History WhatMeasureIsANonHuman / LiveActionTV

21st Jul '16 1:31:57 PM flootzavut
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** When Willow goes dark and on a RoaringRampageOfRevenge against Warren after he shoots Buffy and Tara, killing the former, Buffy is literally the ''only'' one of the Scoobies who wants Warren to face human justice for his crimes, while Xander and Dawn are so disgusted and pissed that they openly support Willow's intent to kill; after she succeeds, even Buffy reluctantly admits that Warren ''may'' have deserved to die. Nonetheless, the Scoobies all rally to defend Warren's ex-cohorts, who Willow is [[MisplacedRetribution now targeting]], because they had done nothing to deserve death.

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** When Willow goes dark and on a RoaringRampageOfRevenge against Warren after he shoots Buffy and Tara, killing the former, latter, Buffy is literally the ''only'' one of the Scoobies who wants Warren to face human justice for his crimes, while Xander and Dawn are so disgusted and pissed that they openly support Willow's intent to kill; after she succeeds, even Buffy reluctantly admits that Warren ''may'' have deserved to die. Nonetheless, the Scoobies all rally to defend Warren's ex-cohorts, who Willow is [[MisplacedRetribution now targeting]], because they had done nothing to deserve death.
3rd Dec '15 3:56:39 PM DarkHunter
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** This is even inverted at one point: an Unas named Chakka captures Daniel on a hunt as part of a rite of passage in his tribe, but by the end is arguing with his people that Daniel is an intelligent being, not an animal, and thus should not be ritually killed.
3rd Dec '15 3:53:58 PM DarkHunter
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** This issue is also addressed with the Unas in a number of episodes. Their body language unfortunately comes across to humans as somewhat aggressive, so they can seem quite menacing, but Daniel learns how to communicate with them a bit and finds that most Unas are really just peaceful people who are, at worst, rather suspicious of outsides to their tribes. He gets rather peeved when other people treat them like animals.

to:

** This issue is also addressed with the Unas in a number of episodes. Their body language unfortunately comes across to humans as somewhat aggressive, so they can seem quite menacing, but Daniel learns how to communicate with them a bit and finds that most Unas are really just peaceful people who are, at worst, rather suspicious of outsides outsiders to their tribes. He gets rather peeved when other people treat them like animals.
3rd Dec '15 3:53:35 PM DarkHunter
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** This issue is also addressed with the Unas in a number of episodes. Their body language unfortunately comes across to humans as somewhat aggressive, so they can seem quite menacing, but Daniel learns how to communicate with them a bit and gets rather peeved when other people treat them like animals.

to:

** This issue is also addressed with the Unas in a number of episodes. Their body language unfortunately comes across to humans as somewhat aggressive, so they can seem quite menacing, but Daniel learns how to communicate with them a bit and finds that most Unas are really just peaceful people who are, at worst, rather suspicious of outsides to their tribes. He gets rather peeved when other people treat them like animals.
3rd Dec '15 3:52:16 PM DarkHunter
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** This issue is also addressed with the Unas in a number of episodes. They can seem quite menacing, but Daniel's learned how to communicate with them a bit and gets rather peeved when other people treat them like animals.

to:

** This issue is also addressed with the Unas in a number of episodes. They Their body language unfortunately comes across to humans as somewhat aggressive, so they can seem quite menacing, but Daniel's learned Daniel learns how to communicate with them a bit and gets rather peeved when other people treat them like animals.
12th Aug '15 11:44:43 AM FF32
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** ''UltramanCosmos'' tamed the ''monsters'', in the ultimate subversion. However, many were killed by [[TheBigBad Chaos]].

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** ''UltramanCosmos'' tamed the ''monsters'', in the ultimate subversion. However, many were killed by [[TheBigBad [[BigBad Chaos]].
30th Jun '15 9:57:29 AM nombretomado
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* The 2000s ''Series/{{Battlestar Galactica|Reimagined}}'' is practically built on toying with every permutation of this trope. At the beginning, humans automatically treat Cylons as machines and Cylons automatically treat humans as cattle. As the series goes on, dissenters emerge in both races. Made more confused by the fact that Cylons, despite being artificially born and having cybernetic neural properties, practically are biologically human, and several 'human' characters are [[{{TomatoInTheMirror}} Cylon sleeper agents.]]

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* The 2000s ''Series/{{Battlestar Galactica|Reimagined}}'' Galactica|2003}}'' is practically built on toying with every permutation of this trope. At the beginning, humans automatically treat Cylons as machines and Cylons automatically treat humans as cattle. As the series goes on, dissenters emerge in both races. Made more confused by the fact that Cylons, despite being artificially born and having cybernetic neural properties, practically are biologically human, and several 'human' characters are [[{{TomatoInTheMirror}} Cylon sleeper agents.]]
6th May '15 4:45:42 PM Daedalis
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* ''Series/OtherSpace'' has several cases.
** Kent's physiology and upbringing are so different from standard that it is questionable whether he's human. After brief deliberation the crew decides he counts.
** Karen agonizes over accidentally killing [[spoiler:Art the robot]] until she finds that there are several versions of him available for easy replacement. She promptly kills another one to vent her frustration.
** Natasha the computer program will have her memory wiped at mission's end to give her a fresh start with the new crew and to preserve the current crew's privacy. No one's especially happy about this.
7th Apr '15 1:00:24 PM Morgenthaler
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* Omnipresent in the "Buffyverse":

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* Omnipresent in the "Buffyverse":"Franchise/{{Buffyverse}}":



*** It's clearly implied that Buffy knows this attitude is wrong, yet does it anyway. One example is when Buffy starts talking to Spike about things she won't reveal to the Scoobies. On the surface this hints at a new closeness between them, but in "[[Recap/BuffyTheVampireSlayerS6E7OnceMoreWithFeeling Once More With Feeling]]" Spike says (well, [[MusicalEpisode sings actually]]) that it's only because he's a "dead man" and so her confessions don't have to count -- Buffy looks away guiltily. Later on when they start having sex, Buffy feels angst not only about the things Spike is encouraging her to do, but also over how she's using Spike purely for thrills without respecting the love he feels for her, or even acknowledging that it's genuine love at all.



*** There are other incidents in ''Buffy'' which suggest that, so far as Buffy is concerned, humans are outside her jurisdiction, end of story. The only time she killed humans intentionally was in "[[Recap/BuffyTheVampireSlayerS5E20Spiral Spiral]]", and the Knights of Byzantium didn't leave her with any other choice, as they were directly engaging her in armed conflict.
*** Actually, she also killed Caleb in the series finale.
**** Then again Caleb had already killed two potential slayers (Molly and Dianne), stabbed another one and gouged one of Xander's eyes. Mostly self defense



*** In fact, there's a scene in the season 3 episode ''[[Recap/AngelS03E17Forgiving Forgiving]]'' where Angel is threatening to torture a human and Lorne, who's a demon, tries to dissuade him, saying "Angel, that's not a slimey demon you've got there, that's a human". Apparently, even good demons value human life more than demon life.
**** Actually, Angel's group seems to believe this more than Angel - when he let Darla and Drusilla kill all those lawyers, he was doing exactly what he would have done if they were demons. He doesn't see it as a MoralEventHorizon, though the group do.
*** However, Angel had Lorne assassinate Lindsey, and two of members of the Circle of the Black Thorn assassinated by Illyria were also human, at least in appearance. Speaking of Circle of the Black Thorn, there was also that politician that Gunn killed.
*** The point is that Angel is perfectly capable of and willing to kill humans if he feels the need arises. Case in point: he takes out AxCrazy PsychoForHire Vanessa Brewer, who, thanks to Wolfram & Hart, constantly [[ScrewTheRulesIHaveConnections got off scot-free no matter what she did]].
* Oddly, ''{{Smallville}}'' lampshades it and tosses it aside in the 7th season finale. The sentient, apparently emotional robot Brainiac, at Clark's mercy, tells him he could never kill a man. Clark quickly replies [[JustAMachine "You're a machine,"]] then electrifies him.

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*** In fact, there's a scene in the season 3 episode ''[[Recap/AngelS03E17Forgiving Forgiving]]'' where Angel is threatening to torture a human and Lorne, who's a demon, tries to dissuade him, saying "Angel, that's not a slimey demon you've got there, that's a human". Apparently, even good demons value human life more than demon life.
**** Actually, Angel's group seems to believe this more than Angel - when he let Darla and Drusilla kill all those lawyers, he was doing exactly what he would have done if they were demons. He doesn't see it as a MoralEventHorizon, though the group do.
*** However, Angel had Lorne assassinate Lindsey, and two of members of the Circle of the Black Thorn assassinated by Illyria were also human, at least in appearance. Speaking of Circle of the Black Thorn, there was also that politician that Gunn killed.
*** The point is that Angel is perfectly capable of and willing to kill humans if he feels the need arises. Case in point: he takes out AxCrazy PsychoForHire Vanessa Brewer, who, thanks to Wolfram & Hart, constantly [[ScrewTheRulesIHaveConnections got off scot-free no matter what she did]].
* ''Series/{{Smallville}}'':
**
Oddly, ''{{Smallville}}'' the show lampshades it and tosses it aside in the 7th season finale. The sentient, apparently emotional robot Brainiac, at Clark's mercy, tells him he could never kill a man. Clark quickly replies [[JustAMachine "You're a machine,"]] then electrifies him.



** The Doctor also had a long running argument with the Brigadier about "the military mind's" tendency to solve everything with "five rounds rapid". Completely averted with [[Recap/DoctorWhoS7E2DoctorWhoAndTheSilurians "Doctor Who and the Silurians"]]; the Doctor is upset at the Brigadier destroying the Silurian base.

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** The Doctor also had a long running argument with the Brigadier about "the military mind's" tendency to solve everything with "five rounds rapid". Completely averted Averted with [[Recap/DoctorWhoS7E2DoctorWhoAndTheSilurians "Doctor Who and the Silurians"]]; the Doctor is upset at the Brigadier destroying the Silurian base.



*** If the space series is any indication, where Zordon sacrificed himself to 'purge evil,' it could be more along the lines of their technology or whatever only recognizing and not destroying 'near-human' enemies. Astronema's right hand Ecliptor was an especially poignant example as he waffled between sides over his honour, yet still got vaped by Zordon anyway. Becoming cyborg reduces human quotient enough for the weapon to automatically swap from Stun to Kill settings. How this actually works is just....just something you don't even want to try and figure out.
*** Just look at those scenes to see this trope. Rita and Zedd - turned good. Divatox - turned good. All the monsters and robots - dust. Including Prince Sprocket, who was technically a kid, and comic relief duo Goldar and Rito. [[FridgeLogic If you think about it]], shouldn't robots be easier than humans to reprogram as good?
*** And this can not be pointed out strongly enough: Rito was ''Rita's brother''. Unless Rita was originally a human(oid) adopted by Master Vile, ala Astronema.
*** Things of note: 1. We never do ''see'' what happened to Goldar and Rito, or Squatt, Baboo, Finster, or long-unseen Scorpina. 2. It has been speculated that Rita and Zedd being purged like that was a ''VillainsDyingGrace'' kind of thing, leaving them alive, memories intact, but now able to feel guilt over all the death and destruction they wrought. 3. Rita is implied to have been rotten from the beginning. 4. Divatox being spared was because of the fact she was supposed to be Dimitria's kidnapped sister. 5. With the exception of Ecliptor, the villains we see destroyed were ''much'' less popular than Rita and Zedd. Especially Elgar.



** Brutally {{Deconstructed}} with the Inves in ''Series/KamenRiderGaim''. At first, the heroes have absolutely no problem with using lethal force against the creatures, believing them to be mindless beasts. Then comes the WhamEpisode where [[spoiler: Hase/Kamen Rider Kurokage is transformed into an Inves, while Micchy learns that many of the creatures are actually mutated humans, and that the first Inves Kamen Rider Gaim ever killed was actually his best friend Yuya]]. After [[spoiler: Hase]] is brutally executed by Kamen Rider Sigurd, Kouta tearfully asks why the boy had to die, at which point Sigurd simply smiles and says that killing monsters is what Riders do.

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** Brutally {{Deconstructed}} with the Inves in ''Series/KamenRiderGaim''. At first, the heroes have absolutely no problem with using lethal force against the creatures, believing them to be mindless beasts. Then comes the WhamEpisode where [[spoiler: Hase/Kamen Rider Kurokage is transformed into an Inves, while Micchy learns that many of the creatures are actually mutated humans, and that the first Inves Kamen Rider Gaim ever killed was actually his best friend Yuya]]. After [[spoiler: Hase]] is brutally executed by Kamen Rider Sigurd, Kouta tearfully asks why the boy had to die, at which point Sigurd simply smiles and says that killing monsters is what Riders do.



* These issues some up multiple times with many different races in ''Series/StargateSG1'' and ''Series/StargateAtlantis'':
** In ''Atlantis'', the Atlantis Expedition has allowed itself to perform war-crime experiments on some captured Wraith, because "if they were there when the Third Geneva Convention was signed, they would have eaten the attendees instead". This comes back to bite them, in the form of [[ThenLetMeBeEvil Michael]].
** It gets worse. The ''Atlantis'' team has yet to extend sympathy to ''any'' non-human, including those [[spoiler:that used to be human, like Weir. They guilt her into killing herself and all the other friendly sapient Replicators with her]]. Their utter disregard for non-humans of any kind is reaching DesignatedHero levels here.
*** The replicators aren't dead, they're just out cold, and it was Weir who pushed for it.
** Some episodes show that the Wraith, or most of them, are not evil per se, but the laws of nature dictate that they feed on humans to survive. Those same laws dictate that humans do not calmly accept this, but instead kill Wraith to survive, ala dolphins killing sharks. It's all a matter of who wins, not good and evil, at least until the treatment to make Wraith not need to feed on humans is invented.
*** The Wraiths' unexplained specific requirement of ''human'' LifeEnergy instead of nonsapient animals brings this far into the FantasticAesop territory. The species is just written to provoke this conflict.
*** It is briefly covered that the Wraith evolved because the Iratus bug fed on humans.
*** The Wraiths use this logic in regards to humans, making it clear that people are just food. They aren't out right cruel (compared to the Goa'uld). While they do have the runners and the like that is as much about finding food and enjoying the hunt. It is possible to argue that the humans to more torturing of Wraiths than vice versa, at least if you don't include the Wraiths feeding off of humans.
*** It turns out that the treatment isn't perfect, it tends to break Wraith technology.
** The ''Atlantis'' team helped a non-human civilization's probe rebuild said civilization recently. It was kind of surprising that Sheppard was so amenable, given that [[spoiler: the probe mentally tortured him]].

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* These issues some up multiple times with many different races in ''Series/StargateSG1'' and ''Series/StargateAtlantis'':
** In ''Atlantis'', the The Atlantis Expedition has allowed itself to perform war-crime experiments on some captured Wraith, because "if they were there when the Third Geneva Convention was signed, they would have eaten the attendees instead". This comes back to bite them, in the form of [[ThenLetMeBeEvil Michael]].
** It gets worse. The ''Atlantis'' team has yet to extend sympathy to ''any'' non-human, including those [[spoiler:that used to be human, like Weir. They guilt her into killing herself and all the other friendly sapient Replicators with her]]. Their utter disregard for non-humans of any kind is reaching DesignatedHero levels here.
*** The replicators aren't dead, they're just out cold, and it was Weir who pushed for it.
** Some episodes show that the Wraith, or most of them, are not evil per se, but the laws of nature dictate that they feed on humans to survive. Those same laws dictate that humans do not calmly accept this, but instead kill Wraith to survive, ala dolphins killing sharks. It's all a matter of who wins, not good and evil, at least until the treatment to make Wraith not need to feed on humans is invented.
***
invented. The Wraiths' unexplained specific requirement of ''human'' human LifeEnergy instead of nonsapient animals brings this far into the FantasticAesop territory. The species is just written to provoke this conflict.
*** It is briefly covered that the Wraith evolved because the Iratus bug fed on humans.
*** The Wraiths use this logic in regards to humans, making it clear that people are just food. They aren't out right cruel (compared to the Goa'uld). While they do have the runners and the like that is as much about finding food and enjoying the hunt. It is possible to argue that the humans to more torturing of Wraiths than vice versa, at least if you don't include the Wraiths feeding off of humans.
*** It turns out that the treatment isn't perfect, it tends to break Wraith technology.
** The ''Atlantis'' team helped a non-human civilization's probe rebuild said civilization recently. It was kind of surprising that Sheppard was so amenable, given that [[spoiler: the probe mentally tortured him]].
conflict.



