History WhatHappenedToTheMouse / ComicBooks

14th May '16 1:13:36 AM Doug86
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* Things like this used to happen constantly in Marvel titles. In 1993 ''Comicbook/{{X-Men}}'' titles alone, there was Scott Summers' long-lost second brother (mentioned but never found, and soon forgotten by everybody) and {{Wolverine}}'s recurring vision of a tree with radiators growing out of it (never explained).

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* Things like this used to happen constantly in Marvel titles. In 1993 ''Comicbook/{{X-Men}}'' ''Comicbook/XMen'' titles alone, there was Scott Summers' long-lost second brother (mentioned but never found, and soon forgotten by everybody) and {{Wolverine}}'s recurring vision of a tree with radiators growing out of it (never explained).
15th Apr '16 8:17:46 PM TheNerevarine
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* ''ComicBook/WarlordOfMars'' had Thuvia, Princess of Ptarth. She is introduced as a supporting character that in [[Literature/JohnCarterOfMars the source material]] would later be upgraded to [[Ascended Extra main protagonist]] in the fourth book ''Thuvia, Maid of Mars''. After the story arc that adapted the third book in the series was concluded, she was never seen or referenced again in the comics, which by that point went on a completely different direction than the books.

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* ''ComicBook/WarlordOfMars'' had Thuvia, Princess of Ptarth. She is introduced as a supporting character that in [[Literature/JohnCarterOfMars the source material]] would later be upgraded to [[Ascended Extra [[AscendedExtra main protagonist]] in the fourth book ''Thuvia, Maid of Mars''. After the story arc that adapted the third book in the series was concluded, she was never seen or referenced again in the comics, which by that point went on a completely different direction than the books.
15th Apr '16 8:17:19 PM TheNerevarine
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* ''ComicBook/WarlordOfMars'' had Thuvia, Princess of Ptarth. She is introduced as a supporting character that in [[Literature/JohnCarterOfMars the source material]] would later be upgraded to [[Ascended Extra main protagonist]] in the fourth book ''Thuvia, Maid of Mars''. After the story arc that adapted the third book in the series was concluded, she was never seen or referenced again in the comics, which by that point went on a completely different direction than the books.
28th Feb '16 7:26:04 PM nombretomado
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* CaptainAmerica's "Midnight In Greymoor Castle!" story, the final UsefulNotes/WorldWarII period story in ''Tales of Suspense'' in the 1960s, had Rogers leave his unit in the field to help Bucky who has been captured and held in a castle in Britain. Although Cap later saves his besieged unit by smashing their attackers with a V-2 missile, the fact remains that Rogers is suspected of desertion and thus in serious trouble. In the next story, the series returns to the present day with Cap telling that story and the Scarlet Witch asking if he got in trouble and Cap simply explains that US military intelligence covered for him.

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* CaptainAmerica's ComicBook/CaptainAmerica's "Midnight In Greymoor Castle!" story, the final UsefulNotes/WorldWarII period story in ''Tales of Suspense'' in the 1960s, had Rogers leave his unit in the field to help Bucky who has been captured and held in a castle in Britain. Although Cap later saves his besieged unit by smashing their attackers with a V-2 missile, the fact remains that Rogers is suspected of desertion and thus in serious trouble. In the next story, the series returns to the present day with Cap telling that story and the Scarlet Witch asking if he got in trouble and Cap simply explains that US military intelligence covered for him.
13th Jan '16 12:46:21 AM Doug86
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* In 1987, a {{Superman}} story written by Marv Wolfman introduced the villain Constantine Stratos, an insane Greek millionaire who fancied himself the scion of the gods of Olympus and used a WeatherControlMachine to attack Superman. Superman destroyed the machine, but was not able to save Stratos, whom he believed was killed when his machine exploded. The end of the issue revealed that Stratos was very much alive and had been altered by his exploding machinery so he now could manipulate the weather by himself, without his technology. He was last seen swearing vengeance on Superman. This was in 1987, and he was never even mentioned again ..

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* In 1987, a {{Superman}} Franchise/{{Superman}} story written by Marv Wolfman introduced the villain Constantine Stratos, an insane Greek millionaire who fancied himself the scion of the gods of Olympus and used a WeatherControlMachine to attack Superman. Superman destroyed the machine, but was not able to save Stratos, whom he believed was killed when his machine exploded. The end of the issue revealed that Stratos was very much alive and had been altered by his exploding machinery so he now could manipulate the weather by himself, without his technology. He was last seen swearing vengeance on Superman. This was in 1987, and he was never even mentioned again ..again.
16th Oct '15 4:42:04 PM nombretomado
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* In ''{{Planetary}}'', an early issue has the team invading a secret installation where scientists are attempting to create a fictional Earth and give it substance. They succeed, but someone escapes from the fictional Earth and goes on a killing spree. The issue ends with a caption telling us that he is still at large. He is never seen or mentioned again, except for a quick mention in the final issue, where Elijah basically says they've given up on looking for him.

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* In ''{{Planetary}}'', ''ComicBook/{{Planetary}}'', an early issue has the team invading a secret installation where scientists are attempting to create a fictional Earth and give it substance. They succeed, but someone escapes from the fictional Earth and goes on a killing spree. The issue ends with a caption telling us that he is still at large. He is never seen or mentioned again, except for a quick mention in the final issue, where Elijah basically says they've given up on looking for him.
27th Aug '15 8:49:52 PM lalalei2001
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* In Archie's ''[[ComicBook/ArchieComicsSonicTheHedgehog Sonic the Hedgehog]]'', Sonic and Sally were in a romantic relationship before Sally was "killed" in #225, then brought back only to be roboticized in #230. