History YMMV / AtlasShrugged

5th Sep '16 4:17:32 PM hollowcity
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*** So he's making a profit by becoming a looter himself?



* MisaimedFandom: The book is hugely and openly critical of torture and targeted killings, religion, and trusting feelings over evidence. And yet AIG CEO Bob Benmosche claims to be a fan, even though the ''villains'' of the book are [=CEOs=] who take government bailouts after causing an economic collapse through sheer ineptitude.

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* MisaimedFandom: The book is hugely and openly critical of torture and targeted killings, religion, and trusting feelings over evidence. And yet AIG CEO Bob Benmosche claims to be a fan, even though the ''villains'' of the book are [=CEOs=] who take government bailouts after causing an economic collapse through sheer ineptitude. Of course, Ayn Rand herself was known for flip-flopping in her own beliefs, especially later in life.


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** Another certain percentage of the politically and historically aware find it the opposite, pointing out the destructive influences the book has had on politics in their own beliefs.
10th Jul '16 9:06:20 PM rjd1922
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* MemeticMutation: "Galtse"; an InterruptingMeme, where a innocuous looking forum post suddenly turns into John Galt's speech, and then proceeds to recite as much of the speech as the character limit will allow. It is usually employed as a means to {{troll}} other users by making them having to scroll for a while to get past the text.

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* MemeticMutation: "Galtse"; [[http://galtse.cx/ "Galtse"]]; an InterruptingMeme, where a innocuous looking forum post suddenly turns into John Galt's speech, and then proceeds to recite as much of the speech as the character limit will allow. It is usually employed as a means to {{troll}} other users by making them having to scroll for a while to get past the text.
13th Jun '16 5:27:26 PM TheAmazingBlachman
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* MemeticMutation: "Galtse"; an InterruptingMeme, where a innocuous looking forum post suddenly turns into John Galt's speech, and then proceeds to recite as much of the speech as the character limit will allow. It is usually employed as a means to {{troll]] other users by making them having to scroll for a while to get past the text.

to:

* MemeticMutation: "Galtse"; an InterruptingMeme, where a innocuous looking forum post suddenly turns into John Galt's speech, and then proceeds to recite as much of the speech as the character limit will allow. It is usually employed as a means to {{troll]] {{troll}} other users by making them having to scroll for a while to get past the text.
13th Jun '16 5:27:07 PM TheAmazingBlachman
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Added DiffLines:

* MemeticMutation: "Galtse"; an InterruptingMeme, where a innocuous looking forum post suddenly turns into John Galt's speech, and then proceeds to recite as much of the speech as the character limit will allow. It is usually employed as a means to {{troll]] other users by making them having to scroll for a while to get past the text.
4th May '16 8:39:54 PM Angeldeb82
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* CanonSue: Rand's style is a celebration of what she feels humanity can be at its greatest moments, and the "good" characters tend to embody that. However, all the heroic characters are believable, possess flaws, are capable of making mistakes, and have sympathetic motives and backstories. The major exception is John Galt, who Rand designed to be perfect and -- to readers who expect characters to be more human than invincible perfection -- comes across as an over-the-top MarySue. He is exactly what Rand intended him to be, and by being so, he specifically fits the description of:
** BlackHoleSue: Everything is about him -- all the heroes worship him and are willing to sacrifice everything to follow and/or protect him, all the villains fear but worship him and want him on their side, and all the world regards him as a LivingLegend. Everyone considers him the embodiment of everything powerful and admirable and is irresistibly drawn to him.
** EinsteinSue: The character the text treats as the personification of perfection and invincible strength is also a super-genius whose inventions include a perpetual motion device and a ray screen that can cover a city in an InvisibilityCloak.
** GodModeSue: Even by in-universe standards, the text portrays him as infinitely smarter and emotionally stronger than any of the other heroes, who worship, follow, and thank him like he's a god.
** RelationshipSue: Rand's notes on what he represents to each character (ex. the man Dagny always wanted to fall in love with, the friend Hank Rearden has always wanted) can be found, among other places, in the novel's Signet Classics edition. They clearly spell out that part of his main purpose was to be the perfect mate for Dagny. After meeting him, Dagny thinks about how he embodies the qualities she always sought in a man but never expected to find in one person and mentally dwells at length on how she's been waiting, hoping, and praying to find him and been working to be worthy of him all her life.



