History YMMV / FinalFantasyVI

21st Sep '17 8:28:11 AM Lego3400
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** Gogo seems designed to grow them. S/he could be Relm's mother, Baram, Banon, or Senator Adlai Stevenson.
* FamilyUnfriendlyAesop: Cid telling Celes that the other survivors, overcome by depression, would take a leap of faith from a cliff and it "perked them right up!". So if you're depressed, jumping off of a cliff is the best way to cheer yourself up.

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** Gogo seems designed to grow them. S/he could be Relm's mother, Baram, Banon, or Senator Adlai Stevenson.
Stevenson.... Or More Likely the boss, Great Mime Gogo, of FinalFantasyV with the same name who cast himself into the void upon defeat, VI!Gogo's ablities even work like the Mime Job V!Gogo was guarding (FFV was not released outside Japan till long after VI, known elsewhere as FFIII, thus many players at the time did not catch the references.
* FamilyUnfriendlyAesop: Cid telling Celes that the other survivors, overcome by depression, would take a leap of faith from a cliff and it "perked them right up!". So if you're depressed, jumping off of a cliff is the best way to cheer yourself up. This was fixed in the GBA version, where the script makes no effort to hide the fact that he was telling her that the others killed themselves on that cliff.



** Many fans believe that the Gogo that appears in this game is the same Gogo from ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyV'', as the end of his [[WaitingPuzzle "fight"]] ends with him throwing himself into the Void, and Gilgamesh, who debuted in that game, canonically travels through the different games through the power of the Void.

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** Many fans believe that the Gogo that appears in this game is the same Gogo from ''VideoGame/FinalFantasyV'', as the end of his [[WaitingPuzzle "fight"]] ends with him throwing himself into the Void, and Gilgamesh, who debuted in that game, canonically travels through the different games through the power of the Void. He also works the same way as that game's Mime Job
14th Sep '17 12:43:02 PM rixion
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* AlternativeCharacterInterpretation:
** Locke Cole: star-crossed lover or incredibly creepy man who's so fraught with attachment issues that he keeps his dead girlfriend preserved in a crazy old man's basement? The creepiness is lessened when it's revealed [[spoiler:Locke planned to use the Phoenix Esper to revive Rachel]].
** Gestahl's reactions to your behavior at the imperial banquet offer a lot of ways to interpret his character. Toasting the Empire or the Returners, it's obvious there which he'd prefer, but "To our hometowns!" gets the best reaction, particularly interesting since Vector ''is'' his home. Is he approving of your choice because he appreciates you're fighting to defend your homes, or because he's already planning to abandon the remaining Imperials and take power on his own? The best reaction to the question of Celes' loyalties is to declare total trust of her. Is he pleased you trust an ally and didn't turn on them because of what Kefka said, or does he think you're foolish for trusting her so easily after all that she's done and that means his next plan will go well?
** Terra, is her Esper form just a simple transformation, or does the Esper have its own will and mind separate from the human side? In the case of the latter, is it an entirely different person from Terra, or just another side of her personality?
** Kefka: Destroys everything he can because he thinks it's fun and believes love and friendship are just temporary diversions from the inevitability of death, or a ''very'' dark WoobieDestroyerOfWorlds so twisted by Magitek experiments that he actually can't feel love and friendship anymore and destroys because it's all that gives meaning to his life now? ''VideoGame/DissidiaFinalFantasy'' actually nudges towards the latter, with one of Kefka's iconic nihilistic speeches being voiced with a very sorrowful and melancholy tone...only for the prequel to nudge back towards the former where he's a shining ManipulativeBastard. Chronologically, ''Dissidia'' shows him becoming more pitiful in death than he ever was in life. One thing that can't be denied is that, monster or woobie, Kefka's a mad dog whose very existence and reason for living run counterpoint to the world he exists in.
** UpToEleven with the entire group of the Returners! At one point early on, Edgar tells Terra that they would be [[NotSoDifferent no different than the Empire]] if they pushed her too hard to fight for the Returners' cause. Internet debates have continued to rage as to whether or not the Returners were still using and manipulating Terra, whether they cared to admit it or not.

to:

* AlternativeCharacterInterpretation:
** Locke Cole: star-crossed lover or incredibly creepy man who's so fraught with attachment issues that he keeps his dead girlfriend preserved in a crazy old man's basement? The creepiness is lessened when it's revealed [[spoiler:Locke planned to use the Phoenix Esper to revive Rachel]].
** Gestahl's reactions to your behavior at the imperial banquet offer a lot of ways to interpret his character. Toasting the Empire or the Returners, it's obvious there which he'd prefer, but "To our hometowns!" gets the best reaction, particularly interesting since Vector ''is'' his home. Is he approving of your choice because he appreciates you're fighting to defend your homes, or because he's already planning to abandon the remaining Imperials and take power on his own? The best reaction to the question of Celes' loyalties is to declare total trust of her. Is he pleased you trust an ally and didn't turn on them because of what Kefka said, or does he think you're foolish for trusting her so easily after all that she's done and that means his next plan will go well?
** Terra, is her Esper form just a simple transformation, or does the Esper have its own will and mind separate from the human side? In the case of the latter, is it an entirely different person from Terra, or just another side of her personality?
** Kefka: Destroys everything he can because he thinks it's fun and believes love and friendship are just temporary diversions from the inevitability of death, or a ''very'' dark WoobieDestroyerOfWorlds so twisted by Magitek experiments that he actually can't feel love and friendship anymore and destroys because it's all that gives meaning to his life now? ''VideoGame/DissidiaFinalFantasy'' actually nudges towards the latter, with one of Kefka's iconic nihilistic speeches being voiced with a very sorrowful and melancholy tone...only for the prequel to nudge back towards the former where he's a shining ManipulativeBastard. Chronologically, ''Dissidia'' shows him becoming more pitiful in death than he ever was in life. One thing that can't be denied is that, monster or woobie, Kefka's a mad dog whose very existence and reason for living run counterpoint to the world he exists in.
** UpToEleven with the entire group of the Returners! At one point early on, Edgar tells Terra that they would be [[NotSoDifferent no different than the Empire]] if they pushed her too hard to fight for the Returners' cause. Internet debates have continued to rage as to whether or not the Returners were still using and manipulating Terra, whether they cared to admit it or not.
AlternateCharacterInterpretation: [[AlternativeCharacterInterpretation/FinalFantasy Here.]]
12th Sep '17 9:06:42 PM Ronfar
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** The Cultists' Tower is difficult on its own, but two of its' denizens in particular are tough to deal with. L.20 Magics love to cast Banish/X-Zone, which is an instant death attack that ignores the reflect rings you'll be wearing. If you get in a fight with more than one of them and they cast Banish multiple times in a row, you're staring a Game Over in the face. It doesn't help that they have inherent Reflect status, and no elemental weaknesses to take advantage of. Then there's L.90 Magics. They cast two damage spells, Meteor and Merton/Meltdown, , found in the very same dungeon, the Cultists' Tower. They use Meteor and Merton/Meltdown, which likewise cut through your Reflect Rings and will likely kill you if you don't cast Stop or Bserk/Berserk on them. The problem? Both Stop and Bserk are reflectable, and Level 90 Magic has inherent Reflect status too! The other problem? Meltdown damages everything in a battle, friend or foe, but the L.90 Magics absorb both fire and wind elemental, so Meltdown heals them!

to:

** The Cultists' Tower is difficult on its own, but two of its' denizens in particular are tough to deal with. L.20 Magics love to cast Banish/X-Zone, which is an instant death attack that ignores the reflect rings you'll be wearing. If you get in a fight with more than one of them and they cast Banish multiple times in a row, you're staring a Game Over in the face. It doesn't help that they have inherent Reflect status, and no elemental weaknesses to take advantage of. Then there's L.90 Magics. They cast two damage spells, Meteor and Merton/Meltdown, , found in the very same dungeon, the Cultists' Tower. They use Meteor and Merton/Meltdown, which likewise cut through your Reflect Rings and will likely kill you if you don't cast Stop or Bserk/Berserk on them. The problem? Both Stop and Bserk are reflectable, and Level 90 Magic has inherent Reflect status too! The other problem? Meltdown damages everything in a battle, friend or foe, but the L.90 Magics absorb both fire and wind elemental, so Meltdown heals them!



*** The Retainer. A relatively inconspicuous foe, low HP, only uses physical attacks and Wind Slash...then you kill it. When it dies, it ''always'' uses Tradeoff on the party member that dealt the final blow, inflicting Instant Death. It can be blocked like a physical blow fortunately, so hope you have high Evasion (or Mblock on SNES or PSX) because it ignores Instant Death protection.

to:

*** The Retainer. A relatively inconspicuous foe, low HP, only uses physical attacks and Wind Slash...then you kill it. When it dies, it ''always'' uses Tradeoff on the party member that dealt the final blow, inflicting Instant Death. It can be blocked like a physical blow blow, fortunately, so hope you have high Evasion (or Mblock on SNES or PSX) because it ignores Instant Death protection.
12th Sep '17 6:41:47 AM rixion
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* GameBreaker: Lots. The game is one of the easiest of the series, and it takes very little effort to make your characters much, much stronger than anything they'll ever have to face.
** Ultima. Hits all enemies, ignores defense, cannot be blocked or reflected, is non-elemental, and has such huge power that it can easily hit the damage cap. The catch with it is that it has a low learn rate from only a couple sources and costs 80 MP, but once you ''do'' learn it and use one of the two ways below to circumvent the MP problem, Ultima will end most enemy encounters in one casting, and anything that might survive probably won't last much longer.
** The magic spell Quick. It lets your character take two more turns without any other enemies or party members able to interrupt them. It costs 99 MP but again, there's ways around that. When combined with the Soul of Thamasa that grants Dualcast, this lets a character cast ''five spells'' in one turn. Combined with Ultima that's five hits of 9999 damage; or if you prefer, a lone character can revive and fully heal the entire party.
** Osmose. For the cost of 1 MP it absorbs MP from an enemy, and has enough power that it'll probably fully restore your MP in one shot. Further, one of the Espers that teaches it does so at a high learn rate. Unless you're fighting undead enemies immune to it, Osmose pretty much solves your party's need for MP-restoring items and eliminates the drawback of high-MP spells.
** The Economizer. A Relic that saps the MP cost of all magic and Lores to 1. 'nuff said.
** The Master's Scroll and Genji Glove combination allows a character to attack eight times at once. Get them a defense-ignoring weapon or two (or just train their Strength really high) and ''anything'' they hit will die in one turn as they attack a total of eight times dealing 9999 damage with each hit. Teach them Quick and they can do it twice in a row every turn. Even Kaiser Dragon and Omega Weapon won't last long against such power.
** Not using a full party. The game is designed assuming that you are always using the maximum number of characters available, but using fewer characters when you have the option makes the game much easier. This is because XP is divided between party members. With only 1 or 2 characters, they'll gain XP much faster than intended and quickly reach the level where they can one shot every encounter. And since the game periodically bumps up characters to the party average, all of your unused characters will eventually end up at a much higher level than they would have been if you had actually used them in battle. Using say, Sabin and Celes only trivializes almost the entire game.
** In the SNES version, it was possible to kill any enemy, including bosses (except for [[FinalBoss the game-ending boss]]), by casting Vanish on said enemy and then casting Doom (now Death) or X-Zone (now Banish). This was because the Invisibility status effect (which Vanish causes) makes it impossible for spells to "Miss". And, for some strange reason, "instant death" wasn't actually included as part of the standard ContractualBossImmunity to status ailments - they had a 100% chance of dodging them, but if you somehow managed to get the spell to connect in spite of this, it would indeed work.
** Gau is this throughout most of the game [[GuideDangIt if you know]] [[MagikarpPower which Rages are worth getting]] and [[SituationalSword where to use them]]. Used right, he's capable of [[OneHitKill one-]] or two-shotting many bosses and carrying the rest of the party through what would otherwise be ThatOneLevel with no problem.
*** In the endgame, the aptly nicknamed Wind God Gau. Equip him with the Offering, Merit Award, and Cyan's Tempest, and use the Stray Cat Rage. Gau will attack four times each turn, possibly at 8x normal power for each attack, ''and'' has a chance of casting Wind Slash each attack to hit all enemies, Wind Slash also having 8x normal power. This trick no longer works in the GBA re-release, as Gau and Gogo can no longer use the Merit Award that lets them equip the Tempest.
*** If you want to play a little more defensively, have Gau Rage Magic Urn instead of Stray Cat to get immunity to everything in the book except non-elemental magic, and his 50% chance of casting Curaga on himself will fix any damage that gets dealt.
*** Or you can have him Rage Rafflesia/Nightshade, whose Charm spell acts as a Confuse status that cannot be cured, and no boss in the game is immune to it. Did we mention that Gogo can also use Rage, for double the gamebreaking fun? Because they can!
** A bug in the SNES version causes the [=MBlock=] (Magic Evasion) stat to determine a character's chances of blocking both physical attacks and magical attacks. A lot of weapons and relics increase [=MBlock=], making it fairly simple to raise [=MBlock=] to 127%, at which point any attack, magical or physical, that can be blocked probably will.
** Some characters can have their Defense stat raised all the way to 255, when physical blows will do a single point of damage in the front row. In the back, it does ''zero''.
** The GBA version allows you to save your game after being the FinalBoss and pick up after. It so happens that two enemies in the final battle have the Ultima Weapon and the Lightbringer as steals, meaning you can farm the best weapons in the game for an infinite supply of them.
** {{Dragoon}} Boots + Dragon Horn + Holy Lance turns Edgar or Mog into a bouncing engine of destruction capable of dealing obscene amounts of damage to multiple targets from the back row. Not that defense matters much since they'll be spending most of the battle offscreen and unable to be targeted.
** On the Lete River, there's a sequence where the player can loop around endlessly, fighting enemies. Your party includes Banon, who can cast Cure 2 on the party for no MP cost. Set the cursor to memory to keep him casting it, get a Turbo-fire controller, and watch as your party fights enemies again and again to slowly power level with little player involvement and risk. The age of emulators make it even easier with speed-up commands to level grind hours worth of battles in a couple of minutes. Strictly speaking for MinMaxing, this is a terrible idea as it limits the stat boosts your party will get later in the game once you get Espers, but if you don't care about that, having everyone at level 20 or so will make the game up to at least the Floating Continent a snap.
*** In the SNES version, whenever you get a party wipe you instantly go back to the last place you saved with all your levels intact for whoever you had in your party at the time who is still there. This means you can save in the Narshe mines when Terra, Wedge, and Biggs invade it, progress from there without saving as far as you can, then whenever you lose or just let yourself die to get to a certain level, and you could end up with say level 20 Terra at the start of the game. Plus, since the level of party members is determined by the level of the highest level party member when they first join, this also means you can just focus on leveling up Terra to level your entire party up to about the same level all at the same time much faster than trying to do so normally. Doesn't work in the PS1 version due to different save mechanics.

to:

* GameBreaker: Lots. The game is one of the easiest of the series, and it takes very little effort to make your characters much, much stronger than anything they'll ever have to face.
** Ultima. Hits all enemies, ignores defense, cannot be blocked or reflected, is non-elemental, and has such huge power that it can easily hit the damage cap. The catch with it is that it has a low learn rate from only a couple sources and costs 80 MP, but once you ''do'' learn it and use one of the two ways below to circumvent the MP problem, Ultima will end most enemy encounters in one casting, and anything that might survive probably won't last much longer.
** The magic spell Quick. It lets your character take two more turns without any other enemies or party members able to interrupt them. It costs 99 MP but again, there's ways around that. When combined with the Soul of Thamasa that grants Dualcast, this lets a character cast ''five spells'' in one turn. Combined with Ultima that's five hits of 9999 damage; or if you prefer, a lone character can revive and fully heal the entire party.
** Osmose. For the cost of 1 MP it absorbs MP from an enemy, and has enough power that it'll probably fully restore your MP in one shot. Further, one of the Espers that teaches it does so at a high learn rate. Unless you're fighting undead enemies immune to it, Osmose pretty much solves your party's need for MP-restoring items and eliminates the drawback of high-MP spells.
** The Economizer. A Relic that saps the MP cost of all magic and Lores to 1. 'nuff said.
** The Master's Scroll and Genji Glove combination allows a character to attack eight times at once. Get them a defense-ignoring weapon or two (or just train their Strength really high) and ''anything'' they hit will die in one turn as they attack a total of eight times dealing 9999 damage with each hit. Teach them Quick and they can do it twice in a row every turn. Even Kaiser Dragon and Omega Weapon won't last long against such power.
** Not using a full party. The game is designed assuming that you are always using the maximum number of characters available, but using fewer characters when you have the option makes the game much easier. This is because XP is divided between party members. With only 1 or 2 characters, they'll gain XP much faster than intended and quickly reach the level where they can one shot every encounter. And since the game periodically bumps up characters to the party average, all of your unused characters will eventually end up at a much higher level than they would have been if you had actually used them in battle. Using say, Sabin and Celes only trivializes almost the entire game.
** In the SNES version, it was possible to kill any enemy, including bosses (except for [[FinalBoss the game-ending boss]]), by casting Vanish on said enemy and then casting Doom (now Death) or X-Zone (now Banish). This was because the Invisibility status effect (which Vanish causes) makes it impossible for spells to "Miss". And, for some strange reason, "instant death" wasn't actually included as part of the standard ContractualBossImmunity to status ailments - they had a 100% chance of dodging them, but if you somehow managed to get the spell to connect in spite of this, it would indeed work.
** Gau is this throughout most of the game [[GuideDangIt if you know]] [[MagikarpPower which Rages are worth getting]] and [[SituationalSword where to use them]]. Used right, he's capable of [[OneHitKill one-]] or two-shotting many bosses and carrying the rest of the party through what would otherwise be ThatOneLevel with no problem.
*** In the endgame, the aptly nicknamed Wind God Gau. Equip him with the Offering, Merit Award, and Cyan's Tempest, and use the Stray Cat Rage. Gau will attack four times each turn, possibly at 8x normal power for each attack, ''and'' has a chance of casting Wind Slash each attack to hit all enemies, Wind Slash also having 8x normal power. This trick no longer works in the GBA re-release, as Gau and Gogo can no longer use the Merit Award that lets them equip the Tempest.
*** If you want to play a little more defensively, have Gau Rage Magic Urn instead of Stray Cat to get immunity to everything in the book except non-elemental magic, and his 50% chance of casting Curaga on himself will fix any damage that gets dealt.
*** Or you can have him Rage Rafflesia/Nightshade, whose Charm spell acts as a Confuse status that cannot be cured, and no boss in the game is immune to it. Did we mention that Gogo can also use Rage, for double the gamebreaking fun? Because they can!
