History YMMV / FamilyFeud

1st Nov '16 3:52:56 PM KoopaKid17
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ScrappyMechanic:
** Sudden Death from 2003 onward where the entire game hinges on getting the number one-answer. With point values already tripled, it more or less boils down to "don't screw up if you ring in too early".
** Fast Money:
*** No questions are more hated by the fan base than those beginning with "On a scale of one to ten..." which have appeared in all versions. With a wide range of answers, fans accuse these of being budget-savers since number one answers to those rarely top 30 points. On a few occasions, contestants have guessed [[WhatAnIdiot numbers outside of the range]] despite such answers never getting any points in the surveys.
*** Since 1999, getting all the number one answers ''never'' adds up to more than 200 points. While this is more or less enforced so that the second contestant is required to play, it also makes an already hard bonus round [[NintendoHard even harder]].



*** Aside from being HotterAndSexier, overly verbose questions have been asked with greater frequency in Fast Money. This started on the Anderson version and had gotten out of control by the time Harvey took over.

to:

*** Aside from being HotterAndSexier, overly verbose questions have been asked with greater frequency in Fast Money. This started on the Anderson version to take advantage of the extended time limits and had gotten out of control by the grown more numerous with each hosting change. Passing on just one creates an even bigger time Harvey took over.sink.
18th Oct '16 10:58:02 AM KoopaKid17
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** Steve Harvey. Depending on who you ask, he is either the best thing to happen to ''Feud'' since Ray Combs or the worst. Some fans consider his reactions to off-the wall answers as hilarious and justified while others believe they come across as mean-spirited and downright insulting.



** Steve Harvey's version in general, particularly for its use of adult content.

to:

** Steve Harvey's Harvey. Depending on who you ask, he is either the best thing to happen to ''Feud'' since Ray Combs or the worst. Some fans consider his reactions to off-the wall answers as hilarious and justified while others believe they come across as [[JerkAss mean-spirited and downright insulting]]. His version in general, general is exceptionally divisive, particularly for its use of adult content.



* DorkAge: Both revivals have had one.

to:

* DorkAge: Both revivals have had one.Oy.



** Some fans will argue that under Harvey, the current version either never came out of its Dork Age or dragged even further into one. Shortly after he began hosting, the produces discovered the popularity of his {{Wild Take}}s whenever a contestant gave a lurid answer. As a result, the writers began to enforce this, making the questions HotterAndSexier to encourage such reactions.



*** Questions that are adult-oriented. During the Dawson era, a question might be "Name something a clown might take off after the end of his show"; in the Harvey era, it's common to hear the question as "We asked 100 women: Name something you would take off a clown before having sex with him." In addition, many questions pertain to divorce that don't really add to the question or are just played to appeal to the lowest common denominator. For instance, it isn't enough to merely ask a question such as "Name something a divorcing couple might have trouble splitting up," but the Harvey era takes it a step farther by asking such fare as "If Tarzan were to get a divorce, what would Jane get in the settlement?" and "If Santa Claus got a divorce, what would Mrs. Claus get?" Questions encouraging answers pertaining to the male anatomy and bodily functions were uttered every day. Even seemingly benign questions, such as "Name something a squirrel does with a nut," are asked to get contestants to utter responses that are euphemisms (in this example, "scratch it"). These questions are probably meant to take advantage of Harvey's comedy, which is why you see many of those type of questions end up on their [=YouTube=] page, but they even started appearing during John O'Hurley's waning days. Harvey himself has lampshaded this.

to:

*** Questions that are adult-oriented. During the Dawson era, a question might be "Name adult-oriented.
### '''Dawson-era Question:''' Name
something a clown might take off after the end of his show"; in the Harvey era, it's common to hear the question as "We show.\\
'''Harvey-era Question:''' We
asked 100 women: Name something you would take off a clown before having sex with him." In addition, many him.
*** Since Harvey began hosting,
questions pertaining to the DoubleStandard, usually [[DoubleStandardAbuseFemaleOnMale Female On Male Abuse]] have grown in number. These are often invoked by Harvey and even ''PlayedForLaughs''.
### '''Pre Harvey-era Question:''' Name a household item you might use to defend yourself from a burglar.\\
'''Harvey-era Question:''' What household item might a wife use to kill her husband?
*** Questions
pertain to divorce that don't really add to the question or are just played to appeal to the lowest common denominator. For instance, it isn't enough to merely ask a question such as "Name denominator.
### '''Pre Harvey-era Question:''' Name
something a divorcing couple might have trouble splitting up," but the Harvey era takes it a step farther by asking such fare as "If up.\\
'''Harvey-era Question:''' If
Tarzan were to get a divorce, what would Jane get in the settlement?" and "If settlement?/If Santa Claus got a divorce, what would Mrs. Claus get?" get?
***
Questions encouraging answers pertaining to the male anatomy and bodily functions were uttered every day. Even seemingly benign questions, such as "Name something a squirrel does with a nut," are asked to get contestants to utter responses that are euphemisms (in this example, "scratch it"). These questions are probably meant to take advantage of Harvey's comedy, which is why you see many of those type of questions end up on their [=YouTube=] page, but they even started appearing during John O'Hurley's waning days. Harvey himself has lampshaded this.this.
*** Aside from being HotterAndSexier, overly verbose questions have been asked with greater frequency in Fast Money. This started on the Anderson version and had gotten out of control by the time Harvey took over.
### '''Dawson-era Question:''' Name your favorite fattening food.\\
'''Harvey-era Question:''' Fill in the blank: If I could eat all I want of one food without getting fat, I would choose (what).
20th Sep '16 9:28:06 PM Lirodon
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* TwoDecadesBehind: By the final year of the Dawson era, the big board's answer-flipping mechanics and Ferranti-Packard Fast Money display paled in comparison to the computerized game boards used on ''Series/TicTacDough'' and the then-new ''Series/{{Jeopardy}}!''. The board was retained for the Combs era and gradually had its mechanism tightened up over the course of that version's run, making it run smoother and less clunky. When Dawson returned, the show did away with the flipping panels completely and used the Fast Money side for the entire game. In an attempt to hide the board from the home viewers, they used an on-screen graphic, much like the computerized screen seen on the current revival [[note]](until around 2008, at least)[[/note]], to display the answers. Sometimes, they would forget to put up the graphic and show the answers as displayed on the flip-dot Fast Money board.

to:

* TwoDecadesBehind: By the final year of the Dawson era, the big board's answer-flipping mechanics and Ferranti-Packard Fast Money display paled in comparison to the computerized game boards used on ''Series/TicTacDough'' and the then-new ''Series/{{Jeopardy}}!''. The board was retained for the Combs era and gradually had its mechanism tightened up over the course of that version's run, making it run smoother and less clunky. When Dawson returned, the show did away with the flipping panels completely flip-card board and used the Fast Money side for the entire game. In an attempt to hide the board from the home viewers, they used an on-screen graphic, much like the computerized screen seen on the current revival [[note]](until around 2008, at least)[[/note]], to display the answers. Sometimes, they would forget to put up the graphic and show the answers as displayed on the flip-dot Fast Money board.board for the entire game, but overlaid a computerized version of the mechanical board onto it in post-production. The current run continues to use a computerized board, but on a large video wall instead of a CGI overlay.
20th Sep '16 9:11:38 PM Lirodon
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** The 2008 ''Celebrity Family Feud''. Why producers made the decision to have ''Al Roker'' of all people serve as emcee remains a mystery. Roker, while known as a decent weatherman and enjoyable fixture on the ''Today'' show, did a lackluster job hosting this series, with his weak style and inability to be comedic drawing (unfavorable) comparisons to Richard Karn. What makes this even more confusing is that the main show already ''had'' a host -- John O'Hurley -- who had long proven himself to be more than competent at the gig. However, O'Hurley had already committed himself to a celebrity cooking show that wound up tanking after one episode.

to:

** The 2008 ''Celebrity Family Feud''. Why producers made the decision to have ''Al Roker'' of all people serve as emcee remains a mystery. Roker, while known as a decent weatherman and enjoyable fixture on the ''Today'' show, did a lackluster job hosting this series, with his weak style and inability to be comedic drawing (unfavorable) comparisons to Richard Karn. What makes this even more confusing is that the main show already ''had'' a host -- John O'Hurley -- who had long proven himself to be more than competent at the gig. However, O'Hurley had already committed himself to a celebrity cooking talent show on CBS, ''Secret Talents of the Stars'', that wound up tanking after one episode.
11th Aug '16 5:07:49 AM Gimere
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* BaseBreaker: Steve Harvey. Depending on who you ask, he is either the best thing to happen to ''Feud'' since Ray Combs or the worst. Some fans consider his reactions to off-the wall answers as hilarious and justified while others believe they come across as mean-spirited and downright insulting.