* FauxSymbolism: The character of John Galt has some amazing similarities to the story of Jesus Christ in Literature/TheBible.
** Jesus goes around recruiting disciples; Galt is making the creative people of the world go into hiding.
** Jesus gives The Sermon on the Mount that's known to the world; Galt gives a speech on the radio that's heard the world over.
** Jesus announced in advance at the Last Supper that he would be betrayed by one of his Disciples; Galt tells Dagny in advance while they're at Galt's Gulch that if she continues the way she is going she will betray him.
** Jesus is delivered to his enemies and betrayed by Judas for 30 pieces of silver; Galt is delivered to his enemies and betrayed by Dagny for $500,000.
** Satan offers Jesus the chance to be king of the world if he will accede to his demand to kneel and worship him; Mr. Thompson offers Galt the chance to be economic dictator of the country if he will accede to his demand to get the country off its knees economically.
** Jesus refuses the offer and tells Satan that he has nothing to offer him; Galt refuses the offer and tells Mr. Thompson that he has nothing to offer him.
** Jesus is shown the kingdoms of the world by Satan; Galt is shown to to the world by Mr. Thompson at the Wayne-Falkland hotel.
** Jesus is nailed to a cross; Galt is hooked up to an electric generator.
** His torturers take his clothes. (In both stories.)
** Jesus is crucified; Galt is tortured with electroshock.
** Jesus escapes from his tomb; Galt escapes from the State Science Institute.
** Jesus returns to heaven; Galt returns to Galt's Gulch, the Striker's version of Heaven.



* ScienceMarchesOn: Trains and radios being impressively important, a copper-iron alloy is set to replace steel, palm-activated locks are popular...and so on. The films [[JustifiedTrope justify]] the trains with a prologue indicating that airplanes have become impractical due to issues in the Middle East--and the US Government's refusal to drill here (as Ellis Wyatt notes).
* SeinfeldIsUnfunny: As modern readers are probably familiar with heroes-posing-as-playboys like ComicBooks/{{Batman}}, ComicBooks/IronMan, etc....the fact that Francisco is faking his fall from "great man" to "worthless playboy" isn't that big of a revelation, nowadays: modern readers likely brace for it.

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* ScienceMarchesOn: Trains and radios being impressively important, a copper-iron alloy is set to replace steel, palm-activated locks are popular...and so on. The films [[JustifiedTrope justify]] {{justif|iedTrope}}y the trains with a prologue indicating that airplanes have become impractical due to issues in the Middle East--and the US Government's refusal to drill here (as Ellis Wyatt notes).
* SeinfeldIsUnfunny: As modern readers are probably familiar with heroes-posing-as-playboys like ComicBooks/{{Batman}}, ComicBooks/IronMan, Franchise/{{Batman}}, ComicBook/IronMan, etc....the fact that Francisco is faking his fall from "great man" to "worthless playboy" isn't that big of a revelation, nowadays: modern readers likely brace for it.



* WhatDoYouMeanItsNotSymbolic: The character of John Galt has some amazing similarities to the story of Jesus Christ in The Bible.
** Jesus goes around recruiting disciples; Galt is making the creative people of the world go into hiding.
** Jesus gives The Sermon on the Mount that's known to the world; Galt gives a speech on the radio that's heard the world over.
** Jesus announced in advance at the Last Supper that he would be betrayed by one of his Disciples; Galt tells Dagny in advance while they're at Galt's Gulch that if she continues the way she is going she will betray him.
** Jesus is delivered to his enemies and betrayed by Judas for 30 pieces of silver; Galt is delivered to his enemies and betrayed by Dagny for $500,000.
** Satan offers Jesus the chance to be king of the world if he will accede to his demand to kneel and worship him; Mr. Thompson offers Galt the chance to be economic dictator of the country if he will accede to his demand to get the country off its knees economically.
** Jesus refuses the offer and tells Satan that he has nothing to offer him; Galt refuses the offer and tells Mr. Thompson that he has nothing to offer him.
** Jesus is shown the kingdoms of the world by Satan; Galt is shown to to the world by Mr. Thompson at the Wayne-Falkland hotel.
** Jesus is nailed to a cross; Galt is hooked up to an electric generator.
** His torturers take his clothes. (In both stories.)
** Jesus is crucified; Galt is tortured with electroshock.
** Jesus escapes from his tomb; Galt escapes from the State Science Institute.
** Jesus returns to heaven; Galt returns to Galt's Gulch, the Striker's version of Heaven.
4th May '16 3:00:04 PM Julia1984
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Added DiffLines:

* CanonSue: Rand's style is a celebration of what she feels humanity can be at its greatest moments, and the "good" characters tend to embody that. However, all the heroic characters are believable, possess flaws, are capable of making mistakes, and have sympathetic motives and backstories. The major exception is John Galt, who Rand designed to be perfect and -- to readers who expect characters to be more human than invincible perfection -- comes across as an over-the-top MarySue. He is exactly what Rand intended him to be, and by being so, he specifically fits the description of:
** BlackHoleSue: Everything is about him -- all the heroes worship him and are willing to sacrifice everything to follow and/or protect him, all the villains fear but worship him and want him on their side, and all the world regards him as a LivingLegend. Everyone considers him the embodiment of everything powerful and admirable and is irresistibly drawn to him.
** EinsteinSue: The character the text treats as the personification of perfection and invincible strength is also a super-genius whose inventions include a perpetual motion device and a ray screen that can cover a city in an InvisibilityCloak.
** GodModeSue: Even by in-universe standards, the text portrays him as infinitely smarter and emotionally stronger than any of the other heroes, who worship, follow, and thank him like he's a god.
** RelationshipSue: Rand's notes on what he represents to each character (ex. the man Dagny always wanted to fall in love with, the friend Hank Rearden has always wanted) can be found, among other places, in the novel's Signet Classics edition. They clearly spell out that part of his main purpose was to be the perfect mate for Dagny. After meeting him, Dagny thinks about how he embodies the qualities she always sought in a man but never expected to find in one person and mentally dwells at length on how she's been waiting, hoping, and praying to find him and been working to be worthy of him all her life.
14th Apr '16 4:37:48 PM TheOneWhoTropes
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* MartyStu: The general consensus among non-Rand-fans is that John Galt is one of these. WordOfGod is that he was designed to have no CharacterDevelopment because he was meant to be "perfect", thereby making it impossible for him to be a RoundedCharacter.
6th Apr '16 11:49:56 AM rjd1922
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* {{Sequelitis}}: Both critic and audience reviews went down with each film.

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* {{Sequelitis}}: Both critic and audience reviews went down with each film.film, as did the budgets and the box office gross.
6th Apr '16 11:47:03 AM rjd1922
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Added DiffLines:

* {{Sequelitis}}: Both critic and audience reviews went down with each film.
26th Mar '16 4:41:56 PM MagBas
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* CanonSue: Rand's style is a celebration of what she feels humanity can be at its greatest moments, and the "good" characters tend to embody that. However, all the heroic characters are believable, possess flaws, are capable of making mistakes, and have sympathetic motives and backstories. The major exception is John Galt, who Rand designed to be perfect and -- to readers who expect characters to be more human than invincible perfection -- comes across as an over-the-top MarySue. He is exactly what Rand intended him to be, and by being so, he specifically fits the description of:
** BlackHoleSue: Everything is about him -- all the heroes worship him and are willing to sacrifice everything to follow and/or protect him, all the villains fear but worship him and want him on their side, and all the world regards him as a LivingLegend. Everyone considers him the embodiment of everything powerful and admirable and is irresistibly drawn to him.
** EinsteinSue: The character the text treats as the personification of perfection and invincible strength is also a super-genius whose inventions include a perpetual motion device and a ray screen that can cover a city in an InvisibilityCloak.
** GodModeSue: Even by in-universe standards, the text portrays him as infinitely smarter and emotionally stronger than any of the other heroes, who worship, follow, and thank him like he's a god.
** RelationshipSue: Rand's notes on what he represents to each character (ex. the man Dagny always wanted to fall in love with, the friend Hank Rearden has always wanted) can be found, among other places, in the novel's Signet Classics edition. They clearly spell out that part of his main purpose was to be the perfect mate for Dagny. After meeting him, Dagny thinks about how he embodies the qualities she always sought in a man but never expected to find in one person and mentally dwells at length on how she's been waiting, hoping, and praying to find him and been working to be worthy of him all her life.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=YMMV.AtlasShrugged