History WrongGenreSavvy / ComicBooks

6th Feb '16 4:49:52 PM MikeW
Is there an issue? Send a Message
** In flashbacks, we see the young Euless was a weak would-be football player taken under the wing of blind Big. Big plays the role of MagicalNegro to teach Boss how to be a better player, thinking he's the WiseMentor to help Euless escape his criminal father and be a better man. Instead, Euless takes the lesson to be "let nothing stand in your way," agreeing to kill his father in exchange for a crime lord arranging him to be coach of the team and when he muses he'll have to kill the crime lord too, Big realizes he gave the boy the tools and drive to be a monster, causing a literal MyGodWhatHaveIDone.
to:
** In flashbacks, we see the young Euless was a weak would-be football player taken under the wing of blind Big. Big plays the role of MagicalNegro to teach Boss how to be a better player, thinking he's the WiseMentor EccentricMentor to help Euless escape his criminal father and be a better man. Instead, Euless takes the lesson to be "let nothing stand in your way," agreeing to kill his father in exchange for a crime lord arranging him to be coach of the team and when he muses he'll have to kill the crime lord too, Big realizes he gave the boy the tools and drive to be a monster, causing a literal MyGodWhatHaveIDone.
6th Feb '16 4:49:20 PM MikeW
Is there an issue? Send a Message
* A moment of being GenreSavvy ended up being this happened when the Franchise/XMen dealt with Dracula. Yes, using a cross on Drac is a good way to keep him back. But, it really doesn't ''work'' unless you have the ''faith'' behind it, which the very Jewish ComicBook/KittyPryde and the oh-so-unrepentant ComicBook/{{Wolverine}} find out.
to:
* A moment of being GenreSavvy ended up being this happened when the Franchise/XMen dealt with Dracula. Yes, using a cross on Drac is a good way to keep him back. But, it really doesn't ''work'' unless you have the ''faith'' behind it, which the very Jewish ComicBook/KittyPryde and the oh-so-unrepentant ComicBook/{{Wolverine}} find out.out. * In ComicBook/SouthernBastards, Earl thinks he's in a CleanUpTheTown story as the lone guy to take down Euless Boss, the football coach who runs the town and even gets a bat left by his father to do it. Instead [[spoiler: Boss beats Earl to death in the middle of the town and gets away with it as no one is strong enough to testify against him.]] ** In flashbacks, we see the young Euless was a weak would-be football player taken under the wing of blind Big. Big plays the role of MagicalNegro to teach Boss how to be a better player, thinking he's the WiseMentor to help Euless escape his criminal father and be a better man. Instead, Euless takes the lesson to be "let nothing stand in your way," agreeing to kill his father in exchange for a crime lord arranging him to be coach of the team and when he muses he'll have to kill the crime lord too, Big realizes he gave the boy the tools and drive to be a monster, causing a literal MyGodWhatHaveIDone.
10th Nov '15 9:07:57 AM HighCrate
Is there an issue? Send a Message
That's Taught By Experience, not this trope.
* In the weekly series ''ComicBook/FiftyTwo'' Renee Montoya of ''WesternAnimation/BatmanTheAnimatedSeries'' and ''ComicBook/GothamCentral'' is hired by ComicBook/TheQuestion to surveil an old abandoned warehouse. As a veteran of the Major Crimes Unit of the Gotham City Police Department she is very familiar with the process of surveillance and Gotham crime, and is not even surprised when the old warehouse turns out to have a trap door hidden inside...[[GenreShift and then she finds the nightmarish alien thing beyond the trap door and the crates full of laser weaponry]]. Those she did ''not'' see coming.
