History YMMV / AnneOfGreenGables

18th Apr '16 12:10:27 PM Angeldeb82
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* AlternateCharacterInterpretation: Josie Pye is supposed to be an AlphaBitch ([[SmallNameBigEgo in her mind anyway]]) but her bitchy behavior is pretty minor and a few times Anne actually starts it. Plus, characters constantly go on about how awful the Pye girls are and Josie is the youngest. You have to wonder how much of her attitude is a result of being harshly judged based on her family.

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* AlternateCharacterInterpretation: AlternativeCharacterInterpretation: Josie Pye is supposed to be an AlphaBitch ([[SmallNameBigEgo in her mind anyway]]) but her bitchy behavior is pretty minor and a few times Anne actually starts it. Plus, characters constantly go on about how awful the Pye girls are and Josie is the youngest. You have to wonder how much of her attitude is a result of being harshly judged based on her family.



* FixerSue: Basically, just read ''Anne of Windy Poplars'' as Anne being the Fixer Sue for all the people of Summerside and their scene-stealing antics, and the entire book flows much better.



* LesYay: Albeit largely a case of ValuesDissonance -- the stories being set in an era in which gushily sentimental overtones were a standard part of any female friendship -- this can be read into much of Montgomery's work. Anne Shirley and Diana Barry's relationship in the first book hits pretty much every Les Yay button there is. (The 1980s TV version makes it even more obvious.)

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* LesYay: [[HoYay Les Yay]]: Albeit largely a case of ValuesDissonance -- the stories being set in an era in which gushily sentimental overtones were a standard part of any female friendship -- this can be read into much of Montgomery's work. Anne Shirley and Diana Barry's relationship in the first book hits pretty much every Les Yay button there is. (The 1980s TV version makes it even more obvious.)



** Gilbert [[LampShade Lampshades]] this in ''Anne's House of Dreams'', saying, after Anne points out how wasted Leslie's potential is being impoverished and stuck with her idiot husband, that some people would consider a B.A. and burgeoning established magazine writer to be "wasted" as the wife of a poor country doctor.

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** Gilbert [[LampShade Lampshades]] {{Lampshade|Hanging}}s this in ''Anne's House of Dreams'', saying, after Anne points out how wasted Leslie's potential is being impoverished and stuck with her idiot husband, that some people would consider a B.A. and burgeoning established magazine writer to be "wasted" as the wife of a poor country doctor.
10th Feb '16 2:29:05 PM TheMorlock
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* BigLippedAlligatorMoment: The scene where Anne accidentally gets Diana drunk on current wine in the musical. In the book, this incident has major consequences, causing Mrs. Barry to forbid Diana from seeing Anne. In the show, however, the scene merely happens, and is never referred to again, with Mrs. Barry being more-or-less chill about the whole thing. The audience doesn't really care, though, [[RuleOfFunny because it's still pretty funny]].
8th Dec '15 9:31:25 AM TheFuzzinator
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** While undoubtedly well-meant, Marilla's methods for child-rearing, at least before she gets used to Anne and her particular nature, can strike the modern reader as surprisingly rigid and lacking in understanding. Her attitudes reflect both strict Presbyterian values and the Victorian notion that children should be unquestioningly respectful and obedient to their elders to the point of being self-effacing. Early on, she has no qualms about telling Anne to "hold her tongue" when she wants her to be quiet. When Anne tells off Rachel Lynde for criticizing her looks, Marilla is outraged and, while admitting that Rachel is too outspoken, insists that her being "a stranger and an elderly person and my visitor" are "very good reasons" for why Anne should have been respectful to her (despite Rachel having been disrespectful to Anne first), and is adamant that Anne apologize.

to:

** While undoubtedly well-meant, Marilla's methods for child-rearing, at least before she gets used to Anne and her particular nature, can strike the modern reader as surprisingly rigid and lacking in understanding. Her attitudes reflect both strict Presbyterian values and the Victorian notion that children should be unquestioningly respectful and obedient to their elders to the point of being self-effacing. Early on, she has no qualms about telling Anne to "hold her tongue" when she wants her to be quiet. When Anne tells off Rachel Lynde for criticizing her looks, Marilla is outraged and, while admitting that Rachel is too outspoken, insists that her being "a stranger and an elderly person and my visitor" are "very good reasons" for why Anne should have been respectful to her (despite Rachel having been disrespectful to Anne first), and is adamant that Anne apologize. (Though to her credit, her first response is to call out Mrs. Lynde on it.)
28th Sep '15 7:29:05 PM watchfullkittycat32
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* HarsherInHildsight: Killing off Gilbert in ''Anne of Green Gables: A New Beginning'' becomes this since Jonathan Crombie has died.

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* HarsherInHildsight: HarsherInHindsight: Killing off Gilbert in ''Anne of Green Gables: A New Beginning'' becomes this since after Jonathan Crombie has died.
28th Sep '15 7:27:54 PM watchfullkittycat32
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* HarsherInHildsight: Killing off Gilbert in ''Anne of Green Gables: A New Beginning'' becomes this since Jonathan Crombie has died.
15th Aug '15 9:25:58 PM fibee
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***That's more due to Rilla promising that she won't kiss anyone else until his return from war, rather than the actual kiss.
30th Apr '15 11:51:05 PM Adept
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* [[GermansLoveDavidHasselhoff Japan LOVES Anne Shirley]]: The novel has a huge fanbase in Japan, of all places. It's theorised that the idea of a determined little individualist is just that fascinating to female Japanese culture.

