History YMMV / AdventuresOfHuckleberryFinn

23rd Jan '16 2:06:05 AM AlleyOop
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** The fact that people can't see the forest for the trees is sad. If the racist culture portrayed in it offends you... ''that's a good thing.'' Racism ''should'' offend you. Twain (although no saint) felt that the racist society of his time/place was sick, and wrote a powerful if veiled polemic against it. Would a ''racist'' book really have its IronWoobie, believing that even ''God'' is prejudiced against his black friend, ''renounce all hope of Heaven'' for ThePowerOfFriendship?


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* MisaimedFandom: Inverted. Sometimes condemned as an unironic endorsement of Civil War-era racism due to its extremely liberal use of the N-word and its somewhat stereotypical portrayal of Jim, despite the fact that the book's primary message is to criticize slavery as inhumane, and that Jim actually subverts many of the contemporary UncleTomfoolery stereotypes. Tellingly of the book's true intent, Huck, believing that even ''God'' is prejudiced against his black friend, renounces all hope of Heaven for ThePowerOfFriendship.
3rd Jul '15 10:19:52 AM ACW
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**Though it's understandable with the former.
5th Feb '15 9:22:36 PM LBHills
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** Both unintentionally, as discussed above, and intentionally in regard to Huck's unwillingness to return Jim to slavery. Huck decides to be a CardCarryingVillain, and most of those around him proclaim themselves good and him evil, but it's made apparent that they're not good, and he's a morally righteous rebel, or at worst a NobleDemon.

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** Both unintentionally, as discussed above, and intentionally in regard to Huck's unwillingness to return Jim to slavery. Huck decides to be a CardCarryingVillain, and most of those around him proclaim themselves good and him evil, but the way it's made apparent written makes it clear that they're not good, and he's a morally righteous rebel, or at worst a NobleDemon.
5th Feb '15 9:20:51 PM LBHills
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** The fact that people can't see the forest for the trees is sad. If the racist culture portrayed in it offends you... ''that's a good thing.'' Racism ''should'' offend you. Twain (although no saint) felt that the racist society of his time/place was sick, and wrote a powerful if veiled polemic against it. Would a ''racist'' book really have its IronWoobie, believing that even ''God'' is prejudiced against the colored, ''renounce all hope of Heaven'' for ThePowerOfFriendship?

to:

** The fact that people can't see the forest for the trees is sad. If the racist culture portrayed in it offends you... ''that's a good thing.'' Racism ''should'' offend you. Twain (although no saint) felt that the racist society of his time/place was sick, and wrote a powerful if veiled polemic against it. Would a ''racist'' book really have its IronWoobie, believing that even ''God'' is prejudiced against the colored, his black friend, ''renounce all hope of Heaven'' for ThePowerOfFriendship?
18th Sep '14 2:54:11 AM LBHills
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** The fact that people can't see the forest for the trees is sad. If the racist culture portrayed in it offends you... ''that's a good thing.'' Racism ''should'' offend you. Twain (although no saint) felt that his racist society was sick, and wrote a powerful if veiled polemic against it. Would a ''racist'' book really have its IronWoobie, believing that even ''God'' is prejudiced against the colored, ''renounce all hope of Heaven'' for ThePowerOfFriendship?

to:

** The fact that people can't see the forest for the trees is sad. If the racist culture portrayed in it offends you... ''that's a good thing.'' Racism ''should'' offend you. Twain (although no saint) felt that his the racist society of his time/place was sick, and wrote a powerful if veiled polemic against it. Would a ''racist'' book really have its IronWoobie, believing that even ''God'' is prejudiced against the colored, ''renounce all hope of Heaven'' for ThePowerOfFriendship?
18th Sep '14 12:44:51 AM LBHills
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Added DiffLines:

** The fact that people can't see the forest for the trees is sad. If the racist culture portrayed in it offends you... ''that's a good thing.'' Racism ''should'' offend you. Twain (although no saint) felt that his racist society was sick, and wrote a powerful if veiled polemic against it. Would a ''racist'' book really have its IronWoobie, believing that even ''God'' is prejudiced against the colored, ''renounce all hope of Heaven'' for ThePowerOfFriendship?
18th Sep '14 12:24:13 AM LBHills
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* EndingFatigue: The story comes to a grinding halt once Jim gets locked in the smokehouse.

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* EndingFatigue: The story comes to a grinding halt once Jim gets locked in the smokehouse.smokehouse - in part because Tom Sawyer, once he finally shows up, seems to be trying to take the book away from Huck.
4th Sep '14 4:27:38 AM SeptimusHeap
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* ComplainingAboutShowsYouDontWatch: Often banned because parents mistakenly believe it is a racist book. They'd know better if they read up to the CMOA.
** Actually, it's been very heavily debated as to whether the book is racist among literary scholars. The major controversy actually relates to the use of language and Jim's portrayal which has been regarded as being a Sambo like characterization, although it has been argued that this is in and of itself a satire.
16th Jun '14 6:55:46 AM Roo
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** And yet some critics have argued that there is some [[RuleOfSymbolism hidden symbolism]] in that Huck and Jim's several arguments [[DoesThisRemindYouOfAnything are actually about slavery]]. In at least one adaptation, it's made blatantly clear that Jim is playing DevilsAdvocate here to encourage Huck to think more for himself instead of uncritically accepting what other people tell him as fact.

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** And yet some critics have argued that there is some [[RuleOfSymbolism hidden symbolism]] in that Huck and Jim's several arguments [[DoesThisRemindYouOfAnything are actually about slavery]]. In at least one adaptation, it's made blatantly clear that Jim is playing DevilsAdvocate here to encourage Huck to think more for himself instead of uncritically accepting what other people tell him as fact.


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** In at least one adaptation, it's made blatantly clear that Jim is playing DevilsAdvocate here to encourage Huck to think more for himself instead of uncritically accepting what other people tell him as fact.
16th Jun '14 6:55:05 AM Roo
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** And yet some critics have argued that there is some [[RuleOfSymbolism hidden symbolism]] in that Huck and Jim's several arguments [[DoesThisRemindYouOfAnything are actually about slavery]].

to:

** And yet some critics have argued that there is some [[RuleOfSymbolism hidden symbolism]] in that Huck and Jim's several arguments [[DoesThisRemindYouOfAnything are actually about slavery]]. In at least one adaptation, it's made blatantly clear that Jim is playing DevilsAdvocate here to encourage Huck to think more for himself instead of uncritically accepting what other people tell him as fact.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=YMMV.AdventuresOfHuckleberryFinn