History YMMV / FinalFantasyII

12th Sep '17 6:23:42 AM rixion
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* GameBreaker:
** Buff spells, blood swords (which do damage proportional to the target's maximum HP as a result of being HP-drainers, making them deadly against bosses but mostly useless against normal enemies, and [[ReviveKillsZombie worse than useless]] against undead), the minigame exploit (the puzzles repeat every 32 tries, allowing for easy late game equipment) plus the leveling related issues, something that could fill most of an FF subpage on gamebreakers.
** The bare fist "weapon" skill upgrades the basic damage a character does barehanded to compensate for no purchaseable weapon upgrades in this category. It ends up making fists drastically overpowered quite early in the game (by way of comparison, an unarmed character with the maximum of 16 ranks in the 'barehanded' skill has about the same attack power as a character using an InfinityPlusOneSword with 16 in the corresponding skill).
** A secret minigame accessible in the Snowfields allows you to play a 16 card match-type game where you receive rewards based on how fast you match all cards and how many misses you get. With good memory and fast reflexes, you can score Ethers, Hi-Potions, Phoenix Downs and thousands of gil. Did we mention this game costs you nothing but time and can be played infinitely? What about the fact that each time you access the minigame, there are only 32 puzzles "solutions" the game will cycle through, in-order? Finally, getting the Toad spell up to Level 16 increases the Gil obtained, and changes the items won from restorative items to items that cast spells and incredibly powerful equipment.
** The Teleport spell. In battle, it can kill enemies instantly, and at a high enough level, you can consistently get kills against many enemies. Even better, you can level it up outside of battle by entering a town/dungeon, casting Teleport, re-entering the town/dungeon, etc. The only downside is that it leaves the caster with low HP, but you can use Cure on him/her (which, in turn, allows ''that'' spell to level up as well).
** The Life spell, since you can split cast it on your entire party. Also, casting it against [[ReviveKillsZombie large numbers of undead]] is a good way of leveling it, and makes [[GoddamnBats them]] a lot easier to deal with.
** The ultimate weapons in the 20th Anniversary version give huge stat boosts, +99 for some of them, and of course have high attack power. The ''really'' game breaking ones are the ones that boost Stamina or Magic. The game's mechanics for HP and MP gain specifically increase them by the character's Stamina and Magic. So with 99 Magic and Stamina, the character will get 99 HP or MP the next time the stat levels up. Enjoying being able to smash into the MP cap in a few battles and pumping up your characters at least a thousand HP in that same time.
** The [[spoiler:Wild Rose]], the ultimate weapon for [[spoiler:Scott]] in ''Soul of Rebirth''. It maxes out (among other stats) [[spoiler:Scott]]'s Intelligence when equipped and casts '''Berserk XVI''' when used as an item, buffing your party's physical attack power to ridiculous levels.

to:

* GameBreaker:
** Buff spells, blood swords (which do damage proportional to the target's maximum HP as a result of being HP-drainers, making them deadly against bosses but mostly useless against normal enemies, and [[ReviveKillsZombie worse than useless]] against undead), the minigame exploit (the puzzles repeat every 32 tries, allowing for easy late game equipment) plus the leveling related issues, something that could fill most of an FF subpage on gamebreakers.
** The bare fist "weapon" skill upgrades the basic damage a character does barehanded to compensate for no purchaseable weapon upgrades in this category. It ends up making fists drastically overpowered quite early in the game (by way of comparison, an unarmed character with the maximum of 16 ranks in the 'barehanded' skill has about the same attack power as a character using an InfinityPlusOneSword with 16 in the corresponding skill).
** A secret minigame accessible in the Snowfields allows you to play a 16 card match-type game where you receive rewards based on how fast you match all cards and how many misses you get. With good memory and fast reflexes, you can score Ethers, Hi-Potions, Phoenix Downs and thousands of gil. Did we mention this game costs you nothing but time and can be played infinitely? What about the fact that each time you access the minigame, there are only 32 puzzles "solutions" the game will cycle through, in-order? Finally, getting the Toad spell up to Level 16 increases the Gil obtained, and changes the items won from restorative items to items that cast spells and incredibly powerful equipment.
** The Teleport spell. In battle, it can kill enemies instantly, and at a high enough level, you can consistently get kills against many enemies. Even better, you can level it up outside of battle by entering a town/dungeon, casting Teleport, re-entering the town/dungeon, etc. The only downside is that it leaves the caster with low HP, but you can use Cure on him/her (which, in turn, allows ''that'' spell to level up as well).
** The Life spell, since you can split cast it on your entire party. Also, casting it against [[ReviveKillsZombie large numbers of undead]] is a good way of leveling it, and makes [[GoddamnBats them]] a lot easier to deal with.
** The ultimate weapons in the 20th Anniversary version give huge stat boosts, +99 for some of them, and of course have high attack power. The ''really'' game breaking ones are the ones that boost Stamina or Magic. The game's mechanics for HP and MP gain specifically increase them by the character's Stamina and Magic. So with 99 Magic and Stamina, the character will get 99 HP or MP the next time the stat levels up. Enjoying being able to smash into the MP cap in a few battles and pumping up your characters at least a thousand HP in that same time.
** The [[spoiler:Wild Rose]], the ultimate weapon for [[spoiler:Scott]] in ''Soul of Rebirth''. It maxes out (among other stats) [[spoiler:Scott]]'s Intelligence when equipped and casts '''Berserk XVI''' when used as an item, buffing your party's physical attack power to ridiculous levels.
GameBreaker: [[GameBreaker/FinalFantasy Here]].
7th Aug '17 12:06:41 PM SamMax
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Added DiffLines:

* PolishedPort: The many remakes and ports of the game do add some content and reduce the annoyances. That said, they don't bring enough improvements to keep the game from being contested even among classic fans.
28th Jun '17 12:35:08 PM angelothewizard
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* AnticlimaxBoss: Borghen, the foul arch-traitor who assisted the Empire in taking the heroes' hometown and thereby resulting in the deaths of their parents, turns out to be the weakest boss in the game by a mile. Moreover, after his death he sets off a trap that causes the death of [[spoiler:Josef]], meaning that this wimp also gets the honor of being the first Final Fantasy bad guy to kill off a playable character. The Emperor also fits this trope when you fight him in the Cyclone, where he's a pushover (though he turns into a killing machine for [[spoiler:his turn as the final boss.]])

to:

* AnticlimaxBoss: Borghen, the foul arch-traitor who assisted the Empire in taking the heroes' hometown and thereby resulting in the deaths of their parents, turns out to be the weakest boss in the game by a mile. In fact, the boss monster the party just fought, the Adamantoise, was far more dangerous. Moreover, after his death he sets off a trap that causes the death of [[spoiler:Josef]], meaning that this wimp also gets the honor of being the first Final Fantasy bad guy to kill off a playable character. The Emperor also fits this trope when you fight him in the Cyclone, where he's a pushover (though he turns into a killing machine for [[spoiler:his turn as the final boss.]])
12th Oct '16 1:14:39 AM Miracle@StOlaf
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* SeinfeldIsUnfunny: It really cannot be overstated how ahead of the curve this game was in terms of story. A complex cast of characters, a epic plot, and a charismatic and intelligent villain all in a NES-era RPG. You might also recognize these tropes from damn near every JRPG released since then.

to:

* SeinfeldIsUnfunny: It really cannot be overstated how ahead of the curve this game was in terms of story. A complex cast of characters, a an epic plot, and a charismatic and intelligent villain all in a NES-era RPG. You might also recognize these tropes from damn near every JRPG released since then.
12th Oct '16 1:13:50 AM Miracle@StOlaf
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SeinfeldIsUnfunny: It really cannot be overstated how ahead of the curve this game was in terms of story. A complex cast of characters, a epic plot, and a charismatic and intelligent villain all in a NES-era RPG. You might also recognize these tropes from damn near every JRPG released since then.

to:

* SeinfeldIsUnfunny: It really cannot be overstated how ahead of the curve this game was in terms of story. A complex cast of characters, a epic plot, and a charismatic and intelligent villain all in a NES-era RPG. You might also recognize these tropes from damn near every JRPG released since then.
12th Oct '16 1:13:30 AM Miracle@StOlaf
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Added DiffLines:

SeinfeldIsUnfunny: It really cannot be overstated how ahead of the curve this game was in terms of story. A complex cast of characters, a epic plot, and a charismatic and intelligent villain all in a NES-era RPG. You might also recognize these tropes from damn near every JRPG released since then.
28th Jul '16 11:35:12 AM Bourne~Endeavor
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* ScrappyMechanic: The "Leveling" system is infamous for being among the worst in the entire series. You do not gain traditional EXP from killing monsters. Instead, characters level skills based upon use. Therefore, you must _use_ each individual magic in order to increase its level. HP works in a similar fashion-- you gain more by being hit. The issue there is the game doesn't differentiate between monsters or players. A common tactic for players is to beat up their own party at the start of the game.

to:

* ScrappyMechanic: The "Leveling" system is infamous for being among the worst in the entire series. You do not gain traditional EXP from killing monsters. Instead, characters level skills based upon use. Therefore, you must _use_ ''use'' each individual magic in order to increase its level. HP works in a similar fashion-- you gain more by being hit. The issue there is the game doesn't differentiate between monsters or players. A common tactic for players is to beat up their own party at the start of the game.
28th Jul '16 11:34:29 AM Bourne~Endeavor
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Added DiffLines:

* ScrappyMechanic: The "Leveling" system is infamous for being among the worst in the entire series. You do not gain traditional EXP from killing monsters. Instead, characters level skills based upon use. Therefore, you must _use_ each individual magic in order to increase its level. HP works in a similar fashion-- you gain more by being hit. The issue there is the game doesn't differentiate between monsters or players. A common tactic for players is to beat up their own party at the start of the game.
14th Jul '16 1:49:40 PM Ferot_Dreadnaught
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* TheyJustDidntCare: In the GBA version, the Dark Knight's portrait is [[spoiler:clearly just a darkened version of Leon's portrait]]. The PSP version gives the Dark Knight a helmet in his portrait, though [[spoiler:he still has the same armor and stare]].
28th May '16 10:00:08 PM nombretomado
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** In the original and PS1 versions, if one selects a move and then cancels it, the game treated it as if you had performed the move, for the purposes of raising stats. Thus it is possible to get astronomically high strength and magic skills almost as soon as you start the game, if your fingers can take it.

to:

** In the original and PS1 [=PS1=] versions, if one selects a move and then cancels it, the game treated it as if you had performed the move, for the purposes of raising stats. Thus it is possible to get astronomically high strength and magic skills almost as soon as you start the game, if your fingers can take it.



* NewerThanTheyThink[=/=]OlderThanTheyThink: This game was the origin of a lot of ''Final Fantasy'' standbys. Newer Than They Think is for elements like Cid[[note]]The "Cid of the Lufaine" from FFI is a PosthumousCharacter added in re-releases[[/note]], chocobos, etc., which weren't in ''Final Fantasy I''—this comes as a surprise to a lot of people. And Older Than They Think comes into play with many of the plot elements—the Evil Empire, Bishounen villain who's seeking godhood, essentially, party members being Killed Off for Real, and even the presence of any plot at all—which many people seem to think only started in the SNES and PS1 era.

to:

* NewerThanTheyThink[=/=]OlderThanTheyThink: This game was the origin of a lot of ''Final Fantasy'' standbys. Newer Than They Think is for elements like Cid[[note]]The "Cid of the Lufaine" from FFI is a PosthumousCharacter added in re-releases[[/note]], chocobos, etc., which weren't in ''Final Fantasy I''—this comes as a surprise to a lot of people. And Older Than They Think comes into play with many of the plot elements—the Evil Empire, Bishounen villain who's seeking godhood, essentially, party members being Killed Off for Real, and even the presence of any plot at all—which many people seem to think only started in the SNES and PS1 [=PS1=] era.
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