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* [[GermansLoveDavidHasselhoff Japan LOVES Anne Shirley]]: GermansLoveDavidHasselhoff: The novel has a huge fanbase in Japan, of all places. It's theorised that the idea of a determined little individualist is just that fascinating to female Japanese culture.



* SuetifulAllAlong: Largely averted. While Anne does go from an impossibly plain and scrawny kid to a tall, slender and beautiful adult beloved of her family and friends, her high intelligence -- plus a tendency 'get into scrapes' -- are both consistently emphasised throughout. It also helps to realise that Anne's appearance was inspired from the get-go by [[http://crookedhouse.typepad.com/crookedhouse/2008/08/once-of-the-man.html this photo of model Evelyn Nesbit]].
** Not to mention the fact that her social enemies still seem to legitimately see her as plain. It's implied throughout many of the books that 'kindred spirits' or 'the race that knows Joseph' are the ones who consider her pretty, being the ones who see her temperament through her physical appearance.
** Plus, of course, she ''grew up'', which probably handled "scrawny".
*** Though at one point a character who quite dislikes her tells her "you're just as skinny as ever", and doesn't mean it as a compliment.
** The environment she grew up in most likely helped as well. Anne spent most of her childhood basically being a nanny or servant for various families who were quite poor. It was only after Marilla and Matthew took her in that she got good clothes, care, food, and education.
** It's explicitly mentioned in the books that most people's views of Anne's looks are dependent on their first impression of her. If told ahead of time that Anne is quite pretty, people are let down by her in real life. If told that Anne is rather plain, people are pleasantly surprised by her looks.
17th Apr '15 4:33:01 PM Jellybean12
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*** "Home children" are mentioned several times throughout the series, and though mention of their being abused is treated negatively, nobody's at all surprised by it. Mary Vance is the most extreme example: the entire neighborhood knew she was being horribly abused by her "caretaker", but nobody bothered to do anything about it. This was, sadly, a real phenomenon in Canada in the 19th and 20th centuries; the most famous example likely being Barnardo homes, which shipped destitute children from Britain to be used as labor on farms in Canada. Many children suffered horrific abuse and neglect at the hands of their adopted families.

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*** "Home children" are mentioned several times throughout the series, and though mention of their being abused is treated negatively, nobody's at all surprised by it. Mary Vance is the most extreme example: the entire neighborhood knew she was being horribly abused by her "caretaker", but nobody bothered to do anything about it. This was, sadly, a real phenomenon in Canada in the 19th and 20th centuries; between the most famous example likely being Barnardo homes, which shipped destitute mid-1800's and the mid-1900's, thousands of children were sent (both legally and illegally) from Britain to Canada to be used as labor on farms in Canada. manual labor. Many children suffered horrific abuse and neglect at the hands of their adopted families. adoptive families.
17th Apr '15 4:26:34 PM Jellybean12
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*** "Home children" are mentioned several times throughout the series, and though mention of their being abused is treated negatively, nobody's at all surprised by it. Mary Vance is the most extreme example: the entire neighborhood knew she was being horribly abused by her "caretaker", but nobody bothered to do anything about it.

to:

*** "Home children" are mentioned several times throughout the series, and though mention of their being abused is treated negatively, nobody's at all surprised by it. Mary Vance is the most extreme example: the entire neighborhood knew she was being horribly abused by her "caretaker", but nobody bothered to do anything about it. This was, sadly, a real phenomenon in Canada in the 19th and 20th centuries; the most famous example likely being Barnardo homes, which shipped destitute children from Britain to be used as labor on farms in Canada. Many children suffered horrific abuse and neglect at the hands of their adopted families.
26th Mar '15 10:17:47 PM toongrrl1990
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* While undoubtedly well-meant, Marilla's methods for child-rearing, at least before she gets used to Anne and her particular nature, can strike the modern reader as surprisingly rigid and lacking in understanding. Her attitudes reflect both strict Presbyterian values and the Victorian notion that children should be unquestioningly respectful and obedient to their elders to the point of being self-effacing. Early on, she has no qualms about telling Anne to "hold her tongue" when she wants her to be quiet. When Anne tells off Rachel Lynde for criticizing her looks, Marilla is outraged and, while admitting that Rachel is too outspoken, insists that her being "a stranger and an elderly person and my visitor" are "very good reasons" for why Anne should have been respectful to her (despite Rachel having been disrespectful to Anne first), and is adamant that Anne apologize.

to:

* ** While undoubtedly well-meant, Marilla's methods for child-rearing, at least before she gets used to Anne and her particular nature, can strike the modern reader as surprisingly rigid and lacking in understanding. Her attitudes reflect both strict Presbyterian values and the Victorian notion that children should be unquestioningly respectful and obedient to their elders to the point of being self-effacing. Early on, she has no qualms about telling Anne to "hold her tongue" when she wants her to be quiet. When Anne tells off Rachel Lynde for criticizing her looks, Marilla is outraged and, while admitting that Rachel is too outspoken, insists that her being "a stranger and an elderly person and my visitor" are "very good reasons" for why Anne should have been respectful to her (despite Rachel having been disrespectful to Anne first), and is adamant that Anne apologize.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=YMMV.AnneOfGreenGables