** A bug in the SNES version causes the [=MBlock=] (Magic Evasion) stat to determine a character's chances of blocking both physical attacks and magical attacks. A lot of weapons and relics increase [=MBlock=], making it fairly simple to raise [=MBlock=] to 127%, at which point any attack, magical or physical, that can be blocked probably will.
** Some characters can have their Defense stat raised all the way to 255, when physical blows will do a single point of damage in the front row. In the back, it does ''zero''.
** The GBA version allows you to save your game after being the FinalBoss and pick up after. It so happens that two enemies in the final battle have the Ultima Weapon and the Lightbringer as steals, meaning you can farm the best weapons in the game for an infinite supply of them.
** {{Dragoon}} Boots + Dragon Horn + Holy Lance turns Edgar or Mog into a bouncing engine of destruction capable of dealing obscene amounts of damage to multiple targets from the back row. Not that defense matters much since they'll be spending most of the battle offscreen and unable to be targeted.
** On the Lete River, there's a sequence where the player can loop around endlessly, fighting enemies. Your party includes Banon, who can cast Cure 2 on the party for no MP cost. Set the cursor to memory to keep him casting it, get a Turbo-fire controller, and watch as your party fights enemies again and again to slowly power level with little player involvement and risk. The age of emulators make it even easier with speed-up commands to level grind hours worth of battles in a couple of minutes. Strictly speaking for MinMaxing, this is a terrible idea as it limits the stat boosts your party will get later in the game once you get Espers, but if you don't care about that, having everyone at level 20 or so will make the game up to at least the Floating Continent a snap.
*** In the SNES version, whenever you get a party wipe you instantly go back to the last place you saved with all your levels intact for whoever you had in your party at the time who is still there. This means you can save in the Narshe mines when Terra, Wedge, and Biggs invade it, progress from there without saving as far as you can, then whenever you lose or just let yourself die to get to a certain level, and you could end up with say level 20 Terra at the start of the game. Plus, since the level of party members is determined by the level of the highest level party member when they first join, this also means you can just focus on leveling up Terra to level your entire party up to about the same level all at the same time much faster than trying to do so normally. Doesn't work in the PS1 version due to different save mechanics.
[[GameBreaker/FinalFantasy Here]].
29th Aug '17 9:31:26 AM Nopperabo
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Added DiffLines:

* FoeYay: Kefka takes delight in Terra's destructive magical abilities, but it's not hard to interpret his delight as sexual attraction. In Terra's flashback, Kefka gleefully announces "You're all mine!" when he places the Slave Crown on her head. In ''Dissidia'', Kefka's line to Terra -- "Time to come home to Papa!" -- could also be interpreted as a sign of his attraction to her. Fan art depicting Kefka and Terra together is easy to find.
25th Aug '17 9:26:13 PM randomtroper89
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** Kefka: Destroys everything he can because he thinks it's fun and believes love and friendship are just temporary diversions from the inevitability of death, or a ''very'' dark WoobieDestroyerOfWorlds so twisted by Magitek experiments that he actually can't feel love and friendship anymore and destroys because it's all that gives meaning to his life now? ''VideoGame/DissidiaFinalFantasy'' actually nudges towards the latter, with one of Kefka's iconic nihilistic speeches being voiced with a very sorrowful and melancholy tone...only for the prequel to nudge back towards the former where he's a shining ManipulativeBastard.

to:

** Kefka: Destroys everything he can because he thinks it's fun and believes love and friendship are just temporary diversions from the inevitability of death, or a ''very'' dark WoobieDestroyerOfWorlds so twisted by Magitek experiments that he actually can't feel love and friendship anymore and destroys because it's all that gives meaning to his life now? ''VideoGame/DissidiaFinalFantasy'' actually nudges towards the latter, with one of Kefka's iconic nihilistic speeches being voiced with a very sorrowful and melancholy tone...only for the prequel to nudge back towards the former where he's a shining ManipulativeBastard. Chronologically, ''Dissidia'' shows him becoming more pitiful in death than he ever was in life. One thing that can't be denied is that, monster or woobie, Kefka's a mad dog whose very existence and reason for living run counterpoint to the world he exists in.



