History Woolseyism / ComicBooks

18th Jan '16 10:59:11 AM sotnosen95
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* The distributors of ''ComicStrip/DennisTheMenaceUS'' for Latin America changed the name to Daniel el Travieso (Daniel the Naughty) because "menace" sounded bad and changed Dennis to Daniel because Daniel was (at the time) more common in Spanish, even when both names are unrelated (Daniel in English is Daniel, only the pronunciation changes). This change was also use for the animated TV show and the movies.
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* The distributors of ''ComicStrip/DennisTheMenaceUS'' for Latin America changed the name to Daniel el Travieso (Daniel the Naughty) because "menace" sounded bad and bad. They also changed Dennis to Daniel because Daniel was (at the time) more common in Spanish, even when though both names are unrelated (Daniel in English is Daniel, Daniel; only the pronunciation changes). This change was also use used for the animated TV show and the movies.
17th Jan '16 2:42:11 PM StFan
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* The distributors of DennisTheMenace for Latin America changed the name to Daniel el Travieso (Daniel the Naughty) because “menace” sounded bad and changed Dennis to Daniel because Daniel was (at the time) more common in Spanish, even when both names are unrelated (Daniel in English is Daniel, only the pronunciation changes). This change was also use for the animated TV show and the movies.
to:
* The distributors of DennisTheMenace ''ComicStrip/DennisTheMenaceUS'' for Latin America changed the name to Daniel el Travieso (Daniel the Naughty) because “menace” "menace" sounded bad and changed Dennis to Daniel because Daniel was (at the time) more common in Spanish, even when both names are unrelated (Daniel in English is Daniel, only the pronunciation changes). This change was also use for the animated TV show and the movies.
16th Jan '16 11:11:21 PM Luppercus
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* Something very common with comic strips: in Spanish Hägar the Horrible is known as Olafo el Vikingo and/or Olafo el Amargado (Olafo the Viking/Olafo the Embittered) and Blondie is known as Pepita, Dagwood Bumstead as Lorenzo Parachoques, Alexander as Goyito, Cookie as Cuquita, Herb Woodley as Heriberto Campos, Tootsie as Hortensia and Mr Julius Dithers as Julio González or Julio Dolariza.
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* Something very common with comic strips: in Spanish Hägar the Horrible ''HagarTheHorrible'' is known as Olafo el Vikingo and/or Olafo el Amargado (Olafo the Viking/Olafo the Embittered) and Blondie ''ComicBook/{{Blondie}}'' is known as Pepita, Dagwood Bumstead as Lorenzo Parachoques, Alexander as Goyito, Cookie as Cuquita, Herb Woodley as Heriberto Campos, Tootsie as Hortensia and Mr Julius Dithers as Julio González or Julio Dolariza.
16th Jan '16 11:08:31 PM Luppercus
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to:
* Something very common with comic strips: in Spanish Hägar the Horrible is known as Olafo el Vikingo and/or Olafo el Amargado (Olafo the Viking/Olafo the Embittered) and Blondie is known as Pepita, Dagwood Bumstead as Lorenzo Parachoques, Alexander as Goyito, Cookie as Cuquita, Herb Woodley as Heriberto Campos, Tootsie as Hortensia and Mr Julius Dithers as Julio González or Julio Dolariza.
16th Jan '16 10:49:36 PM Luppercus
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Added DiffLines:
* During TheFifties the Mexican Editorial Novarro had the rights for the translation and distribution of the DC Comics in Mexico, so they change many of the Anglo-Saxon names into Latino versions of the name thus Bruce Wayne became Bruno Diaz, Dick Grayson became Ricardo Tapia, Commissioner Gordon became Comisionado Fierro, Catwoman became Gatúbela, The Joker became El Comodín/El Guasón and Gotham City became Ciudad Gótica. They also had problems translating the name of the Bat-artifacts as the word Bat (Murciélago in Spanish) is never translated for obvious reasons, so they had to add an “I” to make the names suitable for Spanish pronunciation as for example: Batmobile became Batimóvil, Batcave became Baticueva, and Batgirl became Batichica. * The distributors of DennisTheMenace for Latin America changed the name to Daniel el Travieso (Daniel the Naughty) because “menace” sounded bad and changed Dennis to Daniel because Daniel was (at the time) more common in Spanish, even when both names are unrelated (Daniel in English is Daniel, only the pronunciation changes). This change was also use for the animated TV show and the movies.
17th Sep '15 2:05:27 PM StFan
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* DisneyComics in Poland, in general, tend to be truly well-translated, with lots of puns and {{Shout Out}}s added in to the point of being ReferenceOverdosed.
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* DisneyComics ComicBook/DisneyMouseAndDuckComics: ** Disney Comics in Poland, in general, tend to be truly well-translated, with lots of puns and {{Shout Out}}s added in to the point of being ReferenceOverdosed.

** In the 1950s, the Swedish publisher used one specific translator team for all DonaldDuck stories, and the members coined a lot of funny neologisms that gradually have become an accepted part of the vernacular.
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** In the 1950s, the Swedish publisher used one specific translator team for all DonaldDuck WesternAnimation/DonaldDuck stories, and the members coined a lot of funny neologisms that gradually have become an accepted part of the vernacular.
