As his career progressed, Ford's portrayals of minority characters did indeed become more nuanced and FairForItsDay (compare ''Film/{{Stagecoach}}'' to ''Film/CheyenneAutumn'', for example), but Tarantino's words on the issue have led to no small amount of BrokenBase. Was Ford honestly unaware of the racism of ''Birth of a Nation'' (unlikely), or did he simply feel that MoneyDearBoy was an acceptable reason for appearing in it, or did he actually agree with the film's support of "separate but equal" as Quentin contends?
28th Jul '15 8:23:42 PM JulianLapostat
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This is YMMV, I am skeptical of troping people's lives, even moreso on an issue which only one person has introduced and absolutely no one else before QT.
* AlternateCharacterInterpretation: Creator/QuentinTarantino has notably pointed to Ford's portrayal of a Klansman in ''Film/BirthOfANation''--and never seeming to have regretted it (to the point where Ford himself was often the one to bring it up)--as a MoralEventHorizon of sorts. As his career progressed, Ford's portrayals of minority characters did indeed become more nuanced and FairForItsDay (compare ''Film/{{Stagecoach}}'' to ''Film/CheyenneAutumn'', for example), but Tarantino's words on the issue have led to no small amount of BrokenBase. Was Ford honestly unaware of the racism of ''Birth of a Nation'' (unlikely), or did he simply feel that MoneyDearBoy was an acceptable reason for appearing in it, or did he actually agree with the film's support of "separate but equal" as Quentin contends?
28th Jul '15 8:12:24 PM RushLimborg
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* AlternateCharacterInterpretation: Creator/QuentinTarantino has notably pointed to Ford's portrayal of a Klansman in ''Film/BirthOfANation''--and never seeming to have regretted it (to the point where Ford himself was often the one to bring it up)--as a MoralEventHorizon of sorts. As his career progressed, Ford's portrayals of minority characters did indeed become more nuanced and FairForItsDay (compare ''Film/{{Stagecoach}}'' to ''Film/CheyenneAutumn'', for example), but Tarantino's words on the issue have led to no small amount of BrokenBase. Was Ford honestly unaware of the racism of ''Birth of a Nation'' (unlikely), or did he simply feel that MoneyDearBoy was an acceptable reason for starring in it, or did he actually agree with the film's support of "separate but equal" as Quentin contends?
to:
* AlternateCharacterInterpretation: Creator/QuentinTarantino has notably pointed to Ford's portrayal of a Klansman in ''Film/BirthOfANation''--and never seeming to have regretted it (to the point where Ford himself was often the one to bring it up)--as a MoralEventHorizon of sorts. As his career progressed, Ford's portrayals of minority characters did indeed become more nuanced and FairForItsDay (compare ''Film/{{Stagecoach}}'' to ''Film/CheyenneAutumn'', for example), but Tarantino's words on the issue have led to no small amount of BrokenBase. Was Ford honestly unaware of the racism of ''Birth of a Nation'' (unlikely), or did he simply feel that MoneyDearBoy was an acceptable reason for starring appearing in it, or did he actually agree with the film's support of "separate but equal" as Quentin contends?
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