History WhatMeasureIsANonHuman / ComicBooks

14th Apr '17 8:04:44 PM Blazer
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* Invoked in an issue of ''ComicBook/USAvengers'' where Colonel Maverick stops fighting Deadpool because he was speaking English. Deadpool appropriately lampshades this.
19th Mar '17 10:36:08 AM Sammettik
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** The same story also contains the phrase,

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** The same story also contains the phrase,phrase:



* Examined in ComicBook/ElfQuest. It's an unwritten rule that elves, especially the Wolfriders, Don't Kill Other Elves. When finally one elf has to choose between killing his enemy and losing his son, it's appropriately traumatic for the character when he decides to shoot. However, the Wolfriders consider themselves part of the forest, and as a result they hunt, kill, eat raw meat, return their dead to the earth, and never interfere when one of their wolves is cast out from the pack (which essentially means a lonely death). The Sunfolk, who live as oasis farmers, take it one step further and lived as vegetarians for close to 10000 years before a lack of rain forced them to take up hunting. One character who particularly fits the trope is the Wolfrider chief Mantricker, who enjoys hunting humans, but would never kill one. In an unfortunate case of a localisation entirely missing the point, his name in the Dutch version roughly translates to "Humankiller".

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* Examined in ComicBook/ElfQuest.''ComicBook/ElfQuest''. It's an unwritten rule that elves, especially the Wolfriders, Don't Kill Other Elves. When finally one elf has to choose between killing his enemy and losing his son, it's appropriately traumatic for the character when he decides to shoot. However, the Wolfriders consider themselves part of the forest, and as a result they hunt, kill, eat raw meat, return their dead to the earth, and never interfere when one of their wolves is cast out from the pack (which essentially means a lonely death). The Sunfolk, who live as oasis farmers, take it one step further and lived as vegetarians for close to 10000 years before a lack of rain forced them to take up hunting. One character who particularly fits the trope is the Wolfrider chief Mantricker, who enjoys hunting humans, but would never kill one. In an unfortunate case of a localisation entirely missing the point, his name in the Dutch version roughly translates to "Humankiller".



* Subverted in an issue of the ComicBook/{{Superfriends}} comics (70's version): the heroes rescue a beautiful woman from what appears to be a collection of movie monsters (including a werewolf and a mummy!) It turned out however, that she was actually a space criminal, and the monsters were- '''alien superheroes''' that ''just happened'' to look like our movie monsters!

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* Subverted in an issue of the ComicBook/{{Superfriends}} ''ComicBook/{{Superfriends}}'' comics (70's version): the heroes rescue a beautiful woman from what appears to be a collection of movie monsters (including a werewolf and a mummy!) It turned out however, that she was actually a space criminal, and the monsters were- '''alien superheroes''' that ''just happened'' to look like our movie monsters!



** This was subverted in the ComicBook/OperationGalacticStorm arc, however. ComicBook/CaptainAmerica and other Avengers were opposed to destroying the Kree Supreme Intelligence, a sentient super computer, because they considered it alive and thus its life was sacred. ComicBook/IronMan and other Avengers disagreed and destroyed it in order to save the galaxy.

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** This was subverted in the ComicBook/OperationGalacticStorm ''ComicBook/OperationGalacticStorm'' arc, however. ComicBook/CaptainAmerica and other Avengers were opposed to destroying the Kree Supreme Intelligence, a sentient super computer, because they considered it alive and thus its life was sacred. ComicBook/IronMan and other Avengers disagreed and destroyed it in order to save the galaxy.



* This trope leads to massive MoralDissonance in ComicBook/TeenTitans issue 100. Superboy-Prime attacks Titans Tower in an attempt to kill Superboy (Conner) and brings along a handful of Superboy clones grown from Conner's DNA. Conner brings out his emergency Kryptonite and two Titans without a [[ThouShaltNotKill no killing code]], Ravager and Robin, kill the clones by stabbing them through the heart with a Kryptonite spike. Once Prime is taken down (and bearing in mind he's the most powerful and evil of any of the villains present by a mile) the same two suggest finishing him off. They're told "that would be murder" and "we're not killers". But killing the clones was apparently okay. And just to make matters worse, ''Conner is himself a clone''. He even mentions that he started off as a "blank slate" like the other Superboy clones.

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* This trope leads to massive MoralDissonance in ComicBook/TeenTitans ''ComicBook/TeenTitans'' issue 100. Superboy-Prime attacks Titans Tower in an attempt to kill Superboy (Conner) and brings along a handful of Superboy clones grown from Conner's DNA. Conner brings out his emergency Kryptonite and two Titans without a [[ThouShaltNotKill no killing code]], Ravager and Robin, kill the clones by stabbing them through the heart with a Kryptonite spike. Once Prime is taken down (and bearing in mind he's the most powerful and evil of any of the villains present by a mile) the same two suggest finishing him off. They're told "that would be murder" and "we're not killers". But killing the clones was apparently okay. And just to make matters worse, ''Conner is himself a clone''. He even mentions that he started off as a "blank slate" like the other Superboy clones.



* Completely and utterly [[DefiedTrope defied]] in the ComicBook/{{Invincible}} spin-off ''Guarding the Globe.'' When [[spoiler:Japandroid sacrifices herself to stop a global parasite infection, her death is treated ''exactly'' the same as if she was human. No one even mentions that she was a robot.]]
* An interesting case is with Hulkling in ComicBook/YoungAvengers. He isn't usually treated any differently than any other hero, despite his status as an alien hybrid being well known. However, his own treatment of people of his own race is very much filled with this trope. During the story arc when he first discovers his heritage, he at first reasons that he can't be a Skrull, and that his mother can't be a Skrull, because they're both so ordinary as far as humans go. Later, when he mentions wanting the Kree and Skrull forces to stop fighting, he makes a comment about how the Skrulls are "my people," with Billy, his boyfriend, responding with "They're '''not''' your people. They're not even '''people'''." Wolverine even gives justification as to why it's okay to use lethal force against Skrulls in this story, claiming that "They're Skrulls. [[GoodThingYouCanHeal They'll grow back.]] Eventually." In later story lines, despite having accepted his heritage, it's still obvious that everyone still considers him a human, and that he considers himself a human, and he keeps treating the Skrulls as an alien species that he can't relate to, which sometimes makes him come across like a BoomerangBigot.

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* Completely and utterly [[DefiedTrope defied]] in the ComicBook/{{Invincible}} ''ComicBook/{{Invincible}}'' spin-off ''Guarding the Globe.'' When [[spoiler:Japandroid sacrifices herself to stop a global parasite infection, her death is treated ''exactly'' the same as if she was human. No one even mentions that she was a robot.]]
* An interesting case is with Hulkling in ComicBook/YoungAvengers.''ComicBook/YoungAvengers''. He isn't usually treated any differently than any other hero, despite his status as an alien hybrid being well known. However, his own treatment of people of his own race is very much filled with this trope. During the story arc when he first discovers his heritage, he at first reasons that he can't be a Skrull, and that his mother can't be a Skrull, because they're both so ordinary as far as humans go. Later, when he mentions wanting the Kree and Skrull forces to stop fighting, he makes a comment about how the Skrulls are "my people," with Billy, his boyfriend, responding with "They're '''not''' your people. They're not even '''people'''." Wolverine even gives justification as to why it's okay to use lethal force against Skrulls in this story, claiming that "They're Skrulls. [[GoodThingYouCanHeal They'll grow back.]] Eventually." In later story lines, despite having accepted his heritage, it's still obvious that everyone still considers him a human, and that he considers himself a human, and he keeps treating the Skrulls as an alien species that he can't relate to, which sometimes makes him come across like a BoomerangBigot.
19th Mar '17 10:32:36 AM Sammettik
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*** Of course, Xenomorphs are highly dangerous invasive species that exist only to conduct a genocidal propagation method of their own species; they breed incessantly, wiping out all life that is viable as a host, then go dormant and wait for spacefaring lifeforms to find them and become new breeding hosts, transporting them to new places to infest. Franchise/{{Superman}} ''not'' killing them frankly elicits a WhatAnIdiot reaction more than Batman's killing them
11th Dec '16 4:06:18 AM IdumeanPatriot
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** The X-Men have also been on the ''receiving'' end of this. Since they belong to the [[ArtisticLicenseBiology mutant]] species ''Homo superior'', they are technically nonhuman (though closely related) hominids... And many of the [[FantasticRacism anti-mutant villains]] in the setting consider them exactly that, treating them about as considerately as they would human-like but evil and dangerous aliens or vampires.
26th Nov '16 6:59:32 AM StFan
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* [[WhatMeasureIsANonHuman/{{DCAU}} DC Animated Universe]]