6th Nov '15 3:43:41 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message
* In the weekly series ''ComicBook/FiftyTwo'' Renee Montoya of ''WesternAnimation/BatmanTheAnimatedSeries'' and ''ComicBook/GothamCentral'' is hired by TheQuestion to surveil an old abandoned warehouse. As a veteran of the Major Crimes Unit of the Gotham City Police Department she is very familiar with the process of surveillance and Gotham crime, and is not even surprised when the old warehouse turns out to have a trap door hidden inside...[[GenreShift and then she finds the nightmarish alien thing beyond the trap door and the crates full of laser weaponry]]. Those she did ''not'' see coming.
to:
* In the weekly series ''ComicBook/FiftyTwo'' Renee Montoya of ''WesternAnimation/BatmanTheAnimatedSeries'' and ''ComicBook/GothamCentral'' is hired by TheQuestion ComicBook/TheQuestion to surveil an old abandoned warehouse. As a veteran of the Major Crimes Unit of the Gotham City Police Department she is very familiar with the process of surveillance and Gotham crime, and is not even surprised when the old warehouse turns out to have a trap door hidden inside...[[GenreShift and then she finds the nightmarish alien thing beyond the trap door and the crates full of laser weaponry]]. Those she did ''not'' see coming.
19th Oct '15 10:18:17 AM HighCrate
Is there an issue? Send a Message
Not An Example as written, unless his mistaken ideas come from in-universe fiction.
* Yet another Garth Ennis example: the ''ComicBook/{{Preacher}}'' spin-off ''The Good Old Boys'' features Cal, who thinks that he's an ActionHero, and that he has BelligerentSexualTension with the female lead that will eventually lead to a LoveEpiphany. Turns out he's actually the ButtMonkey of a BlackComedy with two CorruptHick [[VillainProtagonist villain protagonists]].
to:
* %%* Yet another Garth Ennis example: the ''ComicBook/{{Preacher}}'' spin-off ''The Good Old Boys'' features Cal, who thinks that he's an ActionHero, and that he has BelligerentSexualTension with the female lead that will eventually lead to a LoveEpiphany. Turns out he's actually the ButtMonkey of a BlackComedy with two CorruptHick [[VillainProtagonist villain protagonists]].
18th Oct '15 5:19:52 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message
* Yet another Garth Ennis example: the ''{{Preacher}}'' spin-off ''The Good Old Boys'' features Cal, who thinks that he's an ActionHero, and that he has BelligerentSexualTension with the female lead that will eventually lead to a LoveEpiphany. Turns out he's actually the ButtMonkey of a BlackComedy with two CorruptHick [[VillainProtagonist villain protagonists]].
to:
* Yet another Garth Ennis example: the ''{{Preacher}}'' ''ComicBook/{{Preacher}}'' spin-off ''The Good Old Boys'' features Cal, who thinks that he's an ActionHero, and that he has BelligerentSexualTension with the female lead that will eventually lead to a LoveEpiphany. Turns out he's actually the ButtMonkey of a BlackComedy with two CorruptHick [[VillainProtagonist villain protagonists]].
28th Sep '15 8:22:01 AM HighCrate
Is there an issue? Send a Message
Examples Are Not Arguable, or "potential" either.
* A potential and subtle example in ''Comicbook/ScottPilgrim''. When Scott finally faces Nega-Scott (a shadowy doppleganger who manifests himself during troubling moments for Scott), Scott fights under the belief that if he beats Nega-Scott, he can move on from the past (the savviness comes from Nega-Scott being inspired by Shadow Link, something not unexpected in a world with video game physics). However, [[spoiler: Kim tells Scott he can't run from his mistakes and he needs to accept them. [[EnemyWithout Nega-Scott being a manifestation of Scott's mistakes and Scott's reluctance to confront his fault in them]] (though Gideon's tampering of his memory also contributed heavily, meaning it was partially an ''inability'' to do so. Scott finally acknowledges this and absorbs Nega-Scott.]]
to:
* A potential and subtle example in ''Comicbook/ScottPilgrim''. When Scott finally faces Nega-Scott (a shadowy doppleganger who manifests himself during troubling moments for Scott), Scott fights under the belief that if he beats Nega-Scott, he can move on from the past (the savviness comes from Nega-Scott being inspired by Shadow Link, something not unexpected in a world with video game physics). However, [[spoiler: Kim tells Scott he can't run from his mistakes and he needs to accept them. [[EnemyWithout Nega-Scott being a manifestation of Scott's mistakes and Scott's reluctance to confront his fault in them]] (though Gideon's tampering of his memory also contributed heavily, meaning it was partially an ''inability'' to do so. Scott finally acknowledges this and absorbs Nega-Scott.]]