Added DiffLines:

** Steve Harvey. Depending on who you ask, he is either the best thing to happen to ''Feud'' since Ray Combs or the worst. Some fans consider his reactions to off-the wall answers as hilarious and justified while others believe they come across as mean-spirited and downright insulting.
30th Jul '16 4:16:31 PM Gimere
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* HilariousInHindsight: The family involved in the 1980 "September" incident which drove Richard Dawson nuts returned during his 1994-95 tenure, but this time, one of the daughters was pregnant with a due date in... September.

to:

* HilariousInHindsight: HilariousInHindsight:
**
The family involved in the 1980 "September" incident which drove Richard Dawson nuts returned during his 1994-95 tenure, but this time, one of the daughters was pregnant with a due date in... September.
19th Jul '16 7:48:22 PM KoopaKid17
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

* NightmareFuel: A Harvey question from 2016 asked "What household item might a wife use to [[BlackWidow kill her husband]]?" [[RefugeInAudacity No, seriously]].
15th Jul '16 5:47:44 PM KoopaKid17
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ThatOneLevel: The Triple Round in the Anderson and Karn versions. When the current syndicated run began, the number of Strikes in the Triple Round was reduced from three to one. This sometimes created an awkward situation where a trailing team could lose by not coming up with enough points before the other family got a chance to steal. Beginning with Karn's second season, the Triple Round allowed three Strikes again but Karn was allowed to read the question only once, a rule that was dropped when O'Hurley started hosting.

to:

* ThatOneLevel: The Triple Round in the Anderson and Karn versions. When the current syndicated run began, the number of Strikes in the Triple Round was reduced from three to one. This sometimes created an awkward situation where a trailing team could lose by not coming up with enough points before the other family got a chance to steal. Beginning with Karn's second season, a more conventional play to 300 points was rolled out with the Triple Round allowed allowing three Strikes again but again. However, Karn was allowed to read the question in its entirety only once, a rule that was dropped when O'Hurley started hosting.
15th Jul '16 5:41:35 PM KoopaKid17
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

** Coupled with TooSoon, a 2015 celebrity edition asked "Name something that can be inflated or deflated." to Rob Gronkowski of the New England Patriots. At the time the Patriots had been accused using deflated footballs during NFL post-season games and right in the middle of it was superstar quarterback Tom Brady. Almost one year to the day after the episode aired, Brady's four-game suspension which he had successfully appealed for the 2015 season was reinstated for the following year.
14th Jul '16 1:15:25 PM Ferot_Dreadnaught
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** The 1994-95 version's scaled-down set necessitated throwing out the 'trilon' that displayed main game answers and the Fast Money board, inexplicably using chyron graphics in its stead while in-studio the Ferranti-Packard Fast Money board was used. Half the time, the graphics department would [[TheyJustDidntCare forget to put up the chyrons anyway]], and the home viewers would see the mechanical board.

to:

** The 1994-95 version's scaled-down set necessitated throwing out the 'trilon' that displayed main game answers and the Fast Money board, inexplicably using chyron graphics in its stead while in-studio the Ferranti-Packard Fast Money board was used. Half the time, the graphics department would [[TheyJustDidntCare forget to put up the chyrons anyway]], anyway, and the home viewers would see the mechanical board.



* TwoDecadesBehind: By the final year of the Dawson era, the big board's answer-flipping mechanics and Ferranti-Packard Fast Money display paled in comparison to the computerized game boards used on ''Series/TicTacDough'' and the then-new ''Series/{{Jeopardy}}!''. The board was retained for the Combs era and gradually had its mechanism tightened up over the course of that version's run, making it run smoother and less clunky. When Dawson returned, the show did away with the flipping panels completely and used the Fast Money side for the entire game. In an attempt to hide the board from the home viewers, they used an on-screen graphic, much like the computerized screen seen on the current revival [[note]](until around 2008, at least)[[/note]], to display the answers. [[TheyJustDidntCare Sometimes]], they would forget to put up the graphic and show the answers as displayed on the flip-dot Fast Money board.

to:

* TwoDecadesBehind: By the final year of the Dawson era, the big board's answer-flipping mechanics and Ferranti-Packard Fast Money display paled in comparison to the computerized game boards used on ''Series/TicTacDough'' and the then-new ''Series/{{Jeopardy}}!''. The board was retained for the Combs era and gradually had its mechanism tightened up over the course of that version's run, making it run smoother and less clunky. When Dawson returned, the show did away with the flipping panels completely and used the Fast Money side for the entire game. In an attempt to hide the board from the home viewers, they used an on-screen graphic, much like the computerized screen seen on the current revival [[note]](until around 2008, at least)[[/note]], to display the answers. [[TheyJustDidntCare Sometimes]], Sometimes, they would forget to put up the graphic and show the answers as displayed on the flip-dot Fast Money board.
This list shows the last 10 events of 137. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=YMMV.FamilyFeud