History Wrestling / WCW

10th Dec '16 3:30:20 PM Warwolf
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** In 1999, WCW forced ReyMysterioJr to lose his mask in a bad match to end a worthless feud. In lucha libre tradition, losing a mask is something that happens very rarely and it is a '''HUGE''' deal, typically a culmination of a very long-running and bitter feud and once unmasked, the liuchador is never supposed to wrestle masked again (luckily, Rey was able to convince Mexican organizations of his great opposition to the match and was given a reprieve). It also didn't help that Rey's masks were the most popular selling mask in the WCW shop and that without it, Rey looked like he was about 13 years old.

to:

** In 1999, WCW forced ReyMysterioJr to lose his mask in a bad match to end a worthless feud. In lucha libre tradition, losing a mask is something that happens very rarely and it is a '''HUGE''' deal, typically a culmination of a very long-running and bitter feud and once unmasked, the liuchador luchador is never supposed to wrestle masked again unless he wins back the right to do so, typically by defeating the guy who originally beat him for his mask. (luckily, Rey was able to convince Mexican organizations of his great opposition to the match and was given a reprieve). It also didn't help that Rey's masks were the most popular selling mask in the WCW shop and that without it, Rey looked like he was about 13 years old.
10th Dec '16 3:26:14 PM Warwolf
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Following a string of creative disasters, control of WCW was handed over to Eric Bischoff. Determined to bring the fight to WWF's doorstep, Ted Turner asked Bischoff what needed to be done in order to compete with the WWF. In response, and thinking it would never happen, Bischoff asked owner Ted Turner to give them Prime time. To Bischoff's great surprise, he was granted two hours on Monday nights to run against longtime Monday night mainstay ''[[Wrestling/WWERaw Monday Night Raw]]''. WCW debuted ''[[Wrestling/WCWMondayNitro Monday Nitro]]'' in 1995. The two shows would trade occasional ratings victories, but WWF was still largely considered the superior product despite WCW acquiring a number of stars who had once wrestled for the WWF including Big Bubba Rogers (Formerly the Big Boss Man), Hacksaw Jim Duggan, Randy Savage and, most notably, Wrestling/HulkHogan.

to:

Following a string of creative disasters, control of WCW was handed over to Eric Bischoff. Determined to bring the fight to WWF's doorstep, Ted Turner asked Bischoff what needed to be done in order to compete with the WWF. In response, and thinking it would never happen, Bischoff asked owner Ted Turner to give them Prime time. To Bischoff's great surprise, he was granted two hours on Monday nights to run against longtime Monday night mainstay ''[[Wrestling/WWERaw Monday Night Raw]]''. WCW debuted ''[[Wrestling/WCWMondayNitro Monday Nitro]]'' in 1995. The two shows would trade occasional ratings victories, but the WWF was still largely considered the superior product despite WCW acquiring a number of stars who had once wrestled for the WWF including Big Bubba Rogers (Formerly the Big Boss Man), Hacksaw Jim Duggan, Randy Savage and, most notably, Wrestling/HulkHogan.
10th Dec '16 3:25:39 PM Warwolf
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Following a string of creative disasters, control of WCW was handed over to Eric Bischoff. Determined to bring the fight to WWF's doorstep, Ted Turner asked Bischoff what needed to be done in order to compete with the WWF. In response, and thinking it would never happen, Bischoff asked owner Ted Turner to give them Prime time. To Bischoff's great surprise, he was granted two hours on Monday nights to run right against longtime monday night mainstay ''[[Wrestling/WWERaw Monday Night Raw]]''. WCW debuted ''[[Wrestling/WCWMondayNitro Monday Nitro]]'' in 1995.

WCW's fortunes didn't really pick up, however, until Wrestling/ScottHall and Wrestling/KevinNash (Razor Ramon and Diesel in the WWF) defected to WCW, teasing at a "third member" of their group. At the ''Bash at the Beach '96'' event, the Outsiders were booked to face Wrestling/{{Sting}} and two other babyfaces. Wrestling/HulkHogan (recruited by Bischoff in '94 as an act of open war) suddenly came to Sting's aid... or so it seemed. [[CavalryBetrayal Instead, Hulk turned on him]], thus revealing himself as the third man. Following Hogan's now-infamous promo, the [[Wrestling/NewWorldOrder nWo]] was born. This period, known as the Wrestling/MondayNightWars, resulted in a huge surge in popularity (and financial success) for the wrestling industry in the late 1990s.

to:

Following a string of creative disasters, control of WCW was handed over to Eric Bischoff. Determined to bring the fight to WWF's doorstep, Ted Turner asked Bischoff what needed to be done in order to compete with the WWF. In response, and thinking it would never happen, Bischoff asked owner Ted Turner to give them Prime time. To Bischoff's great surprise, he was granted two hours on Monday nights to run right against longtime monday Monday night mainstay ''[[Wrestling/WWERaw Monday Night Raw]]''. WCW debuted ''[[Wrestling/WCWMondayNitro Monday Nitro]]'' in 1995.