** In ''Series/StargateSG1'', O'Neill got the whole freakin' ''galaxy'' in trouble by applying this trope on Humanoid Replicator "Fifth". If he'd just brought him with them when they escaped, he wouldn't have created [=RepliCarter=], who would kill Fifth and attempt to wipe out the galaxy.
*** From O'Neill's perspective, Fifth's FaceHeelTurn just proves he was right not to trust him all along. But then. Jack's morality is a bit more black-and-white than the target audience's.
*** Jack still has more shades of grey though than ''any'' of Atlantis' cast.

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** In ''Series/StargateSG1'', O'Neill got the whole freakin' ''galaxy'' in trouble by applying this trope on Humanoid Replicator "Fifth". If he'd just brought him with them when they escaped, he wouldn't have created [=RepliCarter=], who would kill Fifth and attempt to wipe out the galaxy.
*** From O'Neill's perspective, Fifth's FaceHeelTurn just proves he was right not to trust him all along. But then. Jack's morality is a bit more black-and-white than the target audience's.
*** Jack still has more shades of grey though than ''any'' of Atlantis' cast.
* ''Series/StargateSG1'':



*** [[AffablyEvil Ba'al]]. And [[DepartmentOfRedundancyDepartment Ba'al]]. And [[RuleOfThree Ba'al]]. And [[MesACrowd Ba'al]]... He's [[ComedicSociopathy killed to the point of making it]] a RunningGag. Sometimes twice in the same episode. Gotta love clone Goa'ulds. [[spoiler:He is also the final remaining villain in the main SG-1 series, nearly conquering humanity in ''[[Film/StargateContinuum Continuum]]''.]]
** This issue is also addressed with the Unas in a number of ''[[Series/StargateSG1 SG-1]]'' episodes. They can seem quite menacing, but Daniel's learned how to communicate with them a bit and gets rather peeved when other people treat them like animals.
** Also, in the ''[[Series/StargateSG1 SG-1]]'' season-three episode "Urgo", the team encounters a program which was downloaded into their brains, and unintentionally results in an AI named Urgo. Who constantly pesters them. They go to Urgo's creator to have him removed, but Urgo is afraid that he will be destroyed. Sam and Daniel decide that destroying him would be akin to murder, because he is intelligent, aware of his existence, and afraid of death, and these together define him as sentient. They convince the rest of SG-1 and Urgo's creator to agree with them, so Urgo's creator downloads the AI into his own brain instead of destroying him.
** And [[RunningGag Ba'al]].
** ''SG-1's'' first season had it happen twice with HumanAliens: once with Teal'c in "The Enemy Within", and once with the Tollans in "Enigma". In both cases it contrasted the SGC, which believed that offworld-born humans and human offshoots should be afforded the same rights as Earthlings, and the NID, which didn't. "Enigma" features this gem:

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*** [[AffablyEvil Ba'al]]. And [[DepartmentOfRedundancyDepartment Ba'al]]. And [[RuleOfThree Ba'al]]. And [[MesACrowd Ba'al]]... He's [[ComedicSociopathy killed to the point of making it]] a RunningGag. Sometimes twice in the same episode. Gotta love clone Goa'ulds. [[spoiler:He is also the final remaining villain in the main SG-1 series, nearly conquering humanity in ''[[Film/StargateContinuum Continuum]]''.]]
** This issue is also addressed with the Unas in a number of ''[[Series/StargateSG1 SG-1]]'' episodes. They can seem quite menacing, but Daniel's learned how to communicate with them a bit and gets rather peeved when other people treat them like animals.
** Also, in In the ''[[Series/StargateSG1 SG-1]]'' season-three episode "Urgo", the team encounters a program which was downloaded into their brains, and unintentionally results in an AI named Urgo. Who constantly pesters them. They go to Urgo's creator to have him removed, but Urgo is afraid that he will be destroyed. Sam and Daniel decide that destroying him would be akin to murder, because he is intelligent, aware of his existence, and afraid of death, and these together define him as sentient. They convince the rest of SG-1 and Urgo's creator to agree with them, so Urgo's creator downloads the AI into his own brain instead of destroying him.
** And [[RunningGag Ba'al]].
** ''SG-1's''
The first season had it happen twice with HumanAliens: once with Teal'c in "The Enemy Within", and once with the Tollans in "Enigma". In both cases it contrasted the SGC, which believed that offworld-born humans and human offshoots should be afforded the same rights as Earthlings, and the NID, which didn't. "Enigma" features this gem:



*** Teal'c got the shaft from the NID again in "Bane".



* ''Series/{{Farscape}}'' subverts the "duplicates are worthless" concept, ''hard'', with a villain who has a machine that can create instant, perfect duplicates - such that the question of "which is the original" is, for all intents and purposes, meaningless. When Chiana is duplicated and one of them is killed, she tries very, very hard to convince herself that she's okay because it was just a clone and she's definitely the original... but she chokes up when she gives this speech. Both Johns are treated as equal, [[spoiler:and when one of them dies, Aeryn can't even look the other in the face for a while]]. Also, the ExpendableAlternateUniverse treatment of identical opposites is thoroughly deconstructed (see that page). As for the show's and the characters' treatment of humans versus non-humans, well, the characters are various degrees of amoral and the creators love painful deaths, so it's hard to say.

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* ''Series/{{Farscape}}'' ''Series/{{Farscape}}'':
** It
subverts the "duplicates are worthless" concept, ''hard'', with a villain who has a machine that can create instant, perfect duplicates - such that the question of "which is the original" is, for all intents and purposes, meaningless. When Chiana is duplicated and one of them is killed, she tries very, very hard to convince herself that she's okay because it was just a clone and she's definitely the original... but she chokes up when she gives this speech. Both Johns are treated as equal, [[spoiler:and when one of them dies, Aeryn can't even look the other in the face for a while]]. Also, the ExpendableAlternateUniverse treatment of identical opposites is thoroughly deconstructed (see that page). As for the show's and the characters' treatment of humans versus non-humans, well, the characters are various degrees of amoral and the creators love painful deaths, so it's hard to say.



* The Winchesters of ''Series/{{Supernatural}}'' and their allies seem to care less and less about killing or torturing demons as the show goes on, despite demons possessing human bodies with the original occupant still in there. To be fair, they are in a very bad situation where mercy isn't always an option, they're facing hordes of demons and little time later on, and it's stated and shown that many demons put their hosts through a lot of punishment, possibily killing them even if they are expelled. This is why the human version of [[WhatTheHellHero Meg calling Sam out on it]] was such an awesome moment.
** Actually, one of the reasons [[TheHeart Sam]] starts out using [[PsychoSerum demon blood]]-fueled powers is because it lets him exorcise demons quickly and without endangering the host. When Ruby tries to persuade Sam to work with her, Sam orders her to vacate her current host. To placate him, she goes to a hospital and possesses the empty body of a Jane Doe who just flatlined, which Sam reluctantly accepts. The Winchester Brothers care less about hosts when Sam isn't in any position to be a MoralityPet or isn't really being TheHeart. Or when the other is threatened.

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* ''Series/{{Supernatural}}'':
**
The Winchesters of ''Series/{{Supernatural}}'' and their allies seem to care less and less about killing or torturing demons as the show goes on, despite demons possessing human bodies with the original occupant still in there. To be fair, they are in a very bad situation where mercy isn't always an option, they're facing hordes of demons and little time later on, and it's stated and shown that many demons put their hosts through a lot of punishment, possibily killing them even if they are expelled. This is why the human version of [[WhatTheHellHero Meg calling Sam out on it]] was such an awesome moment.
** Actually, one of the reasons
moment. [[TheHeart Sam]] starts out using [[PsychoSerum demon blood]]-fueled powers is partly because it lets him exorcise demons quickly and without endangering the host. When Ruby tries to persuade Sam to work with her, Sam orders her to vacate her current host. To placate him, she goes to a hospital and possesses the empty body of a Jane Doe who just flatlined, which Sam reluctantly accepts. The Winchester Brothers care less about hosts when Sam isn't in any position to be a MoralityPet or isn't really being TheHeart. Or when the other is threatened.



*** It's likely but not certain that the general attitude of Hunters toward Sam as an "abomination" for having psychic powers (from demon blood) by itself would have led most of them to hunt and kill him as NotQuiteHuman, but most gun for him pretty hard once they know [[YouMonster he brought on]] [[TheEndOfTheWorldAsWeKnowIt the Apocalypse]].



