History YMMV / Bluebeard

23rd Dec '15 5:00:47 PM cordychase
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** In ''The Seventh Bride'', the Bluebeard figure steals something from each of his wives--sight, voice, life, etc. While he doesn't necessarily ''intend'' to kill them, he certainly doesn't seem to care if they don't survive the process.
1st Dec '15 1:40:22 PM ScroogeMacDuck
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** Perrault ends his story with the moral that a woman sticking her nose in her husband's affairs will ruin a perfectly good marriage - even if said affairs include murdering countless women.

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** Perrault ends his story with the moral that a woman sticking her nose in her husband's affairs will ruin a perfectly good marriage - even if said affairs include murdering countless women.[[note]] It should be noted, however, that Perrault might have been [[SarcasmMode being sarcastic]] here; there are other examples of him telling perfectly immoral stories with an immoral Aesop in order to cause a repulsion from the reader against the fact that this Aesop sometimes happens. The most well-known example is the fable of the Wolf and the Lamb. The Wolf decides to eat the Lamp, gives a fallacious reason for it, the Lamb is obviously right, the Wolf eats him anyway, and the Aesop given is "The law of the strongest is always the best". Yet you can bet that Perrault didn't believe a single word of that as a moral value. [[/note]]
7th Oct '15 9:53:05 AM Kennisaurus
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** Does a serial killer really need a reason to kill someone? The first wife was probably killed to give him an [[DisproportionateRetribution excuse to kill the others]].
7th Mar '15 7:03:08 PM fearlessnikki
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* WhatDoYouMeanItsNotForKids: Perrault did not write Bluebeard or any of his other stories for children, yet they were commonly marketed to children for centuries. Bluebeard frequently appeared in fairy tale collections for children until the early twentieth century.

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* WhatDoYouMeanItsNotForKids: Perrault did not write Bluebeard or any of his other stories for children, yet they were commonly marketed to children for centuries. Bluebeard frequently appeared in fairy tale collections for children until the early twentieth century. This is Lampshaded in ''Literature/TheShining'' when one night Jack drunkenly read the story to Danny - scaring the ever-loving shit out of him and making Wendy furious.
31st Jan '15 8:49:22 AM ACW
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** CompleteMonster: The [[UrExample original incarnation]] of the [[AntagonistTitle titular Bluebeard]] stands as one of the earliest examples of a vicious killer. [[FauxAffablyEvil Posing as a rich gentlemen]] to win the heart of a young maiden, Bluebeard seduces the girl into marriage. Bluebeard hands the maiden all the keys to the doors in his mansion, but warns her never to open one particular door. Inevitably, [[CuriosityIsACrapshoot the maiden's curiosity]] drives her to open the door, revealing Bluebeard as a {{serial killer}} who married many women, murdered them by [[SlashedThroat slitting their throats]], then hid their bodies in his mansion. Bluebeard finds out, and in a fit of rage, tries to kill the maiden as well before being stopped. With little motivation to couple his spree-killing aside from occasionally being depicted as {{greed}}y, Bluebeard defined, and still stands as the most brutal incarnation of, [[TheBluebeard one of the most terrifying modern serial killer tropes]].

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** * CompleteMonster: The [[UrExample original incarnation]] of the [[AntagonistTitle titular Bluebeard]] stands as one of the earliest examples of a vicious killer. [[FauxAffablyEvil Posing as a rich gentlemen]] to win the heart of a young maiden, Bluebeard seduces the girl into marriage. Bluebeard hands the maiden all the keys to the doors in his mansion, but warns her never to open one particular door. Inevitably, [[CuriosityIsACrapshoot the maiden's curiosity]] drives her to open the door, revealing Bluebeard as a {{serial killer}} who married many women, murdered them by [[SlashedThroat slitting their throats]], then hid their bodies in his mansion. Bluebeard finds out, and in a fit of rage, tries to kill the maiden as well before being stopped. With little motivation to couple his spree-killing aside from occasionally being depicted as {{greed}}y, Bluebeard defined, and still stands as the most brutal incarnation of, [[TheBluebeard one of the most terrifying modern serial killer tropes]].
31st Jan '15 8:49:14 AM ACW
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**CompleteMonster: The [[UrExample original incarnation]] of the [[AntagonistTitle titular Bluebeard]] stands as one of the earliest examples of a vicious killer. [[FauxAffablyEvil Posing as a rich gentlemen]] to win the heart of a young maiden, Bluebeard seduces the girl into marriage. Bluebeard hands the maiden all the keys to the doors in his mansion, but warns her never to open one particular door. Inevitably, [[CuriosityIsACrapshoot the maiden's curiosity]] drives her to open the door, revealing Bluebeard as a {{serial killer}} who married many women, murdered them by [[SlashedThroat slitting their throats]], then hid their bodies in his mansion. Bluebeard finds out, and in a fit of rage, tries to kill the maiden as well before being stopped. With little motivation to couple his spree-killing aside from occasionally being depicted as {{greed}}y, Bluebeard defined, and still stands as the most brutal incarnation of, [[TheBluebeard one of the most terrifying modern serial killer tropes]].
21st Dec '14 3:26:03 AM Morgenthaler
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* {{Fanon}}: Due to the popularity of a British pantomime by George Colman, Bluebeard was frequently depicted as Turkish or Middle Eastern throughout the nineteenth century. His last wife was given the Arabic name Fatima. The nature of the story makes this orientalization of the story rife with UnfortunateImplications by today's standards. Andrew Lang insisted that Bluebeard was European and objected to his illustrator including oriental elements in the illustrations for ''The Blue Fairy Book''.

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* {{Fanon}}: Due to the popularity of a British pantomime by George Colman, Bluebeard was frequently depicted as Turkish or Middle Eastern throughout the nineteenth century. His last wife was given the Arabic name Fatima. The nature of the story makes this orientalization of the story rife with UnfortunateImplications ValuesDissonance by today's standards. Andrew Lang insisted that Bluebeard was European and objected to his illustrator including oriental elements in the illustrations for ''The Blue Fairy Book''.
14th Jun '14 9:25:24 AM Heart
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* FridgeLogic: Why did Bluebeard murder his very first wife? No versions of the story are forthcoming with any explanation...
17th May '14 8:23:37 PM CartoonBrewMonkey
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* [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dr6a6v21TIc ...And then they had a fashion show!]]

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* ** [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dr6a6v21TIc ...And then they had a fashion show!]]
17th May '14 8:23:08 PM CartoonBrewMonkey
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* [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dr6a6v21TIc ...And then they had a fashion show!]]
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=YMMV.Bluebeard