History Woolseyism / Literature

14th Jul '17 5:27:47 AM NhazUl
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** The Bulgarian tranlation has some of these despite avoiding to translate proper names. Examples are the Polyjuice Potion, the not-so-apt literal translation of which was changed to "Poly''face'' Potion", and the Whomping Willow (a single-letter change transformed the name "weeping willow" to "scary willow", a. k. a. "the willow that scares", which it does).
13th May '17 11:59:02 PM fierystage
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** The French translation of ''Goblet of Fire'' takes advantage of the [[HeyYou differing forms of second-person address]] in their language by changing Ron's question about Snape and Karkaroff being on a first-name basis to why they use ''tu'' with each other.
13th May '17 8:11:39 AM Derkhan
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** There were two main committees at the time of the Terror, the Committee of Public Safety actually being less important than the one headed by Robespierre, the Committee of Public Welfare.
30th Apr '17 4:57:15 PM TVRulezAgain
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* Similar to the biblical examples above, most Muslim scholars will say that this is the only way that the Literature/{{Quran}} can be translated, as there is too much meaning riding on the phrasing of the original Arabic as to render the text "untranslatable" in the traditional sense. The most popular English translation, Abdullah Yusuf Ali's, takes this approach.

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* Similar to the biblical examples above, most Muslim scholars will say that this is the only way that the Literature/{{Quran}} Literature/TheQuran can be translated, as there is too much meaning riding on the phrasing of the original Arabic as to render the text "untranslatable" in the traditional sense. The most popular English translation, Abdullah Yusuf Ali's, takes this approach.
2nd Apr '17 5:32:08 PM DustSnitch
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** Ironically, plenty of subtle meaning is actually lost in translating ''Literature/TheBible'' 's ancient languages according to overall meaning instead of word-for-word. A well-known example is {{Jesus}}'s face-off with the Pharisees in John 8, where they ask Jesus how He could possibly think He is older than Moses. The Worldwide English (New Testament) translation of the response goes: ''Jesus answered, "I tell you the truth. I already was before Abraham was born."'', which while accurate in conveying the blunt meaning, misses out on the (intentional) back-reference of other translations. For example, the New International Version translation: ''"I tell you the truth," Jesus answered, "before Abraham was born, '''I am'''."'' This is a reference to the name of {{God}} (''God said to Moses, "'''I am''' who am."'' - Exodus 3:14), and thus signified that Jesus considered Himself God... Which explains why the Pharisees immediately flew into a rage and tried to stone Jesus (for blasphemy) when they had earlier just put up with being called the children of the devil with far less outrage.

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** Ironically, plenty of subtle meaning is actually lost in translating ''Literature/TheBible'' 's ancient languages according to overall meaning instead of word-for-word. A well-known example is {{Jesus}}'s UsefulNotes/{{Jesus}}'s face-off with the Pharisees in John 8, where they ask Jesus how He could possibly think He is older than Moses. The Worldwide English (New Testament) translation of the response goes: ''Jesus answered, "I tell you the truth. I already was before Abraham was born."'', which while accurate in conveying the blunt meaning, misses out on the (intentional) back-reference of other translations. For example, the New International Version translation: ''"I tell you the truth," Jesus answered, "before Abraham was born, '''I am'''."'' This is a reference to the name of {{God}} (''God said to Moses, "'''I am''' who am."'' - Exodus 3:14), and thus signified that Jesus considered Himself God... Which explains why the Pharisees immediately flew into a rage and tried to stone Jesus (for blasphemy) when they had earlier just put up with being called the children of the devil with far less outrage.
11th Mar '17 8:24:56 AM AutumnLeaves
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* There is no "th" sound in Russian, so the Russian translation turns Slytherin into Slizerin. "Sliz'" means "slime".

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* ** There is no "th" sound in Russian, so the Russian translation turns Slytherin into Slizerin. "Sliz'" means "slime".
11th Mar '17 8:24:44 AM AutumnLeaves
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** The Swedish translation of the goblins is also quite genius. Their Swedish name Svartalfer (black elves) does not only reference their relatedness with the house elves ("husalfer" in Swedish), but is also the name of a mythological creature from norse mythology. The mythological creature just so happens to live underground, be shorter than the average human, and have a habit of smithing various items imbedded with magic.

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** The Swedish translation of the goblins is also quite genius. Their Swedish name Svartalfer (black elves) does not only reference their relatedness with the house elves ("husalfer" in Swedish), but is also the name of a mythological creature from norse Norse mythology. The mythological creature just so happens to live underground, be shorter than the average human, and have a habit of smithing various items imbedded with magic.
* There is no "th" sound in Russian, so the Russian translation turns Slytherin into Slizerin. "Sliz'" means "slime".
1st Mar '17 4:29:24 AM ImpudentInfidel
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** Another English example caused by language drift: ''dikaiosuné'' is translated in the KJV and many later versions as "righteousness", but is usually translated into modern English as "justice". In the 16th century the two words meant the same thing; in modern English they have diverged significantly, with "righteous" meaning something more like "smug" in common usage.
21st Jan '17 1:26:40 PM karstovich2
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** While on the subject of Tolkien, his own translation of ''Literature/SirGawainAndTheGreenKnight'' is '''masterful'''. Granted he was "only" translating from (Old) English to (Modern) English, but he did it while also changing from the old convention of 'rhyme' (the beginnings of words should sound the same) to the new convention (the '''ends''' of words should sound the same). And he usually managed to keep the alliteration too, meaning his version rhymes by both the original author's standards and our modern day ones.

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** While on the subject of Tolkien, his own translation of ''Literature/SirGawainAndTheGreenKnight'' is '''masterful'''. Granted he was "only" translating from (Old) (14th-century Middle) English to (Modern) English (Middle English from that period is quite different from Modern English, but a speaker of Modern English can usually painstakingly puzzle out the meaning of a passage with the help of a dictionary), but he did it while also changing from the old convention of 'rhyme' (the beginnings of words should sound the same) to the new convention (the '''ends''' of words should sound the same). And he usually managed to keep the alliteration too, meaning his version rhymes by both the original author's standards and our modern day ones.
9th Aug '16 11:07:31 PM PaulA
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* Played with in the Khaavren novels of {{Dragaera}}, when the author makes up an equivalent Woolseyism ''in Dragaeran'' for a common English saying. Specifically, the local saying that "when you make assumptions, you are thinking like a fish" is allegedly derived from how the native language's words for "fish" and "think", when combined, sound much like their word for "assumption". The RealLife English equivalent is "when you assume, you make an ass out of you and me".

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* Played with in the Khaavren novels of {{Dragaera}}, ''Literature/KhaavrenRomances'', when the author makes up an equivalent Woolseyism ''in Dragaeran'' for a common English saying. Specifically, the local saying that "when you make assumptions, you are thinking like a fish" is allegedly derived from how the native language's words for "fish" and "think", when combined, sound much like their word for "assumption". The RealLife English equivalent is "when you assume, you make an ass out of you and me".
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