* This is exploited in the ''MysteryScienceTheater3000'' episode ''Screaming Skull''. Before the main film, Mike and the 'bots watch the ''{{Gumby}}'' short "Robot Rumpus", in which a bunch of housework-performing (and apparently non-sapient) robots go rampant and start destroying property. Gumby and his dad forcibly dismantle the wayward robots, and this is all presented as comedy. Crow and Tom Servo, robots themselves, are thoroughly traumatized by the proceedings.
** On the other hand, Tom Servo has ''hundreds'' of duplicates of himself, and takes no issue with blowing them up at the end of the series.
** Taken to its (il)logical extreme when Cambot, their handy camera-wielding robot, starts crying at the end of ''Film/DangerDeathRay'' after the hero blows apart a series of the villain's... [[WhatDoYouMeanItsNotHeinous security cameras]].
* A question often posed in ''TheSarahConnorChronicles'', especially relating to Cameron. The characters have varying degrees of belief in the value of Terminators as a whole and Cameron in particular; Derek Reese views her as a dangerous, inhuman threat, Sarah views her as a useful machine but who lacks emotions or a soul, and John views her as a close confidant, protector, and friend who he'll go to any lengths to protect, just as she would for him.
** Interestingly, even Cameron herself angsts over this, paradoxically seeming to possess something like enough to a soul to be capable of being bothered by the idea of not having one.

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* ''Series/MysteryScienceTheater3000'':
**
This is exploited in the ''MysteryScienceTheater3000'' episode ''Screaming Skull''. Before the main film, Mike and the 'bots watch the ''{{Gumby}}'' ''WesternAnimation/{{Gumby}}'' short "Robot Rumpus", in which a bunch of housework-performing (and apparently non-sapient) robots go rampant and start destroying property. Gumby and his dad forcibly dismantle the wayward robots, and this is all presented as comedy. Crow and Tom Servo, robots themselves, are thoroughly traumatized by the proceedings.
** On the other hand, Tom Servo has ''hundreds'' of duplicates of himself, and takes no issue with blowing them up at the end of the series.
** Taken to its (il)logical extreme when Cambot, their handy camera-wielding robot, starts crying at the end of ''Film/DangerDeathRay'' after the hero blows apart a series of the villain's... [[WhatDoYouMeanItsNotHeinous security cameras]].
cameras.
* A question often posed in ''TheSarahConnorChronicles'', ''Series/TerminatorTheSarahConnorChronicles'', especially relating to Cameron. The characters have varying degrees of belief in the value of Terminators as a whole and Cameron in particular; Derek Reese views her as a dangerous, inhuman threat, Sarah views her as a useful machine but who lacks emotions or a soul, and John views her as a close confidant, protector, and friend who he'll go to any lengths to protect, just as she would for him.
** Interestingly, even Cameron herself angsts over this, paradoxically seeming to possess something like enough to a soul to be capable of being bothered by the idea of not having one.
him.



* Generally averted in ''{{Grimm}}''. Nick is fine with letting supernatural creatures live their lives, as long as they are not breaking the law and has treated them as he would to human beings in comparative situations. This comes to a shock to many Wesen as this approach was unheard of among Grimms. Many still remain wary of Nick while the ones that get to know Nick are surprised that Nick seems to ignore the traditional feuds, even appreciating the protection that comes with having a Grimm as an ally. With the reputation of Grimms, most creatures that recognize Nick instantly assume he is there to kill them on the spot.

to:

* ''Series/{{Grimm}}'':
**
Generally averted in ''{{Grimm}}''.averted. Nick is fine with letting supernatural creatures live their lives, as long as they are not breaking the law and has treated them as he would to human beings in comparative situations. This comes to a shock to many Wesen as this approach was unheard of among Grimms. Many still remain wary of Nick while the ones that get to know Nick are surprised that Nick seems to ignore the traditional feuds, even appreciating the protection that comes with having a Grimm as an ally. With the reputation of Grimms, most creatures that recognize Nick instantly assume he is there to kill them on the spot.



* The UltraSeries has several examples. While most monsters are forces of nature, many aliens have good reasons for the trouble they cause earth. Subverted overall, because the ultras are aliens.
** One ''[[Ultraman]]'' episode featured Jamila, a man transformed into a monster. One of the saddest episodes in the series.