1995. The two shows would trade occasional ratings victories, but WWF was still largely considered the superior product despite WCW acquiring a number of stars who had once wrestled for the WWF including Big Bubba Rogers (Formerly the Big Boss Man), Hacksaw Jim Duggan, Randy Savage and, most notably, Wrestling/HulkHogan.

WCW's fortunes didn't really pick up, however, until Wrestling/ScottHall and Wrestling/KevinNash (Razor Ramon and Diesel in the WWF) defected to WCW, WCW and began running roughshod over the company's talent for weeks before challenging three of WCW's top stars to a match, teasing at a "third member" of their group. group who would debut if their challenge was accepted. WCW took them up on it and the match was set for WCW's primary summer pay per view. At the ''Bash at the Beach '96'' event, the Outsiders and their still then unknown mystery partner were booked to face Wrestling/{{Sting}} Wrestling/{{Sting}}, Lex Luger, and Randy Savage. Despite claiming the third man was present at the event, only the Outsiders showed up for the match and took on Sting, Luger, and Savage in a two other babyfaces. Wrestling/HulkHogan (recruited by Bischoff in '94 as an act on three situation, but soon evened the odds down to 2-2 when Luger was seemingly taken out of open war) the fight, leaving Savage and Sting to face the Outsiders. Hogan suddenly came to Sting's aid... or so it seemed. [[CavalryBetrayal Instead, Hulk turned on him]], thus revealing himself as the third man. Following Hogan's now-infamous promo, the [[Wrestling/NewWorldOrder nWo]] was born. This period, known as the Wrestling/MondayNightWars, resulted in a huge surge in popularity (and financial success) for the wrestling industry in the late 1990s.
10th Dec '16 3:19:04 PM Warwolf
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Following a string of creative disasters, control of WCW was handed over to Eric Bischoff. Determined to bring the fight to WWF's doorstep, he asked owner Ted Turner to give them a timeslot right alongside ''[[Wrestling/WWERaw Monday Night Raw]]''. Turner relented, and WCW debuted ''[[Wrestling/WCWMondayNitro Monday Nitro]]'' in 1995.

to:

Following a string of creative disasters, control of WCW was handed over to Eric Bischoff. Determined to bring the fight to WWF's doorstep, he Ted Turner asked Bischoff what needed to be done in order to compete with the WWF. In response, and thinking it would never happen, Bischoff asked owner Ted Turner to give them a timeslot Prime time. To Bischoff's great surprise, he was granted two hours on Monday nights to run right alongside against longtime monday night mainstay ''[[Wrestling/WWERaw Monday Night Raw]]''. Turner relented, and WCW debuted ''[[Wrestling/WCWMondayNitro Monday Nitro]]'' in 1995.
20th Aug '16 10:29:53 PM htuttle
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** WCW began as a regional promotion which was closely affiliated with the Wrestling/NationalWrestlingAlliance. The "World Championship Wrestling" name was used in various forms by various promotions affiliated with the NWA.
** The name "World Championship Wrestling" was first used as a brand and television show title in 1974. Jim Barnett (who had worked for a promotion named "World Championship Wrestling" in Australia) came to Atlanta during a power struggle over the NWA Georgia territory. Barnett ultimately became majority owner and began using the old territory name for his new TV show in 1975.
** The name "WCt was not until December 21, 1976 that an actual, Wrestling/NationalWrestlingAlliance (NWA)-affiliated promotion called "World Championship Wrestling" appeared on the national scene. This entity was under the ownership of media mogul and cable TV pioneer Ted Turner, based in Atlanta, Georgia. While initially the new company was called Universal Wrestling Corporation after its launch in October 11, 1973; very shortly following the purchase the decision was made to utilize the familiar "World Championship Wrestling" TV show name as the brand name for this new promotion. By mid-1989 all the NWA branding was replaced with WCW.

to:

** WCW began as a regional promotion which was closely affiliated with the Wrestling/NationalWrestlingAlliance. The "World Championship Wrestling" name was used in various forms by various promotions affiliated with the NWA.
** The name "World Championship Wrestling" was first used
NWA, starting as a brand and television show title in 1974. Jim Barnett (who had worked for a promotion named "World Championship Wrestling" in Australia) came to Atlanta during a power struggle over the NWA Georgia territory. Barnett ultimately became majority owner and began using the old territory name for his the new TV show in 1975.
show.
** The name "WCt It was not until December 21, 1976 that an actual, Wrestling/NationalWrestlingAlliance (NWA)-affiliated promotion called "World Championship Wrestling" appeared on the national scene. This entity was under the ownership of media mogul and cable TV pioneer Ted Turner, based in Atlanta, Georgia. While initially the new company was called Universal Wrestling Corporation after its launch in October 11, 1973; very shortly following the purchase the decision was made to utilize the familiar "World Championship Wrestling" TV show name as the brand name for this new promotion. By mid-1989 all the NWA branding was replaced with WCW.
18th Aug '16 8:41:09 PM htuttle
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* GimmickMatch: In the promotion's early years as WCW, it was horribly mismanaged and written by people who had no idea what wrestling fans wanted to see, relying on stunts and gimmicks to capture the glamour and flash of the WWF: such "matches" included a live appearance by Franchise/RoboCop [!] at a pay-per-view event, and the infamous [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Black_Scorpion_(professional_wrestling) Black Scorpion]] mystery.

to:

* GimmickMatch: GimmickMatches: In the promotion's early years as WCW, it was horribly mismanaged and written by people who had no idea what wrestling fans wanted to see, relying on stunts and gimmicks to capture the glamour and flash of the WWF: such "matches" included a live appearance by Franchise/RoboCop [!] at a pay-per-view event, and the infamous [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Black_Scorpion_(professional_wrestling) Black Scorpion]] mystery.
18th Aug '16 8:38:10 PM htuttle
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WCW's fortunes didn't really pick up, however, until Wrestling/ScottHall and Wrestling/KevinNash (Razor Ramon and Diesel in the WWF) defected to WCW, teasing at a "third member" of their group. At the ''Bash at the Beach '96'' event, the Outsiders were booked to face Wrestling/{{Sting}} and two other babyfaces. Wrestling/HulkHogan (recruited Bischoff in '94 as an act of open war) suddenly came to Sting's aid... or so it seemed. [[CavalryBetrayal Instead, Hulk turned on him]], thus revealing himself as the third man. Following Hogan's now-infamous promo, the [[Wrestling/NewWorldOrder nWo]] was born. This period, known as the Wrestling/MondayNightWars, resulted in a huge surge in popularity (and financial success) for the wrestling industry in the late 1990s.

to:

WCW's fortunes didn't really pick up, however, until Wrestling/ScottHall and Wrestling/KevinNash (Razor Ramon and Diesel in the WWF) defected to WCW, teasing at a "third member" of their group. At the ''Bash at the Beach '96'' event, the Outsiders were booked to face Wrestling/{{Sting}} and two other babyfaces. Wrestling/HulkHogan (recruited by Bischoff in '94 as an act of open war) suddenly came to Sting's aid... or so it seemed. [[CavalryBetrayal Instead, Hulk turned on him]], thus revealing himself as the third man. Following Hogan's now-infamous promo, the [[Wrestling/NewWorldOrder nWo]] was born. This period, known as the Wrestling/MondayNightWars, resulted in a huge surge in popularity (and financial success) for the wrestling industry in the late 1990s.
18th Aug '16 8:37:47 PM htuttle
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WCW's fortunes didn't really pick up, however, until Wrestling/ScottHall and Wrestling/KevinNash (Razor Ramon and Diesel in the WWF) defected to WCW, teasing at a "third member" of their group. At the ''Bash at the Beach '96'' event, the Outsiders were booked to face Wrestling/{{Sting}} and two other babyfaces. Wrestling/HulkHogan (recruited to work for WCW in 1994 by Bischoff as one of his acts of open war on the WWF) suddenly appeared in the ring, apparently coming to Sting's aid. [[CavalryBetrayal Instead, Hulk turned on him]], thus revealing himself as the third member of the group. Following Hogan's now-infamous promo, the [[Wrestling/NewWorldOrder nWo]] was born. This period, known as the Wrestling/MondayNightWars, resulted in a huge surge in popularity (and financial success) for the wrestling industry in the late 1990s.

to:

WCW's fortunes didn't really pick up, however, until Wrestling/ScottHall and Wrestling/KevinNash (Razor Ramon and Diesel in the WWF) defected to WCW, teasing at a "third member" of their group. At the ''Bash at the Beach '96'' event, the Outsiders were booked to face Wrestling/{{Sting}} and two other babyfaces. Wrestling/HulkHogan (recruited to work for WCW in 1994 by Bischoff in '94 as one of his acts an act of open war on the WWF) war) suddenly appeared in the ring, apparently coming came to Sting's aid. aid... or so it seemed. [[CavalryBetrayal Instead, Hulk turned on him]], thus revealing himself as the third member of the group.man. Following Hogan's now-infamous promo, the [[Wrestling/NewWorldOrder nWo]] was born. This period, known as the Wrestling/MondayNightWars, resulted in a huge surge in popularity (and financial success) for the wrestling industry in the late 1990s.



1998 saw other bad decisions that accelerated the decline: At ''Starrcade '98'', Nash defeated Goldberg after Goldberg was tazed by Hall to claim the World Heavyweight Championship, which also ended Goldberg's "undefeated" streak. Eight days later on ''Nitro'', Nash and Hogan were scheduled to have a match for said title, but instead, Nash took a poke to the chest from Hogan and sold it like he'd been shot with a cannon, lying down on the mat. This incident, plainly [[WagTheDirector orchestrated]] by Hogan behind-the-scenes, came to be known by all as the {{Fingerpoke of Doom}}.

to:

1998 saw other bad decisions that accelerated the decline: At ''Starrcade '98'', Nash defeated Goldberg after Goldberg was tazed by Hall to claim the World Heavyweight Championship, which also ended Goldberg's "undefeated" streak. his undefeated "streak." Eight days later on ''Nitro'', Nash and Hogan were scheduled to have a match for said title, but instead, Nash took a poke to the chest from Hogan and sold it like he'd been shot with a cannon, lying down on the mat. This incident, plainly [[WagTheDirector orchestrated]] by Hogan behind-the-scenes, came to be known by all as the {{Fingerpoke of Doom}}.
18th Aug '16 8:34:16 PM htuttle
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!!Origins
The name "World Championship Wrestling" was first used as a brand and television show title in 1974. Jim Barnett (who had worked for a promotion named World Championship Wrestling in Australia) came to Atlanta in the 1970s during an internal struggle over the NWA Georgia territory. Barnett ultimately became majority owner of the promotion/"territory", and began using his previous promotion's name for his new business' television program in 1975. The business was eventually purchased by Jim Crockett Promotions.

However, it was not until December 21, 1976 that an actual, Wrestling/NationalWrestlingAlliance (NWA)-affiliated promotion called "World Championship Wrestling" appeared on the national scene. This entity was under the ownership of media mogul and cable TV pioneer Ted Turner, based in Atlanta, Georgia. While initially the new company was called Universal Wrestling Corporation after its launch in October 11, 1973; very shortly following the purchase the decision was made to utilize the familiar "World Championship Wrestling" TV show name as the brand name for this new promotion. By mid-1989 all the NWA branding was replaced with WCW.

In the promotion's early years as WCW, it was horribly mismanaged and written by people who had no idea what wrestling fans wanted to see, relying on [[GimmickMatches stunts and gimmicks]] to capture the glamour and flash of the WWF: such "matches" included a live appearance by Franchise/RoboCop [!] at a pay-per-view event, and the infamous [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Black_Scorpion_(professional_wrestling) Black Scorpion]] mystery. Following a string of creative disasters, control was handed over to Eric Bischoff (whose promotion from announcer to '''[[YouAreInCommandNow Executive Vice President]]''' of the company led co-announcer Wrestling/JimRoss to quit in disgust and join WWF, a decision that very few would question these days) in 1993. From then on, Bischoff would take the fight straight to the WWF's front doorstep.



Bischoff asked Turner to give them a timeslot right alongside the WWF's ''[[Wrestling/WWERaw Monday Night Raw]]''. Turner relented, and WCW debuted ''[[Wrestling/WCWMondayNitro Monday Nitro]]'' in 1995; Bischoff decided to take advantage of the time slot by airing the show live every week and, in several instances, giving away the results of WWF shows which were often taped weeks in advance.

WCW's fortunes didn't really pick up, however, until Wrestling/ScottHall and Wrestling/KevinNash (Razor Ramon and Diesel in the WWF) defected to WCW. People wondered if they were actually under contract to WCW or if they'd been sent by the WWF to "invade" the promotion. Bischoff ran with this and labeled Hall and Nash "The Outsiders", booking it as though they were looking to destroy WCW from the inside out. But they weren't alone: Hall and Nash teased a "third member" of their group. At the ''Bash at the Beach '96'' event, the Outsiders were booked to face Wrestling/{{Sting}} and two other babyfaces. Eventually, Wrestling/HulkHogan (recruited to work for WCW in 1994 by Bischoff as one of his acts of open war on the WWF) came out to the ring, looking as if he was coming to Sting's aid. [[CavalryBetrayal Instead, he turned on them]], thus revealing that he was the third member of the group. Following Hogan's now-famous post-match promo, the [[Wrestling/NewWorldOrder nWo]] was born.

This period, known as the Wrestling/MondayNightWars, resulted in a huge surge in popularity (and financial success) for the wrestling industry in the late 1990s.

to:

Bischoff Following a string of creative disasters, control of WCW was handed over to Eric Bischoff. Determined to bring the fight to WWF's doorstep, he asked owner Ted Turner to give them a timeslot right alongside the WWF's ''[[Wrestling/WWERaw Monday Night Raw]]''. Turner relented, and WCW debuted ''[[Wrestling/WCWMondayNitro Monday Nitro]]'' in 1995; Bischoff decided to take advantage of the time slot by airing the show live every week and, in several instances, giving away the results of WWF shows which were often taped weeks in advance.

1995.

WCW's fortunes didn't really pick up, however, until Wrestling/ScottHall and Wrestling/KevinNash (Razor Ramon and Diesel in the WWF) defected to WCW. People wondered if they were actually under contract to WCW or if they'd been sent by the WWF to "invade" the promotion. Bischoff ran with this and labeled Hall and Nash "The Outsiders", booking it as though they were looking to destroy WCW from the inside out. But they weren't alone: Hall and Nash teased WCW, teasing at a "third member" of their group. At the ''Bash at the Beach '96'' event, the Outsiders were booked to face Wrestling/{{Sting}} and two other babyfaces. Eventually, Wrestling/HulkHogan (recruited to work for WCW in 1994 by Bischoff as one of his acts of open war on the WWF) came out to suddenly appeared in the ring, looking as if he was apparently coming to Sting's aid. [[CavalryBetrayal Instead, he Hulk turned on them]], him]], thus revealing that he was himself as the third member of the group. Following Hogan's now-famous post-match now-infamous promo, the [[Wrestling/NewWorldOrder nWo]] was born.

born. This period, known as the Wrestling/MondayNightWars, resulted in a huge surge in popularity (and financial success) for the wrestling industry in the late 1990s.



By this point, WCW had not only managed to secure a second major show in ''Thunder'', but it was building up a new megastar in Wrestling/{{Goldberg}}. His biggest victory came in 1998, where he defeated "Hollywood" Hogan for the World Heavyweight Championship... on a weekly episode of ''Nitro''. The match helped give WCW its last major ratings victory against the WWF; it also cost them millions in pay-per-view revenue. This exposed [[DidntThinkThisThrough a major structural flaw]] in Bischoff's business model, one which would eventually bring the company down.

1998 saw other bad decisions that accelerated the decline: At ''Starrcade '98'', Nash defeated Goldberg after Goldberg was tazed by Hall to claim the World Heavyweight Championship, which also ended Goldberg's undefeated streak. Eight days later on ''Nitro'', Nash and Hogan were scheduled to have a match for said title, but instead, Nash took a poke to the chest from Hogan and sold it like he'd been shot with a cannon, lying down on the mat. This incident, plainly orchestrated by Hogan behind-the-scenes, came to be known by all as the {{Fingerpoke of Doom}}.

Prior to this limp "main event", announcer Tony Schiavone, per Bischoff's orders, revealed that fan-favorite [[Wrestling/MickFoley Mick "Mankind" Foley]] would be winning the WWF Championship on a pre-taped edition of ''Raw'' ("''That's'' gonna put some butts in the seats, heh!"), essentially inviting over ''half a million viewers to change the channel'' -- [[HoistByHisOwnPetard which they did.]] You can read all about the incident, and its impact on both WCW and the WWF, on [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fingerpoke_of_Doom That Other Wiki]]).

to:

By this point, WCW had not only managed to secure a second major show in ''Thunder'', but it was building up a new megastar in Wrestling/{{Goldberg}}. His biggest victory came in 1998, where when he finally defeated "Hollywood" Hogan for the World Heavyweight Championship... on a weekly episode of ''Nitro''. The match helped give WCW its gave Bischoff his last major ratings victory against the WWF; it also cost them him millions in pay-per-view revenue. This exposed [[DidntThinkThisThrough a major structural flaw]] in Bischoff's business model, one which would eventually bring the company down.

