History YMMV / AllStarBatmanAndRobinTheBoyWonder

21st Feb '18 7:32:06 AM DrakeClawfang
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* DesignatedHero: The Goddamn Batman. He's psychotic, unstable, and an-all round {{Jerkass}}. He kidnaps the twelve year old Dick Grayson, age twelve, after saving him from DirtyCops that were about to kill the boy. Though that doesn't excuse how he forces Grayson to live in the Batcave alone (and expects him to hunt the rats and bats in there for food), and then complains about having Dick around and physically assaults him. He goes out on patrol laughing about how awesome he is as he gleefully poisons criminals, sets them on fire, and attacks a lot of police officers who may or may not be corrupted; while it isn't outright stated, FridgeHorror implies many of the victims of these incidents don't survive the encounter. And he thinks that if he had a power ring like Green Lantern, he would use it to enforce his will on the world and exile Superman from Earth, which is basically the backstory for ''Sinestro'' and the reason he was cast out of the Green Lantern Corps, using a Power Ring for selfish, tyrannical means. Why are readers supposed to like this depiction of Batman, exactly?

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* DesignatedHero: The Goddamn Batman. He's psychotic, unstable, and an-all round {{Jerkass}}. He kidnaps the twelve year old Dick Grayson, age twelve, after saving him from DirtyCops that were about to kill the boy. Though that doesn't excuse how he forces Grayson to live in the Batcave alone (and expects him to hunt the rats and bats in there for food), and then complains about having Dick around and physically assaults him. He goes out on patrol laughing about how awesome he is as he gleefully poisons criminals, sets them on fire, and attacks a lot of police officers who may or may not be corrupted; while it isn't outright stated, FridgeHorror implies many of the victims of these incidents don't survive the encounter. And he thinks that if he had a power ring Power Ring like Green Lantern, he would use it to enforce his will on the world world, destroy (unspecified) enemies of the United States, and exile Superman from Earth, which is basically the backstory for ''Sinestro'' and the reason he was cast out of the Green Lantern Corps, using a Power Ring for selfish, tyrannical means. Why are readers supposed to like this depiction of Batman, exactly?
21st Feb '18 7:31:27 AM DrakeClawfang
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* DesignatedHero: The Goddamn Batman. He's psychotic, unstable, and an-all round {{Jerkass}}. He kidnaps the twelve year old Dick Grayson, age twelve, after saving him from DirtyCops that were about to kill the boy. Though that doesn't excuse how he forces Grayson to live in the Batcave alone (and expects him to hunt the rats and bats in there for food), and then complains about having Dick around and physically assaults him. He goes out on patrol laughing about how awesome he is as he gleefully poisons criminals, sets them on fire, and attacks a lot of police officers who may or may not be corrupted; while it isn't outright stated, FridgeHorror implies many of the victims of these incidents don't survive the encounter. And he thinks that if he had a power ring like Green Lantern, he would use it to enforce his will on the world and exile Superman from Earth. For some reason, readers are supposed to like him.
** Oh, and in case anyone thought that thing with him using the Green Lantern ring to enforce his will on a planet sounds familiar? That's ''Sinestro's'' backstory. One of the biggest villains in the DC Universe. That's literally what Sinestro did to his home planet, which is why he's not a Green Lantern anymore.

to:

* DesignatedHero: The Goddamn Batman. He's psychotic, unstable, and an-all round {{Jerkass}}. He kidnaps the twelve year old Dick Grayson, age twelve, after saving him from DirtyCops that were about to kill the boy. Though that doesn't excuse how he forces Grayson to live in the Batcave alone (and expects him to hunt the rats and bats in there for food), and then complains about having Dick around and physically assaults him. He goes out on patrol laughing about how awesome he is as he gleefully poisons criminals, sets them on fire, and attacks a lot of police officers who may or may not be corrupted; while it isn't outright stated, FridgeHorror implies many of the victims of these incidents don't survive the encounter. And he thinks that if he had a power ring like Green Lantern, he would use it to enforce his will on the world and exile Superman from Earth. For some reason, readers are supposed to like him.
** Oh,
Earth, which is basically the backstory for ''Sinestro'' and in case anyone thought that thing with him using the reason he was cast out of the Green Lantern ring Corps, using a Power Ring for selfish, tyrannical means. Why are readers supposed to enforce his will on a planet sounds familiar? That's ''Sinestro's'' backstory. One like this depiction of the biggest villains in the DC Universe. That's literally what Sinestro did to his home planet, which is why he's not a Green Lantern anymore.Batman, exactly?
21st Feb '18 7:28:27 AM DrakeClawfang
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** A ''lot'' of events in the comic go nowhere and have no importance to anything except for {{Padding}}. Black Canary, Catwoman, Batgirl, Vicki Vale, Jimmy Olsen, and the Justice League, all feature in the series, but across ten issues they each only get one or two scenes in which they do little, if anything, of relevance. Given that Miller consists this series in-canon with his ''Dark Knight Returns'' saga, he's probably including them to build continuity, but the series is ''supposed'' to be about Batman and Robin, yet Miller constantly cuts away to other characters.