26th Aug '15 10:14:55 AM nombretomado
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** In ''Asterix and the Big Fight'', the original name of the [[LesCollaborateurs pro-roman]] Gaulish chief is Aplusbégalix ("A + B = X" read aloud in French). The English translation changes it to Cassius Ceramix. Not only is this a pun on MuhammadAli's former name Cassius Clay (appropriate since the titular fight is essentially a boxing match) but having a name ending in -us and another ending in -ix perfectly fits his nature as a collaborator.
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** In ''Asterix and the Big Fight'', the original name of the [[LesCollaborateurs pro-roman]] Gaulish chief is Aplusbégalix ("A + B = X" read aloud in French). The English translation changes it to Cassius Ceramix. Not only is this a pun on MuhammadAli's UsefulNotes/MuhammadAli's former name Cassius Clay (appropriate since the titular fight is essentially a boxing match) but having a name ending in -us and another ending in -ix perfectly fits his nature as a collaborator.
8th May '15 4:43:52 AM DeepRed
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** Sometimes the translators even one-up the originals: in Finland, the Asterix book ''Asterix and the Normans'' was translated as 'Asterix and the Landing of the Normans'', an obvious, but still very functional pun on the landing of Normandy.
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** Sometimes the translators even one-up the originals: in Finland, the Asterix book ''Asterix and the Normans'' was translated as 'Asterix and the Landing of the Normans'', an obvious, but still very functional pun on the [[WorldWarII landing of Normandy.Normandy]].
23rd Apr '15 5:03:16 PM Patachou
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Correction.
** Most of the other names were changed as well, and there are whole Web sites listing the names of the main cast in various languages. Even the title character's name is changed frequently, most notably to the rather bland-sounding "Tim" in German and the completely different "Kuifje" in Dutch, which means something like 'quiffy'. Also, in French his name is pronounced more like 'Tantan' than 'Tintin'. The dog's name is also prone to change, going from Milou in the French to, for example, Snowy in English, Bobbie in Dutch, and Struppi in German. Finally, Professeur Tournesol became Professor Calculus because "Professor Sunflower", the literal translation of his name, would have sounded a bit silly in English (not so in other languages, though, and he's called Zonnenbloem in Dutch, for example). *** The professor's first name, Tryphon, is an antiquated, somewhat stuffy-sounding first name that alliterates with his family name, Tournesol. This effect has been recreated in a number of translations, such as in the English Cuthbert Calculus, Finnish Teofilus Tuhatkauno and German Balduin Bienlein. In Dutch/Flemish it is Trifonius Zonnenbloem, however.
to:
** Most of the other names were changed as well, and there are whole Web sites listing the names of the main cast in various languages. Even the title character's name is changed frequently, most notably to the rather bland-sounding "Tim" in German and the completely different "Kuifje" in Dutch, which means something like 'quiffy'. Also, in French his name is pronounced more like 'Tantan' than 'Tintin'. The dog's name is also prone to change, going from Milou in the French to, for example, Snowy in English, Bobbie in Dutch, and Struppi in German. Finally, Professeur Tournesol became Professor Calculus because "Professor Sunflower", the literal translation of his name, would have sounded a bit silly in English (not so in other languages, though, and he's called Zonnenbloem Zonnebloem in Dutch, for example). *** The professor's first name, Tryphon, is an antiquated, somewhat stuffy-sounding first name that alliterates with his family name, Tournesol. This effect has been recreated in a number of translations, such as in the English Cuthbert Calculus, Finnish Teofilus Tuhatkauno and German Balduin Bienlein. In Dutch/Flemish it is Trifonius Zonnenbloem, Zonnebloem, however.
13th Jan '15 1:11:09 PM j21
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sp
** The original Danish translation of Tintin by Jørgen Sonnergaard is generally considered to be of very high quality. One of Sonnergaard's changes from the original was to have Captain Haddock swear in aliterations ("Pirate! Plebeian! Polecat! Prussian!") - something that Hergé himself adopted in the later albums. Sonnergaard also invented the name "Max Bjævermose" for the annoying insurance agent Seraphim Lampion (Joylon Wagg in English) and it fitted so well that when a new translation was announced in 2005 and fans discovered that Bjævermose was to be renamed, a "People's Movement For Max Bjævermose" was formed and the publishers were forced to pony up the extra cash so they could still use the name "Max Bjævermose" in the new translation.
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** The original Danish translation of Tintin by Jørgen Sonnergaard is generally considered to be of very high quality. One of Sonnergaard's changes from the original was to have Captain Haddock swear in aliterations ("Pirate! Plebeian! Polecat! Prussian!") - something that Hergé himself adopted in the later albums. Sonnergaard also invented the name "Max Bjævermose" for the annoying insurance agent Seraphim Lampion (Joylon (Jolyon Wagg in English) and it fitted so well that when a new translation was announced in 2005 and fans discovered that Bjævermose was to be renamed, a "People's Movement For Max Bjævermose" was formed and the publishers were forced to pony up the extra cash so they could still use the name "Max Bjævermose" in the new translation.
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