1998 saw other bad decisions that accelerated the decline: At ''Starrcade '98'', Nash defeated Goldberg after Goldberg was tazed by Hall to claim the World Heavyweight Championship, which also ended Goldberg's undefeated "undefeated" streak. Eight days later on ''Nitro'', Nash and Hogan were scheduled to have a match for said title, but instead, Nash took a poke to the chest from Hogan and sold it like he'd been shot with a cannon, lying down on the mat. This incident, plainly orchestrated [[WagTheDirector orchestrated]] by Hogan behind-the-scenes, came to be known by all as the {{Fingerpoke of Doom}}.

Prior to this limp [[NeverTrustATrailer "main event", event"]], announcer Tony Schiavone, per Bischoff's orders, revealed that fan-favorite [[Wrestling/MickFoley Mick "Mankind" Foley]] would be winning the WWF Championship on a pre-taped edition of ''Raw'' ("''That's'' gonna put some butts in the seats, heh!"), essentially inviting over ''half a million viewers to change the channel'' -- [[HoistByHisOwnPetard which they did.]] did. You can read all about the incident, and its impact on both WCW and the WWF, on [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fingerpoke_of_Doom That Other Wiki]]).



Following the ''Starrcade'' debacle, WCW tried desperately to reinvent itself. Wrestling/VinceRusso, ostensibly the "brains" behind the WWF's Wrestling/AttitudeEra, was brought in as booker. In an attempt to appease the locker room, Wrestling/ChrisBenoit was booked to win the World Heavyweight Championship at ''Souled Out 2000''. However, this didn't do enough to satisfy him, and Benoit [[TakeThisJobAndShoveIt gave the belt back]] [!] and signed on with WWF the very next day. Wrestling/PerrySaturn, Wrestling/DeanMalenko, and Wrestling/EddieGuerrero soon followed; all four debuted on ''Raw'' two weeks later as "The Radicalz".

With the company hemorrhaging money, Time Warner went into panic mode and took a more active role in WCW; the storyline was "reset" in April 2000, splitting the company into two factions: the "New Blood" (younger, newer stars) and the "Millionaires' Club" (older stars such as Nash and Hogan). Unfortunately, this was perceived as [[ItsTheSameNowItSucks a rehash of the nWo vs. WCW feud]], and many fans never got it. It didn't help that the older stars were booked as faces and the New Blood were booked as heels. Unorthodox, illogical, and just plain stupid angles continued as WCW slid into a resigning [[WhoWouldWantToWatchUs self-parody]], with the final straw for many fans being the crowning of actor David Arquette as the company's world champion.

to:

Following the ''Starrcade'' debacle, WCW tried desperately to reinvent itself. Wrestling/VinceRusso, ostensibly Wrestling/VinceRusso (credited as the "brains" behind the WWF's Wrestling/AttitudeEra, Wrestling/AttitudeEra) was brought in as booker. In an attempt to appease the locker room, at re-invention, Wrestling/ChrisBenoit was booked to win the World Heavyweight Championship at ''Souled Out 2000''. However, this didn't do enough to satisfy him, and so Benoit [[TakeThisJobAndShoveIt gave the belt back]] [!] and signed on with WWF the very next day. Wrestling/PerrySaturn, Wrestling/DeanMalenko, and Wrestling/EddieGuerrero soon followed; all four debuted on ''Raw'' two weeks later as "The Radicalz".

With the company hemorrhaging money, Time Warner went into panic mode and [[ExecutiveMeddling took a more active role role]] in WCW; the storyline was "reset" in April 2000, splitting the company into two factions: the "New Blood" (younger, newer stars) and the "Millionaires' Club" (older stars such as like Nash and Hogan). Unfortunately, this was perceived as [[ItsTheSameNowItSucks a rehash of the nWo vs. WCW feud]], and many fans never got it. It didn't help that the older stars were booked as faces and the New Blood were booked as heels. heels (?), which later became Russo's [[SignatureStyle signature]] in the years to follow. Unorthodox, illogical, and just plain stupid angles continued as WCW slid into a resigning [[WhoWouldWantToWatchUs self-parody]], with the final straw for many fans being the crowning of actor David Arquette as the company's world champion.
World Champion.