*** Chronologically, ''Dissidia'' shows him becoming more pitiful in death than he ever was in life. One thing that can't be denied is that, monster or woobie, Kefka's a mad dog whose very existence and reason for living run counterpoint to the world he exists in.
25th Aug '17 9:22:07 PM randomtroper89
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* AlternativeCharacterInterpretation: Locke Cole: star-crossed lover or incredibly creepy man who's so fraught with attachment issues that he keeps his dead girlfriend preserved in a crazy old man's basement? The creepiness is lessened when it's revealed [[spoiler:Locke planned to use the Phoenix Esper to revive Rachel]].

to:

* AlternativeCharacterInterpretation: AlternativeCharacterInterpretation:
**
Locke Cole: star-crossed lover or incredibly creepy man who's so fraught with attachment issues that he keeps his dead girlfriend preserved in a crazy old man's basement? The creepiness is lessened when it's revealed [[spoiler:Locke planned to use the Phoenix Esper to revive Rachel]].Rachel]].
** Gestahl's reactions to your behavior at the imperial banquet offer a lot of ways to interpret his character. Toasting the Empire or the Returners, it's obvious there which he'd prefer, but "To our hometowns!" gets the best reaction, particularly interesting since Vector ''is'' his home. Is he approving of your choice because he appreciates you're fighting to defend your homes, or because he's already planning to abandon the remaining Imperials and take power on his own? The best reaction to the question of Celes' loyalties is to declare total trust of her. Is he pleased you trust an ally and didn't turn on them because of what Kefka said, or does he think you're foolish for trusting her so easily after all that she's done and that means his next plan will go well?
** Terra, is her Esper form just a simple transformation, or does the Esper have its own will and mind separate from the human side? In the case of the latter, is it an entirely different person from Terra, or just another side of her personality?
** Kefka: Destroys everything he can because he thinks it's fun and believes love and friendship are just temporary diversions from the inevitability of death, or a ''very'' dark WoobieDestroyerOfWorlds so twisted by Magitek experiments that he actually can't feel love and friendship anymore and destroys because it's all that gives meaning to his life now? ''VideoGame/DissidiaFinalFantasy'' actually nudges towards the latter, with one of Kefka's iconic nihilistic speeches being voiced with a very sorrowful and melancholy tone...only for the prequel to nudge back towards the former where he's a shining ManipulativeBastard.
** UpToEleven with the entire group of the Returners! At one point early on, Edgar tells Terra that they would be [[NotSoDifferent no different than the Empire]] if they pushed her too hard to fight for the Returners' cause. Internet debates have continued to rage as to whether or not the Returners were still using and manipulating Terra, whether they cared to admit it or not.
*** Chronologically, ''Dissidia'' shows him becoming more pitiful in death than he ever was in life. One thing that can't be denied is that, monster or woobie, Kefka's a mad dog whose very existence and reason for living run counterpoint to the world he exists in.



** Gestahl's reactions to your behavior at the imperial banquet offer a lot of ways to interpret his character. Toasting the Empire or the Returners, it's obvious there which he'd prefer, but "To our hometowns!" gets the best reaction, particularly interesting since Vector ''is'' his home. Is he approving of your choice because he appreciates you're fighting to defend your homes, or because he's already planning to abandon the remaining Imperials and take power on his own? The best reaction to the question of Celes' loyalties is to declare total trust of her. Is he pleased you trust an ally and didn't turn on them because of what Kefka said, or does he think you're foolish for trusting her so easily after all that she's done and that means his next plan will go well?



** Non-translation related: Locke Cole: star-crossed lover or incredibly creepy man who's so fraught with attachment issues that he keeps his dead girlfriend preserved in a crazy old man's basement?
*** The creepiness is lessened when it's revealed [[spoiler:Locke planned to use the Phoenix Esper to revive Rachel]].
** Terra, is her Esper form just a simple transformation, or does the Esper have its own will and mind separate from the human side? In the case of the latter, is it an entirely different person from Terra, or just another side of her personality?
** Kefka: Destroys everything he can because he thinks it's fun and believes love and friendship are just temporary diversions from the inevitability of death, or a ''very'' dark WoobieDestroyerOfWorlds so twisted by Magitek experiments that he actually can't feel love and friendship anymore and destroys because it's all that gives meaning to his life now? ''VideoGame/DissidiaFinalFantasy'' actually nudges towards the latter, with one of Kefka's iconic nihilistic speeches being voiced with a very sorrowful and melancholy tone...only for the prequel to nudge back towards the former where he's a shining ManipulativeBastard.
*** Chronologically, ''Dissidia'' shows him becoming more pitiful in death than he ever was in life. One thing that can't be denied is that, monster or woobie, Kefka's a mad dog whose very existence and reason for living run counterpoint to the world he exists in.
*** And then between releases of the original game too. In the Japanese version Kefka was a [[TheFool laughing idiot]] and practically a [[TheScrappy Scrappy]], while in the English version Ted Woolsey made him deeply hateful and cruel while keeping his sense of humor, which made him even darker than if it had been removed.
** UpToEleven with the entire group of the Returners! At one point early on, Edgar tells Terra that they would be [[NotSoDifferent no different than the Empire]] if they pushed her too hard to fight for the Returners' cause. Internet debates have continued to rage as to whether or not the Returners were still using and manipulating Terra, whether they cared to admit it or not.

to:

** Non-translation related: Locke Cole: star-crossed lover or incredibly creepy man who's so fraught with attachment issues that he keeps his dead girlfriend preserved in a crazy old man's basement?
*** The creepiness is lessened when it's revealed [[spoiler:Locke planned to use the Phoenix Esper to revive Rachel]].
** Terra, is her Esper form just a simple transformation, or does the Esper have its own will and mind separate from the human side? In the case of the latter, is it an entirely different person from Terra, or just another side of her personality?
** Kefka: Destroys everything he can because he thinks it's fun and believes love and friendship are just temporary diversions from the inevitability of death, or a ''very'' dark WoobieDestroyerOfWorlds so twisted by Magitek experiments that he actually can't feel love and friendship anymore and destroys because it's all that gives meaning to his life now? ''VideoGame/DissidiaFinalFantasy'' actually nudges towards the latter, with one of Kefka's iconic nihilistic speeches being voiced with a very sorrowful and melancholy tone...only for the prequel to nudge back towards the former where he's a shining ManipulativeBastard.
*** Chronologically, ''Dissidia'' shows him becoming more pitiful in death than he ever was in life. One thing that can't be denied is that, monster or woobie, Kefka's a mad dog whose very existence and reason for living run counterpoint to the world he exists in.
*** And then between releases of the original game too.
In the Japanese version Kefka was a [[TheFool laughing idiot]] and practically a [[TheScrappy Scrappy]], while in the English version Ted Woolsey made him deeply hateful and cruel while keeping his sense of humor, which made him even darker than if it had been removed.
** UpToEleven with the entire group of the Returners! At one point early on, Edgar tells Terra that they would be [[NotSoDifferent no different than the Empire]] if they pushed her too hard to fight for the Returners' cause. Internet debates have continued to rage as to whether or not the Returners were still using and manipulating Terra, whether they cared to admit it or not.
removed.
25th Aug '17 9:17:47 PM randomtroper89
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* AlternativeCharacterInterpretation: The GBA and SNES English releases have different translations. Both were done well, but they end up portraying some characters in distinctly different ways.
** Setzer is probably the character that changed the most. In the SNES translation, Setzer is a happy-go-lucky thrill seeker who JumpedAtTheCall. In the GBA version, he's almost the exact opposite: he's willing to take crazy risks because he's a world-weary nihilist who [[DeathSeeker simply doesn't care whether he lives or dies]], which is why he's always ''gambling'' with his life.
*** Notably, his appearance in VideoGame/KingdomHeartsII seems like a {{Flanderization}} of the first version. It's also possible that ''both'' portrayals are correct and his happy-go-lucky attitude is a bit of {{Stepford|Smiler}}ism.
** Edgar also undergoes changes, most notably in his first interactions with Relm. Originally dismissive of the young child artist, the GBA version has him saying "[[TheJailBaitWait Hope you're still around in eight years]]". You see his flirting on the whole as a sign of [[TheCharmer genuine promiscuity]], a [[BunnyEarsLawyer personality quirk]], or a form of [[ObfuscatingStupidity obfuscation]].
*** According to a non-canon doujinshi written by Soraya Saga (the Figaro character designer), he's got a FreudianExcuse -- his mom died when they were kids so he's drawn to seek female companionship where and however he can.
*** And if you think about it, "hope you're still around in eight years" is a pretty bleak thing to say considering [[PlayerPunch what happened just before he said it]]. The statement carries the implication that she's likely to ''die'' before she reaches adulthood.
*** Edgar doesn't say quite the same thing in the original Japanese version, what he says there is something like "That's just criminal......Don't even think of it." From what I've heard that line is supposedly meant as a joke.
** Gestahl's reactions to your behavior at the imperial banquet offer a lot of ways to interpret his character. Toasting the Empire or the Returners, it's obvious there which he'd prefer, but "To our hometowns!" gets the best reaction, particularly interesting since Vector ''is'' his home. Is he approving of your choice because he appreciates you're fighting to defend your homes, or because he's already planning to abandon the remaining Imperials and take power on his own? The best reaction to the question of Celes' loyalties is to declare total trust of her. Is he pleased you trust an ally and didn't turn on them because of what Kefka said, or does he think you're foolish for trusting her so easily after all that she's done and that means his next plan will go well?
*** Gestahl's final lines are pointedly different between the GBA & original Japanese and SNES versions as well. His GBA and Japanese lines give an EvenEvilHasStandards vibe, but his SNES line shows that he's selfish to the last:
--->'''Gestahl/Gastra:''' ガストラ「恐怖が世界をおおうぞ (Terror will engulf the world...)
--->'''Gestahl (GBA):''' The world is about to learn...the true meaning of fear...
--->'''Gestahl (SNES):''' There'll be no-one to worship us...
** Non-translation related: Locke Cole: star-crossed lover or incredibly creepy man who's so fraught with attachment issues that he keeps his dead girlfriend preserved in a crazy old man's basement?
*** The creepiness is lessened when it's revealed [[spoiler:Locke planned to use the Phoenix Esper to revive Rachel]].
** Terra, is her Esper form just a simple transformation, or does the Esper have its own will and mind separate from the human side? In the case of the latter, is it an entirely different person from Terra, or just another side of her personality?
** Kefka: Destroys everything he can because he thinks it's fun and believes love and friendship are just temporary diversions from the inevitability of death, or a ''very'' dark WoobieDestroyerOfWorlds so twisted by Magitek experiments that he actually can't feel love and friendship anymore and destroys because it's all that gives meaning to his life now? ''VideoGame/DissidiaFinalFantasy'' actually nudges towards the latter, with one of Kefka's iconic nihilistic speeches being voiced with a very sorrowful and melancholy tone...only for the prequel to nudge back towards the former where he's a shining ManipulativeBastard.
*** Chronologically, ''Dissidia'' shows him becoming more pitiful in death than he ever was in life. One thing that can't be denied is that, monster or woobie, Kefka's a mad dog whose very existence and reason for living run counterpoint to the world he exists in.
*** And then between releases of the original game too. In the Japanese version Kefka was a [[TheFool laughing idiot]] and practically a [[TheScrappy Scrappy]], while in the English version Ted Woolsey made him deeply hateful and cruel while keeping his sense of humor, which made him even darker than if it had been removed.
** UpToEleven with the entire group of the Returners! At one point early on, Edgar tells Terra that they would be [[NotSoDifferent no different than the Empire]] if they pushed her too hard to fight for the Returners' cause. Internet debates have continued to rage as to whether or not the Returners were still using and manipulating Terra, whether they cared to admit it or not.
** Atma Weapon/Ultima Buster. Not necessarily the boss itself, but the meaning of its infamous MindScrew pre-battle speech ranges from it believing that the only point to existence [[BloodKnight is to fight]] (hence why it immediately begins attacks after its finished), believing that it [[TheWorldIsNotReady is above humans and that the player characters are unworthy to know]], believing that there [[TheAntiNihilist is no meaning but it choosing to fight the party anyway]] ([[DespairEventHorizon or that there's no meaning to anything period]]), or just being a {{Troll}}.
--> SNES: "I'm Atma... ... Left here since the birth... Forgotten in the river of time... I've had eternity to... Ponder the meaning of things... And now I have an answer..."
--> GBA: "I am the one known as Ultima... Forged an eternity ago and left here... Forgotten in the mists of time... Long have I pondered what I should do... Long, long have I pondered... But now it seems I have an answer..."