to:

** A ''lot'' of events in the comic go nowhere and have no importance to anything except for {{Padding}}. Black Canary, Catwoman, Batgirl, Vicki Vale, Jimmy Olsen, and the Justice League, all feature in the series, but across ten issues they each only get one or two scenes in which they do little, if anything, of relevance. Given that Miller consists considers this series in-canon with his ''Dark Knight Returns'' saga, he's probably including them to build continuity, but the series is ''supposed'' to be about Batman and Robin, yet Miller constantly cuts away to other characters.
21st Feb '18 7:27:56 AM DrakeClawfang
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** A ''lot'' of events in the comic go nowhere and have no importance to anything except for {{Padding}}. Black Canary, Catwoman, Batgirl, Vicki Vale, Jimmy Olsen, and the Justice League, all feature in the series, but across ten issues they each get about two or three scenes in which they do little, if anything, of relevance. It's particularly egregious because the series is ''supposed'' to be about Batman and Robin, but Miller keeps cutting away to other characters.

to:

** A ''lot'' of events in the comic go nowhere and have no importance to anything except for {{Padding}}. Black Canary, Catwoman, Batgirl, Vicki Vale, Jimmy Olsen, and the Justice League, all feature in the series, but across ten issues they each only get about one or two or three scenes in which they do little, if anything, of relevance. It's particularly egregious because Given that Miller consists this series in-canon with his ''Dark Knight Returns'' saga, he's probably including them to build continuity, but the series is ''supposed'' to be about Batman and Robin, but yet Miller keeps cutting constantly cuts away to other characters.
11th Feb '18 2:11:10 PM SithkingZero
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** Oh, and in case anyone thought that thing with him using the Green Lantern ring to enforce his will on a planet sounds familiar? That's ''Sinestro's'' backstory. One of the biggest villains in the DC Universe. That's literally what Sinestro did to his home planet, which is why he's not a Green Lantern anymore.



* WhatAnIdiot: Had Green Lantern had a brain cell in his head, he'd have dismissed Batman's offer to meet him at a time and place of ''his specification'', and just captured him then and there with the power ring on his own terms.

to:

* WhatAnIdiot: Had Green Lantern had a brain cell in his head, he'd have dismissed Batman's offer to meet him at a time and place of ''his specification'', and just captured him then and there with the power ring on his own terms. Or, thinking a little harder, used his ring to manipulate normal objects that ''aren't'' painted yellow, like, say, controlling a normal pair of handcuffs to arrest them, or throwing heavy objects at them (such as bricks).
20th Jan '18 9:50:11 AM BatmanKalEl
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* StealthParody: Some people speculate the comic is intended as this. Though debatable, once you read the comic it is possible to see where they're coming from. Everything is so over the top, edgy, dark, etc. that it's kind of hard to take seriously. The fact that Frank Miller has proven long ago [[ComicBook/BatmanTheDarkKnightReturns that he can write the caped crusader very well]] also leads people to think he was trying to write a parody. One can see this is an over-the-top parody of Robin as the AudienceSurrogate KidSidekick to the NinetiesAntiHero version of Batman, except Miller's references are A) Dated (since comics aren't targeted for kids like the classic Batman ones were), B) Low-Hanging Fruit. The Goddamn Batman as an over-the-top take on "the Batgod" is plausible until you consider the same comic plays it straight with Batman treating the Justice League as hired help, humiliating and insulting Green Lantern, and dismissing Superman as "no one important".
15th Dec '17 11:53:39 PM BeastC
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Added DiffLines:

*** A later comic by Morrison, though, has the Bruce Wayne Batman scold Damian for having a hood in his outfit.
24th Nov '17 10:00:49 PM JulianLapostat
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* StealthParody: Some people speculate the comic is intended as this. Though debatable, once you read the comic it is possible to see where they're coming from. Everything is so over the top, edgy, dark, etc. that it's kind of hard to take seriously. The fact that Frank Miller has proven long ago [[ComicBook/BatmanTheDarkKnightReturns that he can write the caped crusader very well]] also leads people to think he was trying to write a parody. One can see this is an over-the-top parody of Robin as the AudienceSurrogate TeenSidekick to the NinetiesAntiHero version of Batman, except Miller's references are A) Dated (since comics aren't targeted for kids like the classic Batman ones were), B) Low-Hanging Fruit. The Goddamn Batman as an over-the-top take on "the Batgod" is plausible until you consider the same comic plays it straight with Batman treating the Justice League as hired help, humiliating and insulting Green Lantern, and dismissing Superman as "no one important".

to:

* StealthParody: Some people speculate the comic is intended as this. Though debatable, once you read the comic it is possible to see where they're coming from. Everything is so over the top, edgy, dark, etc. that it's kind of hard to take seriously. The fact that Frank Miller has proven long ago [[ComicBook/BatmanTheDarkKnightReturns that he can write the caped crusader very well]] also leads people to think he was trying to write a parody. One can see this is an over-the-top parody of Robin as the AudienceSurrogate TeenSidekick KidSidekick to the NinetiesAntiHero version of Batman, except Miller's references are A) Dated (since comics aren't targeted for kids like the classic Batman ones were), B) Low-Hanging Fruit. The Goddamn Batman as an over-the-top take on "the Batgod" is plausible until you consider the same comic plays it straight with Batman treating the Justice League as hired help, humiliating and insulting Green Lantern, and dismissing Superman as "no one important".
24th Nov '17 10:00:06 PM JulianLapostat
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* StealthParody: Some people speculate the comic is intended as this. Though debatable, once you read the comic it is possible to see where they're coming from. Everything is so over the top, edgy, dark, etc. that it's kind of hard to take seriously. The fact that Frank Miller has proven long ago [[ComicBook/BatmanTheDarkKnightReturns that he can write the caped crusader very well]] also leads people to think he was trying to write a parody. The fact that he's also written stuff like ''ComicBook/HolyTerror'' just blurs things further.

to:

* StealthParody: Some people speculate the comic is intended as this. Though debatable, once you read the comic it is possible to see where they're coming from. Everything is so over the top, edgy, dark, etc. that it's kind of hard to take seriously. The fact that Frank Miller has proven long ago [[ComicBook/BatmanTheDarkKnightReturns that he can write the caped crusader very well]] also leads people to think he was trying to write a parody. The fact that he's also written stuff One can see this is an over-the-top parody of Robin as the AudienceSurrogate TeenSidekick to the NinetiesAntiHero version of Batman, except Miller's references are A) Dated (since comics aren't targeted for kids like ''ComicBook/HolyTerror'' just blurs things further.the classic Batman ones were), B) Low-Hanging Fruit. The Goddamn Batman as an over-the-top take on "the Batgod" is plausible until you consider the same comic plays it straight with Batman treating the Justice League as hired help, humiliating and insulting Green Lantern, and dismissing Superman as "no one important".
5th Oct '17 7:23:01 PM ImperialMajestyXO
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* AlternateCharacterInterpretation:

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* AlternateCharacterInterpretation:AlternativeCharacterInterpretation:



** The 1994 ''Batman/Spawn''[[note]]also written by Frank Miller[[/note]] crossover had Batman riled up at Spawn's lethal methods, vexing him to the point where he chucked a batarang in Spawn's face when Spawn asked to shake hands. At the time it was understandable; in ''ComicBook/BatmanTheDarkKnightReturns'' and ''ComicBook/BatmanYearOne'' he never used lethal force. After his child abusing, cop-killing antics in ''All Star Batman'' his attitude towards Spawn killing seems flat out hypocritical. However, it's completely in line with Miller, as Spawn ''asks'' Batman why ''not'' kill her - and Batman can't think of anything. FacePalm.

to:

** The 1994 ''Batman/Spawn''[[note]]also written by Frank Miller[[/note]] crossover had Batman riled up at Spawn's lethal methods, vexing him to the point where he chucked a batarang in Spawn's face when Spawn ComicBook/{{Spawn}} asked to shake hands. At the time it was understandable; in ''ComicBook/BatmanTheDarkKnightReturns'' and ''ComicBook/BatmanYearOne'' he never used lethal force. After his child abusing, cop-killing antics in ''All Star Batman'' his attitude towards Spawn killing seems flat out hypocritical. However, it's completely in line with Miller, as Spawn ''asks'' Batman why ''not'' kill her - and Batman can't think of anything. FacePalm.
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