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* The UltraSeries Franchise/UltraSeries has several examples. While most monsters are forces of nature, many aliens have good reasons for the trouble they cause earth. Subverted overall, because the ultras are aliens.
** One ''[[Ultraman]]'' ''Series/{{Ultraman}}'' episode featured Jamila, a man transformed into a monster. One of the saddest episodes in the series.



** Completely subverted in an episode where the sisters were hunting what they thought was a demon going after an innocent baby. Turned out the 'demon' [[MonsterIsAMommy was actually the baby's father]], who had learned magic and transformed himself [[IDidWhatIHadToDo so as to have the power to protect his son from his mother and her kind]]. (This baby would be the half-manticore child mentioned just above here.) Not only did the sisters give the fellow a chance to explain the truth (despite him being willing to kidnap and endanger them), they stopped the real demons, saved his life (after his brush with death [[ThisWasHisTrueForm restored him to his human self]]), and got his son back for him. All of this despite the Elders telling them that 'the baby was a (half) demon and [[AlwaysChaoticEvil can never be raised to be anything else]]', which they point out is untrue since as he's half-human, he has the capacity for ''good'' as well and his future is his to decide.

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** Completely subverted Subverted in an episode where the sisters were hunting what they thought was a demon going after an innocent baby. Turned out the 'demon' [[MonsterIsAMommy was actually the baby's father]], who had learned magic and transformed himself [[IDidWhatIHadToDo so as to have the power to protect his son from his mother and her kind]]. (This baby would be the half-manticore child mentioned just above here.) Not only did the sisters give the fellow a chance to explain the truth (despite him being willing to kidnap and endanger them), they stopped the real demons, saved his life (after his brush with death [[ThisWasHisTrueForm restored him to his human self]]), and got his son back for him. All of this despite the Elders telling them that 'the baby was a (half) demon and [[AlwaysChaoticEvil can never be raised to be anything else]]', which they point out is untrue since as he's half-human, he has the capacity for ''good'' as well and his future is his to decide.



* ''TheTomorrowPeople'' have a barrier in their mind that keeps them from (knowingly) killing. In the second story of the original series, a captive boy says that he could kill Jedikiah by sending him into magma because Jedikiah is a robot so it doesn't count as killing.
* ''{{Series/Extant}}'': John objects to one of the board member's questions as to whether he has a plan of how to destroy Humanichs in the event they revolted by saying [[RobotBoy Ethan]] is his son, and questioning whether she has a plan to kill her daughter. The woman counters by saying that her daughter has a soul, to which John says there's no appreciable difference between humans' and Humanichs' brains. It soon degenerates into insults.

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* ''TheTomorrowPeople'' ''Series/TheTomorrowPeople'' have a barrier in their mind that keeps them from (knowingly) killing. In the second story of the original series, a captive boy says that he could kill Jedikiah by sending him into magma because Jedikiah is a robot so it doesn't count as killing.
* ''{{Series/Extant}}'': ''Series/{{Extant}}'': John objects to one of the board member's questions as to whether he has a plan of how to destroy Humanichs in the event they revolted by saying [[RobotBoy Ethan]] is his son, and questioning whether she has a plan to kill her daughter. The woman counters by saying that her daughter has a soul, to which John says there's no appreciable difference between humans' and Humanichs' brains. It soon degenerates into insults.insults.
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5th Apr '15 1:11:57 PM ACW
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** Averted in [[Recap/DoctorWhoS33E2DinosaursOnASpaceship "Dinosaurs on a Spaceship"]]. The Doctor is angry when he finds out the human Solomon murdered the Silurians, and when missiles are sent at Solomon's ship he leaves him to die. This proved slightly controversial despite Solomon being an obvious CompleteMonster.

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** Averted in [[Recap/DoctorWhoS33E2DinosaursOnASpaceship "Dinosaurs on a Spaceship"]]. The Doctor is angry when he finds out the human Solomon murdered the Silurians, and when missiles are sent at Solomon's ship he leaves him to die. This proved slightly controversial despite Solomon being an obvious CompleteMonster.bad guy.
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http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=WhatMeasureIsANonHuman.LiveActionTV