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* [[WhatMeasureIsANonHuman/{{DCAU}} DC Animated Universe]]
WhatMeasureIsANonHuman/DCAnimatedUniverse
24th Sep '16 12:36:55 PM Scorntex
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* ''ComicBook/ArchieComicsSonicTheHedgehog'' explored this concerning Nicole the Holo-Lynx with the ''Sonic Universe'' storyline "Spark of Life". Dr. Ellidy, Nicole's [[spoiler:accidental]] creator, is very put off around Nicole [[spoiler:due to the fact that Nicole was actually his daughter, Nikki, who died during an attempt to save her life by digitizing her.]] This attitude concerns Sally, who even asks Big the Cat his thoughts on Nicole, who likes her just because she's nice. When the digital lifeform Phage causes trouble in Ellidy's systems and Nicole's in danger, Sally opts to be digitized herself to save her friend. When Ellidy tries to stop Sally from doing it because she's a princess risking her life, she essentially puts him in his place by telling him to never suggest that Nicole isn't a person worth saving.

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* ''ComicBook/ArchieComicsSonicTheHedgehog'' explored this concerning Nicole the Holo-Lynx with the ''Sonic Universe'' storyline "Spark of Life". Dr. Ellidy, Nicole's [[spoiler:accidental]] creator, is very put off around Nicole [[spoiler:due to the fact that Nicole was actually his daughter, Nikki, who died during an attempt to save her life by digitizing her.]] This attitude concerns Sally, who even asks Big the Cat his thoughts on Nicole, who likes her just because she's nice. When the digital lifeform Phage causes trouble in Ellidy's systems and Nicole's in danger, Sally opts to be digitized herself to save her friend. When Ellidy tries to stop Sally from doing it because she's a princess risking her life, she essentially puts him in his place by telling him to never suggest that Nicole isn't a person worth saving.saving.
* An ''ComicBook/AgeOfUltron'' tie-in has a harsh aversion. Ultron's drone army are just mechanical drones, but they're considered just alive enough to kick the Ebony Blade's curse (which is fuelled by taking life) into overdrive, leaving the Black Knight out of the action.
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20th Sep '16 1:45:55 AM Tron80
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* The Bizarros in [[UsefulNotes/TheSilverAgeOfComicBooks Silver Age]] Franchise/{{Superman}} stories were another example. Made of "non-living matter", having them killed off was often a source for comedy; they even made a meteor plunge into one of their cities and kill a lot of Bizarros, on the grounds that Bizarros do things backwards so they want to maximize casualties. This was played as a pure joke.
* Comicbook/GhostRider, at least in his 90s incarnation, did not kill even the most inhuman of humans, to the point where his apparent destruction of a ninja in one issue was retconned into that single particular ninja actually being a robot. However, he was quite happy to maim and slaughter demons and other AlwaysChaoticEvil beings, in one instance tying the photosensitive pseudovampire Blackout to the spire of the Empire State Building and letting him die a horrific burning death as the sun came up. Blackout didn't actually die and popped up on the Raft about fifteen years later, but Ghost Rider had no way of knowing that.
* Another classic Superman story from # 314 (back in 1977): Superman is faced with a dangerous alien Jevik, who he intends to destroy. When questioned about how he can kill when he has a [[ThouShaltNotKill code against killing]], he replies that Jevik is not really alive. When Jevik's heart begins to beat, Superman says that somehow he's come alive, and Superman can't kill him. Apparently for Superman, if you don't have a heartbeat he can do anything he wants to you; merely being able to walk, talk, and act on your own doesn't qualify.

