History YMMV / Frasier

12th May '16 11:30:26 AM DrakeClawfang
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* FamilyUnfriendlyAesop: Several episodes take Frasier's RousseauWasRight belief and pointedly disprove it. A man who steals Frasier's identity turns him over to the police after an IgnoredEpiphany; Bulldog uses his mother as a shield against a (believed but not really) gunman after turning down pointed opportunities from Frasier to confess that he is not a hero; and Lilith's con artist brother Blaine fakes a disability and religious conversion to swindle innocent people and Frasier out of thousands, and gets away with it. These episodes and others with similar stories seem to say that bad people really don't change and aren't really good deep down, and if they suffer karmic retribution or not for their misdeeds is up to chance.

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* FamilyUnfriendlyAesop: Several episodes take Frasier's RousseauWasRight belief and pointedly disprove it. A man who steals Frasier's identity turns him over to the police after an IgnoredEpiphany; Bulldog uses his mother as a shield against a (believed but not really) gunman after turning down pointed opportunities from Frasier to confess that he is not a hero; and Lilith's con artist brother Blaine fakes a disability and religious conversion to swindle innocent people and Frasier out of thousands, and gets away with it.it; and when the two meet their childhood bullies grown up, one is repentant for how he treated them but the other laughs about it and feels no guilt at all. These episodes and others with similar stories seem to say that bad people really don't change and aren't really good deep down, and if they suffer karmic retribution or not for their misdeeds is up to chance.
12th May '16 11:26:54 AM DrakeClawfang
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* FamilyUnfriendlyAesop: Several episodes take Frasier's RousseauWasRight belief and pointedly disprove it. A man who steals Frasier's identity turns him over to the police after an IgnoredEpiphany; Bulldog uses his mother as a shield against a (believed but not really) gunman after turning down pointed opportunities from Frasier to confess that he is not a hero; and Lilith's con artist brother Blaine fakes a disability and religious conversion to swindle innocent people and Frasier out of thousands, and gets away with it. These episodes and others with similar stories seem to say that bad people really don't change and aren't really good deep down, and if they suffer karmic retribution or not for their misdeeds is up to chance.
6th Apr '16 3:10:01 AM shamblingdead2
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** Frasier. He's often played for laughs as an UnsympatheticComedyProtagonist, but take a look at his life. He (and his brother, for the record), was horribly bullied throughout his childhood, had a father who disapproved of pretty much everything he was ever interested in, a mother who, from what we could see in ''Cheers'', was a natural liar and at least somewhat emotionally manipulative. By the end of the series, not only does he have 3 very painful broken marriages/almost marriages under his belt, but a string of hostile rejections from multiple women in Seattle, and all of the various humiliations or setbacks that plague him at various points in the series. He brings some of them down on himself but it's no wonder he lies and panics so much in new relationships, considering all of the esteem shattering situations he's been through.

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** Frasier. He's often played for laughs as an UnsympatheticComedyProtagonist, but take a look at his life. He (and his brother, for the record), was horribly bullied throughout his childhood, had a father who disapproved of pretty much everything he was ever interested in, a mother who, from what we could see in ''Cheers'', was a natural liar and at least somewhat emotionally manipulative. By the end of the series, not only does he have 3 very painful broken marriages/almost marriages under his belt, but a string of hostile rejections from multiple women in Seattle, and all of the various humiliations or setbacks that plague him at various points in the series. He brings some of them down on himself but it's no wonder he lies and panics so much in new relationships, considering all of the esteem shattering situations he's been through. All of this, by the way, while constantly listening to other people's problems and supporting his friends and family emotionally and (apparently) financially without so much as a thank you in return. It's a wonder he never went postal.



*** The first scene of Donny after Daphne and Niles get together, Frasier finds him sitting in the dark in his office, despondant and talking to the groom from his wedding cake, who he's named "Mr. Chump". He furthermore tells Frasier he doesn't hate Daphne for what happened, but he weakly jokes that as a lawyer, suing people is just his knee-jerk reaction to handling problems. While Frasier's confession of his hand in the events gets his riled up, the scene makes it clear that he was thrown into a HeroicBSOD by what happened and just doesn't know how to handle it.
*** The group runs into him a few more times after that. The first time, he's getting married to another woman, claiming that it's true love and he's happy. The next time we see him, he's with a different women, with the implication that he and the first one are already divorced. When he witnesses (what he thinks) is Niles and Daphne breaking up, he goes on a long, angry speech about how Niles knows how it feels to be dumped by the love of your life and "good luck trying to find someone just as good ''because she just ain't out there''." He then turns around and realizes that he's said this right in front of his new girlfriend.
* WTHCastingAgency - Saul Rubinek-- older, schlubby, not particularly attractive --was an odd choice for Donny Douglas. The character was written to be nice and sweet, but Daphne had shown in the past the ability to draw younger and more desireable men, so it wasn't obvious why he in particular would have been able to win her over. Many fans wondered why they didn't choose a younger, handsomer actor, to make Donny's primary detractions his coarseness and lack of sophistication, to contrast more with Niles and to demonstrate what he might have that Niles might not.