25th Sep '15 6:37:35 PM DVB
Is there an issue? Send a Message
* A potential and subtle example in ''Comicbook/ScottPilgrim''. When Scott finally faces Nega-Scott (a shadowy doppleganger who manifests himself during troubling moments for Scott), Scott fights under the belief that if he beats Nega-Scott, he can move on from the past (the savviness comes from Nega-Scott being inspired by Shadow Link, something not unexpected in a world with video game physics). However, [[spoiler: Kim tells Scott he can't run from his mistakes and he needs to accept them. [[EnemyWithout Nega-Scott being a manifestation of Scott's mistakes and Scott's reluctance to confront his fault in them (though Gideon's tampering of his memory also contributed heavily, meaning it was partially an ''inability'' to do so. Scott finally acknowledges this and absorbs Nega-Scott.]]
to:
* A potential and subtle example in ''Comicbook/ScottPilgrim''. When Scott finally faces Nega-Scott (a shadowy doppleganger who manifests himself during troubling moments for Scott), Scott fights under the belief that if he beats Nega-Scott, he can move on from the past (the savviness comes from Nega-Scott being inspired by Shadow Link, something not unexpected in a world with video game physics). However, [[spoiler: Kim tells Scott he can't run from his mistakes and he needs to accept them. [[EnemyWithout Nega-Scott being a manifestation of Scott's mistakes and Scott's reluctance to confront his fault in them them]] (though Gideon's tampering of his memory also contributed heavily, meaning it was partially an ''inability'' to do so. Scott finally acknowledges this and absorbs Nega-Scott.]]
25th Sep '15 6:36:42 PM DVB
Is there an issue? Send a Message
* A potential and subtle example in ''Comicbook/ScottPilgrim''. When Scott finally faces Nega-Scott (a shadowy doppleganger who manifests himself during troubling moments for Scott), Scott fights under the belief that if he beats Nega-Scott, he can move on from the past (the savviness comes from Nega-Scott being inspired by Shadow Link, something not unexpected in a world with video game physics). However, Kim explains what it really means (Nega being a manifestation of Scott's mistakes and his unwillingness/inability to face them (Gideon tampered with Scott's memories)), so Scott finally acknowledges this and absorbs Nega-Scott.
to:
* A potential and subtle example in ''Comicbook/ScottPilgrim''. When Scott finally faces Nega-Scott (a shadowy doppleganger who manifests himself during troubling moments for Scott), Scott fights under the belief that if he beats Nega-Scott, he can move on from the past (the savviness comes from Nega-Scott being inspired by Shadow Link, something not unexpected in a world with video game physics). However, [[spoiler: Kim explains what it really means (Nega tells Scott he can't run from his mistakes and he needs to accept them. [[EnemyWithout Nega-Scott being a manifestation of Scott's mistakes and his unwillingness/inability to face them (Gideon tampered with Scott's memories)), so reluctance to confront his fault in them (though Gideon's tampering of his memory also contributed heavily, meaning it was partially an ''inability'' to do so. Scott finally acknowledges this and absorbs Nega-Scott.]]
7th Aug '15 9:49:12 AM HighCrate
Is there an issue? Send a Message
Lots of examples that more properly fit under Genre Blindness.
* Most or even all of the ''ComicBook/{{Watchmen}}'' heroes might be said to be this, except perhaps Dr. Manhattan: The Comedian acted like the hard-bitten, jaded "hero" ([[NinetiesAntiHero or protagonist, at least]]) of a cynical, realpolitik cold war spy story, but comes undone by the horror he discovers and grimly awaits his own murder; Rorschach thinks the heroes are being picked off by an old villain turned far more deadly, back after years for revenge, and if he was in one of the Dark Age of Comics imitations spawned thanks to this series he might be right; Nite-Owl wants to act as if he and Rorschach can be Silver Age heroes again and save the day, their past failures and brutality redeemed by noble victory--but he's in a deconstruction; Silk Spectre's entire worldview is upended by the story's conclusion; and Ozymandias is perhaps the most deluded of all, [[spoiler:insisting he's not a comic-book villain. Technically, he's right, but neither is he a Antivillain doing a terrible thing for the Greater Good: Adrian Veidt is a desperate idealist turned KnightTemplar, his plans likely to be undone at the end of the story, and it's implied it may have all been for nothing anyway]]. Dr. Manhattan, [[BlueAndOrangeMorality though not completely in the right]], is the most aware of the futile story they're actually in. -->'''Manhattan''': We're all puppets, Laurie. I'm just a puppet who can see the strings.