to:

* AlternativeCharacterInterpretation: The GBA and SNES English releases have different translations. Both were done well, but they end up portraying some characters in distinctly different ways.
** Setzer is probably the character that changed the most. In the SNES translation, Setzer is a happy-go-lucky thrill seeker who JumpedAtTheCall. In the GBA version, he's almost the exact opposite: he's willing to take crazy risks because he's a world-weary nihilist who [[DeathSeeker simply doesn't care whether he lives or dies]], which is why he's always ''gambling'' with his life.
*** Notably, his appearance in VideoGame/KingdomHeartsII seems like a {{Flanderization}} of the first version. It's also possible that ''both'' portrayals are correct and his happy-go-lucky attitude is a bit of {{Stepford|Smiler}}ism.
** Edgar also undergoes changes, most notably in his first interactions with Relm. Originally dismissive of the young child artist, the GBA version has him saying "[[TheJailBaitWait Hope you're still around in eight years]]". You see his flirting on the whole as a sign of [[TheCharmer genuine promiscuity]], a [[BunnyEarsLawyer personality quirk]], or a form of [[ObfuscatingStupidity obfuscation]].
*** According to a non-canon doujinshi written by Soraya Saga (the Figaro character designer), he's got a FreudianExcuse -- his mom died when they were kids so he's drawn to seek female companionship where and however he can.
*** And if you think about it, "hope you're still around in eight years" is a pretty bleak thing to say considering [[PlayerPunch what happened just before he said it]]. The statement carries the implication that she's likely to ''die'' before she reaches adulthood.
*** Edgar doesn't say quite the same thing in the original Japanese version, what he says there is something like "That's just criminal......Don't even think of it." From what I've heard that line is supposedly meant as a joke.
** Gestahl's reactions to your behavior at the imperial banquet offer a lot of ways to interpret his character. Toasting the Empire or the Returners, it's obvious there which he'd prefer, but "To our hometowns!" gets the best reaction, particularly interesting since Vector ''is'' his home. Is he approving of your choice because he appreciates you're fighting to defend your homes, or because he's already planning to abandon the remaining Imperials and take power on his own? The best reaction to the question of Celes' loyalties is to declare total trust of her. Is he pleased you trust an ally and didn't turn on them because of what Kefka said, or does he think you're foolish for trusting her so easily after all that she's done and that means his next plan will go well?
*** Gestahl's final lines are pointedly different between the GBA & original Japanese and SNES versions as well. His GBA and Japanese lines give an EvenEvilHasStandards vibe, but his SNES line shows that he's selfish to the last:
--->'''Gestahl/Gastra:''' ガストラ「恐怖が世界をおおうぞ (Terror will engulf the world...)
--->'''Gestahl (GBA):''' The world is about to learn...the true meaning of fear...
--->'''Gestahl (SNES):''' There'll be no-one to worship us...
** Non-translation related:
Locke Cole: star-crossed lover or incredibly creepy man who's so fraught with attachment issues that he keeps his dead girlfriend preserved in a crazy old man's basement?
***
basement? The creepiness is lessened when it's revealed [[spoiler:Locke planned to use the Phoenix Esper to revive Rachel]].
** Terra, is her Esper form just a simple transformation, or does the Esper have its own will and mind separate from the human side? In the case of the latter, is it an entirely different person from Terra, or just another side of her personality?
** Kefka: Destroys everything he can because he thinks it's fun and believes love and friendship are just temporary diversions from the inevitability of death, or a ''very'' dark WoobieDestroyerOfWorlds so twisted by Magitek experiments that he actually can't feel love and friendship anymore and destroys because it's all that gives meaning to his life now? ''VideoGame/DissidiaFinalFantasy'' actually nudges towards the latter, with one of Kefka's iconic nihilistic speeches being voiced with a very sorrowful and melancholy tone...only for the prequel to nudge back towards the former where he's a shining ManipulativeBastard.
*** Chronologically, ''Dissidia'' shows him becoming more pitiful in death than he ever was in life. One thing that can't be denied is that, monster or woobie, Kefka's a mad dog whose very existence and reason for living run counterpoint to the world he exists in.
*** And then between releases of the original game too. In the Japanese version Kefka was a [[TheFool laughing idiot]] and practically a [[TheScrappy Scrappy]], while in the English version Ted Woolsey made him deeply hateful and cruel while keeping his sense of humor, which made him even darker than if it had been removed.
** UpToEleven with the entire group of the Returners! At one point early on, Edgar tells Terra that they would be [[NotSoDifferent no different than the Empire]] if they pushed her too hard to fight for the Returners' cause. Internet debates have continued to rage as to whether or not the Returners were still using and manipulating Terra, whether they cared to admit it or not.
** Atma Weapon/Ultima Buster. Not necessarily the boss itself, but the meaning of its infamous MindScrew pre-battle speech ranges from it believing that the only point to existence [[BloodKnight is to fight]] (hence why it immediately begins attacks after its finished), believing that it [[TheWorldIsNotReady is above humans and that the player characters are unworthy to know]], believing that there [[TheAntiNihilist is no meaning but it choosing to fight the party anyway]] ([[DespairEventHorizon or that there's no meaning to anything period]]), or just being a {{Troll}}.
--> SNES: "I'm Atma... ... Left here since the birth... Forgotten in the river of time... I've had eternity to... Ponder the meaning of things... And now I have an answer..."
--> GBA: "I am the one known as Ultima... Forged an eternity ago and left here... Forgotten in the mists of time... Long have I pondered what I should do... Long, long have I pondered... But now it seems I have an answer..."
Rachel]].