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* Franchise/{{Superman}}:
**
The Bizarros in [[UsefulNotes/TheSilverAgeOfComicBooks Silver Age]] Franchise/{{Superman}} stories were another example. Made of "non-living matter", having them killed off was often a source for comedy; they even made a meteor plunge into one of their cities and kill a lot of Bizarros, on the grounds that Bizarros do things backwards so they want to maximize casualties. This was played as a pure joke.
* Comicbook/GhostRider, at least ** In Comicbook/{{Supergirl}}/Comicbook/{{Batgirl}} story ''ComicBook/ElseworldsFinestSupergirlAndBatgirl'', Comicbook/LexLuthor [[spoiler:murdered a baby -who in his 90s incarnation, did another world would have become Superman-]] and thinks nothing of it because it was an alien, not kill even the most inhuman of humans, to the point where his apparent destruction of a ninja in one issue was retconned into that single particular ninja actually being a robot. However, he was quite happy to maim and slaughter demons and other AlwaysChaoticEvil beings, in one instance tying the photosensitive pseudovampire Blackout to the spire of the Empire State Building and letting him die a horrific burning death as the sun came up. Blackout didn't actually die and popped up on the Raft about fifteen years later, but Ghost Rider had no way of knowing that.
*
human.
**
Another classic Superman story from # 314 (back in 1977): Superman is faced with a dangerous alien Jevik, who he intends to destroy. When questioned about how he can kill when he has a [[ThouShaltNotKill code against killing]], he replies that Jevik is not really alive. When Jevik's heart begins to beat, Superman says that somehow he's come alive, and Superman can't kill him. Apparently for Superman, if you don't have a heartbeat he can do anything he wants to you; merely being able to walk, talk, and act on your own doesn't qualify.



* On the other hand, the Comicbook/{{Legion of Super-Heroes}}'s [[ThouShaltNotKill official rule against killing]] extends to anything sentient, including [=AIs=].

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** In the reviled ''ComicBook/SupermanAtEarthsEnd'', Superman uses "you're just an android, '''''[[MemeticMutation I AM A MAN!!]]'''''" as justification when he ''punches Ben Boxer's guts out''. There are ''many'' things wrong with this, least among them the fact that Ben Boxer is about as close to human as you can be, with emotions, a personality, and ''brothers''. Oh, and ''intestines''. This guy has ''relatives'' and can ''poop'', man, that doesn't sound all that inhuman to me. Superman then condescends to him further, claiming that Ben is "only doing what your creators programmed you to do"... even though Ben actually has free will and makes his own decisions.
* Comicbook/GhostRider, at least in his 90s incarnation, did not kill even the most inhuman of humans, to the point where his apparent destruction of a ninja in one issue was retconned into that single particular ninja actually being a robot. However, he was quite happy to maim and slaughter demons and other AlwaysChaoticEvil beings, in one instance tying the photosensitive pseudovampire Blackout to the spire of the Empire State Building and letting him die a horrific burning death as the sun came up. Blackout didn't actually die and popped up on the Raft about fifteen years later, but Ghost Rider had no way of knowing that.
* On the other hand, the Comicbook/{{Legion of Super-Heroes}}'s Comicbook/LegionOfSuperHeroes's [[ThouShaltNotKill official rule against killing]] extends to anything sentient, including [=AIs=].