After Time Warner merged with AOL, they discovered that WCW had become little more than a colossal money pit (and Turner was no longer in a position to protect the promotion- he had left the company once he realized that the AOL deal wasn't gonna work out), so they immediately started cutting budgets. Eventually, WCW found itself on the chopping block, and it was ultimately sold to the WWF in early 2001 (weeks before [[Wrestling/WrestleMania WrestleMania X-Seven]]) at what amounted to fire-sale prices, just days before the final ''Monday Nitro''. (The WWF made tentative plans to revive it as a wholly separate "promotion" under the WWF umbrella (as teased in the "[=InVasion=]" angle); but when Creator/{{UPN}} glanced at WCW's books, they decided they wanted ''nothing'' to with the toxic brand, and those plans were scrapped.) WCW stuck around in name only as the company's titles were all eventually unified with their WWF counterparts, ending with the unification of the WCW and WWF Championships at Vengeance 2001 into the WWF Undisputed Championship. Ironically, the man who unified the titles was the first major WCW-to-WWF defection during the Monday Night Wars: Wrestling/ChrisJericho, who defeated both [[Wrestling/DwayneJohnson The Rock]] and Wrestling/StoneColdSteveAustin in the same night - in back-to-back matches, no less! - to unify the two titles.

With both WCW and Wrestling/{{ECW}} (which had gone out of business just a couple of months prior) in their back pockets, the WWF was left as the lone major professional wrestling promotion in the United States.

to:

After Time Warner merged with AOL, they discovered that WCW had become little more than a colossal money pit (and Turner was no longer in a position to protect the promotion- he had left the company once he realized that the AOL deal wasn't gonna work out), so they immediately started cutting budgets. Eventually, WCW found itself on the chopping block, and it was ultimately eventually sold to the WWF in early 2001 (weeks before [[Wrestling/WrestleMania WrestleMania X-Seven]]) at what amounted to fire-sale prices, just mere days before the final ''Monday Nitro''. (The WWF made tentative plans to revive it as a wholly separate "promotion" under the WWF umbrella (as teased in the "[=InVasion=]" angle); but when Creator/{{UPN}} glanced at WCW's books, they decided they wanted ''nothing'' to with the toxic brand, and those plans were scrapped.) WCW stuck around in {{in name only only}} as the company's titles were all eventually unified with their WWF counterparts, ending culminating with the unification of the WCW and WWF Championships at Vengeance 2001 into the WWF ''Vengeance 2001'' (the "WWF Undisputed Championship. Ironically, the man who unified the titles was the first major WCW-to-WWF defection during the Monday Night Wars: Wrestling/ChrisJericho, who defeated both [[Wrestling/DwayneJohnson The Rock]] and Wrestling/StoneColdSteveAustin in the same night - in back-to-back matches, no less! - to unify the two titles.

Championship"). With both WCW and Wrestling/{{ECW}} (which had gone out of business just a couple of months prior) in their back pockets, the WWF was left as the lone major professional wrestling promotion in the United States.



* WCW World Heavyweight Championship. It was defended on WWE programming until it was merged with the WWE Championship to become the Undisputed WWE Championship.
* The WCW Cruiserweight Championsip. It was defended in WWE before its retirement in 2008.
* The WCW United States Championship. It is currently being used in WWE.
* The WCW World Tag Team Championship. Were defended on WWE programming, and later retired when merged with the WWE (World) Tag Team Titles
* The WCW Cruiserweight Tag Team Championship. After WWE's purchase of WCW, this was one of two titles to be abandoned and never be defended on WWE programming.
* The WCW Hardcore Championship. Much like the Cruiserweight Tag Team titles, after WCW closed, it was also abandoned and never be defended on WWE programming.

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* WCW '''WCW World Heavyweight Championship.Championship'''. It was defended on WWE programming until it was merged with the WWE Championship to become the Undisputed WWE Championship.
* The WCW '''WCW Cruiserweight Championsip.Championsip'''. It was defended in WWE before its retirement in 2008.
* The WCW '''WCW United States Championship.Championship'''. It is currently being used in WWE.
* The WCW '''WCW World Tag Team Championship.Championship'''. Were defended on WWE programming, and later retired when merged with the WWE (World) Tag Team Titles
* The WCW '''WCW Cruiserweight Tag Team Championship.Championship'''. After WWE's purchase of WCW, this was one of two titles to be abandoned and never be defended on WWE programming.
* The WCW '''WCW Hardcore Championship.Championship'''. Much like the Cruiserweight Tag Team titles, after WCW closed, it was also abandoned and never be defended on WWE programming.



* ArtifactTitle: WCW began as a regional promotion which was closely affiliated with the Wrestling/NationalWrestlingAlliance. The "World Championship Wrestling" name was used in various forms by various promotions affiliated with the NWA. When Ted Turner purchased JCP, the company began using the name WCW full-time. Turner was bought out by Time Warner in 1996; WCW's association with the NWA was dissolved in 1991, which resulted in the NWA's World Heavyweight Championship becoming a WCW belt, as WCW owned it (the "Big Gold Belt", as it came to be known); it once served as the WWE World Heavyweight Championship before being officially retired in 2014.