Added DiffLines:

* DependingOnTheAuthor: The GBA and SNES English releases have different translations. Both were done well, but they end up portraying some characters in distinctly different ways.
** Setzer is probably the character that changed the most. In the SNES translation, Setzer is a happy-go-lucky thrill seeker who JumpedAtTheCall. In the GBA version, he's almost the exact opposite: he's willing to take crazy risks because he's a world-weary nihilist who [[DeathSeeker simply doesn't care whether he lives or dies]], which is why he's always ''gambling'' with his life.
*** Notably, his appearance in VideoGame/KingdomHeartsII seems like a {{Flanderization}} of the first version. It's also possible that ''both'' portrayals are correct and his happy-go-lucky attitude is a bit of {{Stepford|Smiler}}ism.
** Edgar also undergoes changes, most notably in his first interactions with Relm. Originally dismissive of the young child artist, the GBA version has him saying "[[TheJailBaitWait Hope you're still around in eight years]]". You see his flirting on the whole as a sign of [[TheCharmer genuine promiscuity]], a [[BunnyEarsLawyer personality quirk]], or a form of [[ObfuscatingStupidity obfuscation]].
*** According to a non-canon doujinshi written by Soraya Saga (the Figaro character designer), he's got a FreudianExcuse -- his mom died when they were kids so he's drawn to seek female companionship where and however he can.
*** And if you think about it, "hope you're still around in eight years" is a pretty bleak thing to say considering [[PlayerPunch what happened just before he said it]]. The statement carries the implication that she's likely to ''die'' before she reaches adulthood.
*** Edgar doesn't say quite the same thing in the original Japanese version, what he says there is something like "That's just criminal......Don't even think of it." From what I've heard that line is supposedly meant as a joke.
** Gestahl's reactions to your behavior at the imperial banquet offer a lot of ways to interpret his character. Toasting the Empire or the Returners, it's obvious there which he'd prefer, but "To our hometowns!" gets the best reaction, particularly interesting since Vector ''is'' his home. Is he approving of your choice because he appreciates you're fighting to defend your homes, or because he's already planning to abandon the remaining Imperials and take power on his own? The best reaction to the question of Celes' loyalties is to declare total trust of her. Is he pleased you trust an ally and didn't turn on them because of what Kefka said, or does he think you're foolish for trusting her so easily after all that she's done and that means his next plan will go well?
*** Gestahl's final lines are pointedly different between the GBA & original Japanese and SNES versions as well. His GBA and Japanese lines give an EvenEvilHasStandards vibe, but his SNES line shows that he's selfish to the last:
--->'''Gestahl/Gastra:''' ガストラ「恐怖が世界をおおうぞ (Terror will engulf the world...)
--->'''Gestahl (GBA):''' The world is about to learn...the true meaning of fear...
--->'''Gestahl (SNES):''' There'll be no-one to worship us...
** Non-translation related: Locke Cole: star-crossed lover or incredibly creepy man who's so fraught with attachment issues that he keeps his dead girlfriend preserved in a crazy old man's basement?
*** The creepiness is lessened when it's revealed [[spoiler:Locke planned to use the Phoenix Esper to revive Rachel]].
** Terra, is her Esper form just a simple transformation, or does the Esper have its own will and mind separate from the human side? In the case of the latter, is it an entirely different person from Terra, or just another side of her personality?
** Kefka: Destroys everything he can because he thinks it's fun and believes love and friendship are just temporary diversions from the inevitability of death, or a ''very'' dark WoobieDestroyerOfWorlds so twisted by Magitek experiments that he actually can't feel love and friendship anymore and destroys because it's all that gives meaning to his life now? ''VideoGame/DissidiaFinalFantasy'' actually nudges towards the latter, with one of Kefka's iconic nihilistic speeches being voiced with a very sorrowful and melancholy tone...only for the prequel to nudge back towards the former where he's a shining ManipulativeBastard.
*** Chronologically, ''Dissidia'' shows him becoming more pitiful in death than he ever was in life. One thing that can't be denied is that, monster or woobie, Kefka's a mad dog whose very existence and reason for living run counterpoint to the world he exists in.
*** And then between releases of the original game too. In the Japanese version Kefka was a [[TheFool laughing idiot]] and practically a [[TheScrappy Scrappy]], while in the English version Ted Woolsey made him deeply hateful and cruel while keeping his sense of humor, which made him even darker than if it had been removed.
** UpToEleven with the entire group of the Returners! At one point early on, Edgar tells Terra that they would be [[NotSoDifferent no different than the Empire]] if they pushed her too hard to fight for the Returners' cause. Internet debates have continued to rage as to whether or not the Returners were still using and manipulating Terra, whether they cared to admit it or not.
** Atma Weapon/Ultima Buster. Not necessarily the boss itself, but the meaning of its infamous MindScrew pre-battle speech ranges from it believing that the only point to existence [[BloodKnight is to fight]] (hence why it immediately begins attacks after its finished), believing that it [[TheWorldIsNotReady is above humans and that the player characters are unworthy to know]], believing that there [[TheAntiNihilist is no meaning but it choosing to fight the party anyway]] ([[DespairEventHorizon or that there's no meaning to anything period]]), or just being a {{Troll}}.
--> SNES: "I'm Atma... ... Left here since the birth... Forgotten in the river of time... I've had eternity to... Ponder the meaning of things... And now I have an answer..."
--> GBA: "I am the one known as Ultima... Forged an eternity ago and left here... Forgotten in the mists of time... Long have I pondered what I should do... Long, long have I pondered... But now it seems I have an answer..."
19th Aug '17 4:28:26 AM GastonRabbit
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** What about the Phantom Train? The music here is one of the best as well, and culminates with perhaps the biggest example of CrazyAwesome. Sabin can '' suplex a friggin' train!''

to:

** What about The music in the Phantom Train? The music here Train is one of the best as well, and culminates with perhaps the biggest example of CrazyAwesome. Sabin can '' suplex ''suplexing a friggin' train!''
25th Jul '17 8:28:01 AM Sabrewing
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

** When Edgar, Locke and Terra first visit Duncan's wilderness cabin, Edgar finds evidence that Sabin has been staying there. Namely his favorite flowers, tea, and ''dishes''.
This list shows the last 10 events of 455. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=YMMV.FinalFantasyVI