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*** The first scene of Donny after Daphne and Niles get together, Frasier finds him sitting in the dark in his office, despondant and talking to the groom from his wedding cake, who he's named "Mr. Chump". He furthermore tells Frasier he doesn't hate Daphne for what happened, but he weakly jokes that as a (GREAT) lawyer, suing people is just his knee-jerk reaction to handling problems. While Frasier's confession of his hand in the events gets his riled up, the scene makes it clear that he was thrown into a HeroicBSOD by what happened and just doesn't know how to handle it.
*** The group runs into him a few more times after that. The first time, he's getting married to another woman, claiming that it's true love and he's happy. The next time we see him, he's with a different women, woman, with the implication that he and the first one are already divorced. When he witnesses (what he thinks) is Niles and Daphne breaking up, he goes on a long, angry speech about how Niles knows how it feels to be dumped by the love of your life and "good luck trying to find someone just as good ''because she just ain't out there''." He then turns around and realizes that he's said this right in front of his new girlfriend.
* WTHCastingAgency - Saul Rubinek-- older, schlubby, not particularly attractive --was an odd choice for Donny Douglas. The character was written to be nice and sweet, but Daphne had shown in the past the ability to draw younger and more desireable desirable men, so it wasn't obvious why he in particular would have been able to win her over. Many fans wondered why they didn't choose a younger, handsomer actor, to make Donny's primary detractions his coarseness and lack of sophistication, to contrast more with Niles and to demonstrate what he might have that Niles might not.
4th Apr '16 7:52:16 AM AnotherGuy
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* FollowTheLeader / {{Homage}}: The show takes many of its visual cues and dialog from ''Film/HannahAndHerSisters''.
16th Jan '16 11:49:41 PM Tidal_Wave_17
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** One episode has a boy call in the show asking for advice because he was being bullied for being smart. Frasier's advice is basically "Just hang on, because one day you'll be more successful than them". The kid condescendingly points out that his advice isn't helpful, at which point an annoyed Frasier says that if any of the boy's classmates are listening, they should beat him up. A few things: A) Yes, the boy was rude, but Frasier really didn't give him any useful advice on how to deal with the bullying, B) he's an adult telling children to beat up another child, and C) he himself was bullied for being too smart as a kid, so he comes off as a blatant hypocrite. And the entire scene is PlayedForLaughs.
12th Jan '16 2:06:45 AM ApeAccount
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** In ''Head Game'' when Frasier asks Niles to fill in for him on his show, Niles makes a remark that "I couldn't presume to fill those big floppy red shoes of yours." This episode aired on the 12th of November 1996. On the 23rd of February 1997, the Simpsons episode "Brother from Another Series" aired in which Kelsey Grammar played Sideshow Bob and David Hyde Peirce portrayed Bob's brother Cecil (as a clear and hilarious reference to their roles on Frasier). A key focus of their relationship in the episode was Cecil's jealousy over Bob's success as a clown's assistant (which had actually been Cecil's dream) which included wearing big floppy red shoes.

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** In ''Head Game'' when Frasier asks Niles to fill in for him on his show, Niles makes a remark that "I couldn't presume to fill those big floppy red shoes of yours." This episode aired on the 12th of November 1996. On the 23rd of February 1997, the Simpsons episode "Brother from Another Series" aired in which Kelsey Grammar played Sideshow Bob and David Hyde Peirce portrayed Bob's brother Cecil (as a clear and hilarious reference to their roles on Frasier). A key focus of their relationship in the episode was Cecil's jealousy over Bob's success as a clown's assistant (which had actually been Cecil's dream) which included wearing big floppy red shoes.shoes (though, as a technical point, the shoes weren't actually that floppy on Bob due to his having been established as having unusually large feet).
12th Jan '16 2:05:26 AM ApeAccount
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** In ''Head Game'' when Frasier asks Niles to fill in for him on his show, Niles makes a remark that "I couldn't presume to fill those big floppy red shoes of yours." This episode aired on the 12th of November 1996. On the 23rd of February 1997, the Simpsons episode "Brother from Another Series" aired in which Kelsey Grammar played Sideshow Bob and David Hyde Peirce portrayed Bob's brother Cecil (as a clear and hilarious reference to their roles on Frasier). A key focus of their relationship in the episode was Cecil's jealousy over Bob's success as a clown's assistant (which had actually been Cecil's dream) which included wearing big floppy red shoes.
11th Jan '16 2:58:39 AM ApeAccount
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* StrawmanHasAPoint: In "Room Full of Heroes", Niles begins to say, in-character as Martin, that he and Frasier were disappointments to him. Martin sharply cuts him off and says he's portraying him as a "drunken judgmental jackass." While Niles was certainly over the line and had indeed had a few beers, considering how Martin treats the two of them and routinely expresses exasperation about their behavior, it's hard not to see why Niles would think this way.

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* StrawmanHasAPoint: In "Room Full of Heroes", Niles begins to say, in-character as Martin, that he and Frasier were disappointments to him. Martin sharply cuts him off and says he's portraying him as a "drunken judgmental jackass." While Niles was certainly over the line and had indeed had a few beers, considering how Martin treats the two of them and routinely expresses exasperation about their behavior, it's hard not to see why Niles would think this way.way (as an example, in “You Can't Tell a Crook by His Cover” when Frasier asked him if he believed in second chances Martin’s response was “I did, but then we had Niles.”).
3rd Nov '15 4:07:21 PM worldbreaker
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*** Not only undone but the new writers went out of their way to savagely deconstruct her and Frasier's relationship till Frasier broke things off with her in one episode.
26th Oct '15 11:29:06 PM PriceCheck
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*** From Season 3, an in-universe example: "Flesh is burning, duh-duh-duh-duh-duh-duh." Daphne complains she'll have it in her head all day. The next scene, we see her singing it as she does chores, and then Martin comes out of the kitchen singing it.

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*** From Season 3, an in-universe example: "Flesh is burning, duh-duh-duh-duh-duh-duh.nuh-nuh-nuh-nuh-nuh-nuh." Daphne complains she'll have it in her head all day. The next scene, we see her singing it as she does chores, and then Martin comes out of the kitchen singing it.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=YMMV.Frasier