* In the reviled ''ComicBook/SupermanAtEarthsEnd'', Superman uses "you're just an android, '''''[[MemeticMutation I AM A MAN!!]]'''''" as justification when he ''punches Ben Boxer's guts out''. There are ''many'' things wrong with this, least among them the fact that Ben Boxer is about as close to human as you can be, with emotions, a personality, and ''brothers''. Oh, and ''intestines''. This guy has ''relatives'' and can ''poop'', man, that doesn't sound all that inhuman to me. Superman then condescends to him further, claiming that Ben is "only doing what your creators programmed you to do"... even though Ben actually has free will and makes his own decisions.
** He has no centralized circulatory system active (see above)?
22nd Aug '16 6:22:19 AM Morgenthaler
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* Speaking of ''ComicBook/JudgeDredd'', their twist on the matter involved an alien shapeshifter escaping to the Big Meg to get out of slavery. Dredd, who wants to arrest the shapeshifter for murder, is partnered with an alien administrator who wants to return it to its owners. The shapeshifter is finally left with the decision to either stay in Megacity One, where he counts as a sentient being and is therefore subject to the city's comically strict justice and faces a long prison term, or return to Alientown, where, legally counting as property, he can not be held culpable for his actions, but will remain a slave.
** Also in Dredd, robots are sentient and ''exactly'' like humans, but are still a slave race and abused. Dredd himself is responsible for destroying a robot revolution and sending everyone ''back'' to slavery. (Usually the writing is on the side of the robots, as is reader sympathy.) Note that Dredd himself is a robot-rights supporter; the only reason he shut down that particular revolution is because the robot leading the revolution was clearly evil.

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* Speaking of ''ComicBook/JudgeDredd'', their ''ComicBook/TwoThousandAD'':
** ''ComicBook/JudgeDredd'':
*** Their
twist on the matter involved an alien shapeshifter escaping to the Big Meg to get out of slavery. Dredd, who wants to arrest the shapeshifter for murder, is partnered with an alien administrator who wants to return it to its owners. The shapeshifter is finally left with the decision to either stay in Megacity One, where he counts as a sentient being and is therefore subject to the city's comically strict justice and faces a long prison term, or return to Alientown, where, legally counting as property, he can not be held culpable for his actions, but will remain a slave.
** Also in Dredd, robots *** Robots are sentient and ''exactly'' like humans, but are still a slave race and abused. Dredd himself is responsible for destroying a robot revolution and sending everyone ''back'' to slavery. (Usually the writing is on the side of the robots, as is reader sympathy.) Note that Dredd himself is a robot-rights supporter; the only reason he shut down that particular revolution is because the robot leading the revolution was clearly evil.evil.
** ''ComicBook/{{XTNCT}}'': Humans use genetically engineered animals to fight their wars for them, and are able to discard or replace them just as easily.
2nd Apr '16 5:46:02 AM Gerusz
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* WhatMeasureIsANonHuman/DCAnimatedUniverse

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* WhatMeasureIsANonHuman/DCAnimatedUniverse
[[WhatMeasureIsANonHuman/{{DCAU}} DC Animated Universe]]
28th Feb '16 9:15:29 AM nombretomado
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* ComicBook/SpiderMan nearly did this in an issue of ''Comicbook/GhostRider''. He was facing the vampire queen, Lilith and a host of the undead. He attempted to use Johnny Blaze's gun on them, explaining that "They're already dead". In team ups with {{Blade}}, he has also not seemed to care much about vampires getting killed. This is the same guy who will box your ears if you try to kill Carnage, a super-powered serial killer.

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* ComicBook/SpiderMan nearly did this in an issue of ''Comicbook/GhostRider''. He was facing the vampire queen, Lilith and a host of the undead. He attempted to use Johnny Blaze's gun on them, explaining that "They're already dead". In team ups with {{Blade}}, ComicBook/{{Blade}}, he has also not seemed to care much about vampires getting killed. This is the same guy who will box your ears if you try to kill Carnage, a super-powered serial killer.
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