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* ArtifactTitle: ArtifactTitle:
**
WCW began as a regional promotion which was closely affiliated with the Wrestling/NationalWrestlingAlliance. The "World Championship Wrestling" name was used in various forms by various promotions affiliated with the NWA. When Ted Turner purchased JCP, NWA.
** The name "World Championship Wrestling" was first used as a brand and television show title in 1974. Jim Barnett (who had worked for a promotion named "World Championship Wrestling" in Australia) came to Atlanta during a power struggle over
the company NWA Georgia territory. Barnett ultimately became majority owner and began using the old territory name WCW full-time. for his new TV show in 1975.
** The name "WCt was not until December 21, 1976 that an actual, Wrestling/NationalWrestlingAlliance (NWA)-affiliated promotion called "World Championship Wrestling" appeared on the national scene. This entity was under the ownership of media mogul and cable TV pioneer Ted Turner, based in Atlanta, Georgia. While initially the new company was called Universal Wrestling Corporation after its launch in October 11, 1973; very shortly following the purchase the decision was made to utilize the familiar "World Championship Wrestling" TV show name as the brand name for this new promotion. By mid-1989 all the NWA branding was replaced with WCW.
**
Turner was bought out by Time Warner in 1996; WCW's association with the NWA was dissolved in 1991, which resulted in the NWA's World Heavyweight Championship becoming a WCW belt, as WCW owned it (the "Big Gold Belt", as it came to be known); it once served as the WWE World Heavyweight Championship before being officially retired in 2014.



* BittersweetEnding: In 1994, when Hulk Hogan entered WCW, he pretty much insisted on going over all the top guys, including Ric Flair and Wrestling/{{Vader}}. This despite the fact that, although Hogan was the most recognized wrestler in the world at one time, he was a new face in the WCW locker room. Then the nWo hit it big, but unfortunately, none of the nWo (read: WWF) guys wanted to job to the WCW guys, so the "invasion" was pretty much a landslide victory for the nWo. By late 2001, Hogan was finally driven away by Russo and Nash was marking time until his contract was bought out by the new owners, the WWF. In the last episode, ''The Night of Champions'', it was back to where it should be: Booker T won the world title, and the show capped with a sparring match between Flair and Sting, two WCW oldies who had stuck wth the promotion to the bitter end. Post-match, Sting and Flair embraced and shook hands -- a genuine babyface ending.

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* BittersweetEnding: BittersweetEnding:
**
In 1994, when Hulk Hogan entered WCW, he pretty much insisted on going over all the top guys, including Ric Flair and Wrestling/{{Vader}}. This despite the fact that, although Hogan was the most recognized wrestler in the world at one time, he was a new face in the WCW locker room. Then the nWo hit it big, but unfortunately, none of the nWo (read: WWF) guys wanted to job to the WCW guys, so the "invasion" was pretty much a landslide victory for the nWo. By late 2001, Hogan was finally driven away by Russo and Nash was marking time until his contract was bought out by the new owners, the WWF. In the last episode, ''The Night of Champions'', it was back to where it should be: Booker T won the world title, and the show capped with a sparring match between Flair and Sting, two WCW oldies who had stuck wth the promotion to the bitter end. Post-match, Sting and Flair embraced and shook hands -- a genuine babyface ending.ending.
** Ironically, the man who unified the WCW and WWF titles was Wrestling/ChrisJericho, the first major WCW acquisition by Vince [=McMahon=]. He defeated both [[Wrestling/DwayneJohnson The Rock]] and Wrestling/StoneColdSteveAustin in the same night - in '''back-to-back matches''', no less! - to unify the two titles.


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* GimmickMatch: In the promotion's early years as WCW, it was horribly mismanaged and written by people who had no idea what wrestling fans wanted to see, relying on stunts and gimmicks to capture the glamour and flash of the WWF: such "matches" included a live appearance by Franchise/RoboCop [!] at a pay-per-view event, and the infamous [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Black_Scorpion_(professional_wrestling) Black Scorpion]] mystery.
26th Jul '16 2:32:14 PM rmctagg09
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Added DiffLines:

* GreaterScopeParagon: Men such as Jim Herd, Wrestling/EricBischoff and Wrestling/VinceRusso served as the defacto leaders and movers of Wrestling/{{WCW}} but they all relied on and could be overruled by Ted Turner. Wrestling/ChrisJericho once tried to exploit this by going straight to Turner to get a shot at the Cruiserweight belt and Turner would have done it too, based on Jericho's sound logic. But Chris was [[{{wangst}} so whiny]] Turner decided to go with his subordinate's decision instead.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Wrestling.WCW