* In the ''WesternAnimation/DonaldDuck'' comic book "Sheriff of Bullet Valley", Donald keeps comparing the present situation to various Western movies he's seen, resulting in his getting everything backward and inadvertently helping the villains.
to:
* In the ''WesternAnimation/DonaldDuck'' comic book book: ** In "Sheriff of Bullet Valley", Donald keeps comparing the present situation to various Western movies he's seen, resulting in his getting everything backward and inadvertently helping the villains.

* In one ''ComicStrip/{{Dilbert}}'' strip, Dogbert finds a magic lamp and summons the GenieInABottle. He expects it to grant him three wishes but the Genie says they don't have a contract and turns him into a wiener. ** At least it was an experience he could [[IncrediblyLamePun relish]]. * Early in ''Comicbook/{{Fables}}'' there was a journalist who discovered that certain New York residents seemed to have been living for centuries without aging. He believed them to be vampires. The residents of Fabletown decided to play along and convinced him he was mind-controlled by them and forced to have sex with a little boy (in reality they knocked him out and took some suggestive photos with him and Pinocchio) and if he told anybody their secret, they'd send the evidence to the police.
to:
* In one ''ComicStrip/{{Dilbert}}'' strip, Dogbert finds a magic lamp and summons the GenieInABottle. He expects it to grant him three wishes but the Genie says they don't have a contract and turns him into a wiener. ** wiener. At least it was an experience he could [[IncrediblyLamePun relish]]. * Early in ''Comicbook/{{Fables}}'' there was a ''Comicbook/{{Fables}}'': ** A journalist who discovered discovers that certain New York residents seemed seem to have been living for centuries without aging. He believed believes them to be vampires. The residents of Fabletown decided decide to play along and convinced convince him he was mind-controlled by them and forced to have sex with a little boy (in reality they knocked him out and took some suggestive photos with him and Pinocchio) and if he told tells anybody their secret, they'd they'll send the evidence to the police.

* In ''ComicBook/{{Irredeemable}}'' Plutonian, being a CaptainErsatz of {{Franchise/Superman}}, was expecting things to turn out in his life like they do in your average {{Superhero}} comic. The problem is that he is not in your average superhero comic, but a {{Deconstruction}} of one. This actually plays a part in what leads to his FaceHeelTurn, after which he becomes DangerouslyGenreSavvy.
to:
* In ''ComicBook/{{Irredeemable}}'' ''ComicBook/{{Irredeemable}}'': ** Plutonian, being a CaptainErsatz of {{Franchise/Superman}}, was is expecting things to turn out in his life like they do in your average {{Superhero}} comic. The problem is that he is not in your average superhero comic, but a {{Deconstruction}} of one. This actually plays a part in what leads to his FaceHeelTurn, after which he becomes DangerouslyGenreSavvy.

* In ''LexLuthorManOfSteel'', SelfDemonstrating/LexLuthor is convinced that he's in a {{Deconstruction}} of the superhero genre where the superhero who is loved and admired by all turns out to be an uncaring and aloof SmugSuper who doesn't care about the little people underneath him, or even a villain hiding in plain sight. Thing is, while Lex is correct that he's in a deconstruction, it's not a deconstruction of Superman -- it's actually a deconstruction of supervillains like ''him''.

* In ''Comicbook/ThePulse'', ''Daily Bugle'' reporter Terri Kidder uses a smokescreen about profiling Norman Osborn to get an interview with him and ask him about the disappearances of [=OsCorp=] personnel. Suffice to say [[NeckLift this doesn't end]] [[NeckSnap well for her.]]
This list shows the last 10 events of 27. Show all.