History Woolseyism / ComicBooks

27th Jul '16 2:55:35 AM Tuomas
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** The early English translations of Tintin also [[CulturalTranslation localized]] the various place names and other regional references to make it look like the stories were taking place in the UK instead of Belgium. This lead to some confusion among readers when they got to ''[[Recap/TintinTheBlackIsland The Black Island]]'', where the plot has Tintin traveling from Belgium to Britain.
25th Jul '16 3:51:59 PM nombretomado
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** One scene in ''Caesar's Gift'' involves Asterix sword-fighting a Roman while in character as {{Cyrano de Bergerac}}, quoting a lot of his most famous lines in a gag that goes for almost half a page (referencing Cyrano's famous duelling). While Cyrano de Bergerac is fairly well known in the UK, it's not known to a line-by-line level, and so the translator changed it to a reference to what she considered the most famous sword fight in English literature, Theatre/{{Hamlet}} vs. Laertes. This works especially well, since the Roman enemy gets to mishear another character saying 'disdain' and remark that he's 'more like an antique Roman than a Dane' (one of Laertes' lines, which is literally true here).

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** One scene in ''Caesar's Gift'' involves Asterix sword-fighting a Roman while in character as {{Cyrano de Bergerac}}, Theatre/CyranoDeBergerac, quoting a lot of his most famous lines in a gag that goes for almost half a page (referencing Cyrano's famous duelling). While Cyrano de Bergerac is fairly well known in the UK, it's not known to a line-by-line level, and so the translator changed it to a reference to what she considered the most famous sword fight in English literature, Theatre/{{Hamlet}} vs. Laertes. This works especially well, since the Roman enemy gets to mishear another character saying 'disdain' and remark that he's 'more like an antique Roman than a Dane' (one of Laertes' lines, which is literally true here).
6th Jun '16 4:13:51 AM Doug86
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** Sometimes the translators even one-up the originals: in Finland, the Asterix book ''Asterix and the Normans'' was translated as 'Asterix and the Landing of the Normans'', an obvious, but still very functional pun on the [[WorldWarII landing of Normandy]].

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** Sometimes the translators even one-up the originals: in Finland, the Asterix book ''Asterix and the Normans'' was translated as 'Asterix and the Landing of the Normans'', an obvious, but still very functional pun on the [[WorldWarII [[UsefulNotes/WorldWarII landing of Normandy]].
28th May '16 10:13:46 AM PhantomDusclops92
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* The first issue of ''ComicBook/TheUnbeatableSquirrelGirl'' begins with the titular heroine doing her own theme song on the notes of the classic ''[[WesternAnimation/SpiderMan1967 Spider-Man]]'' theme song. In the Italian translation, she does it on the notes of [[https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yTYkOzzYaDU the Italian theme song]] of the 1981 ''Spider-Man'' cartoon.
5th Apr '16 5:51:51 PM Jhonny
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* Asterix has been translated into several German dialects and in many of those, region appropriate lines have been inserted. Your mileage may vary though, whether you think it appropriate that Gallic villagers suddenly refer to the victory of a soccer team after their chief wins a fistfight.
11th Mar '16 6:27:41 AM StFan
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* ThePhantom is also known as "the ghost who walks." The Swedish translator could have chosen to call him "det gående spöket," which means exactly the same thing, but instead went for "den vandrande vålnaden," "the wandering wraith." No Swedish reader has ever complained about this.

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* ThePhantom ComicStrip/ThePhantom is also known as "the ghost who walks." The Swedish translator could have chosen to call him "det gående spöket," which means exactly the same thing, but instead went for "den vandrande vålnaden," "the wandering wraith." No Swedish reader has ever complained about this.
16th Feb '16 3:09:35 PM Omeganian
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** In Hebrew it's "Dani Shovevani", keeping the rhyme (can be translated as "Daniel the Mischievous").
18th Jan '16 10:59:11 AM sotnosen95
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* The distributors of ''ComicStrip/DennisTheMenaceUS'' for Latin America changed the name to Daniel el Travieso (Daniel the Naughty) because "menace" sounded bad and changed Dennis to Daniel because Daniel was (at the time) more common in Spanish, even when both names are unrelated (Daniel in English is Daniel, only the pronunciation changes). This change was also use for the animated TV show and the movies.

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* The distributors of ''ComicStrip/DennisTheMenaceUS'' for Latin America changed the name to Daniel el Travieso (Daniel the Naughty) because "menace" sounded bad and bad. They also changed Dennis to Daniel because Daniel was (at the time) more common in Spanish, even when though both names are unrelated (Daniel in English is Daniel, Daniel; only the pronunciation changes). This change was also use used for the animated TV show and the movies.
17th Jan '16 2:42:11 PM StFan
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* The distributors of DennisTheMenace for Latin America changed the name to Daniel el Travieso (Daniel the Naughty) because “menace” sounded bad and changed Dennis to Daniel because Daniel was (at the time) more common in Spanish, even when both names are unrelated (Daniel in English is Daniel, only the pronunciation changes). This change was also use for the animated TV show and the movies.

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* The distributors of DennisTheMenace ''ComicStrip/DennisTheMenaceUS'' for Latin America changed the name to Daniel el Travieso (Daniel the Naughty) because “menace” "menace" sounded bad and changed Dennis to Daniel because Daniel was (at the time) more common in Spanish, even when both names are unrelated (Daniel in English is Daniel, only the pronunciation changes). This change was also use for the animated TV show and the movies.
16th Jan '16 11:11:21 PM Luppercus
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* Something very common with comic strips: in Spanish Hägar the Horrible is known as Olafo el Vikingo and/or Olafo el Amargado (Olafo the Viking/Olafo the Embittered) and Blondie is known as Pepita, Dagwood Bumstead as Lorenzo Parachoques, Alexander as Goyito, Cookie as Cuquita, Herb Woodley as Heriberto Campos, Tootsie as Hortensia and Mr Julius Dithers as Julio González or Julio Dolariza.

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* Something very common with comic strips: in Spanish Hägar the Horrible ''HagarTheHorrible'' is known as Olafo el Vikingo and/or Olafo el Amargado (Olafo the Viking/Olafo the Embittered) and Blondie ''ComicBook/{{Blondie}}'' is known as Pepita, Dagwood Bumstead as Lorenzo Parachoques, Alexander as Goyito, Cookie as Cuquita, Herb Woodley as Heriberto Campos, Tootsie as Hortensia and Mr Julius Dithers as Julio González or Julio Dolariza.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=Woolseyism.ComicBooks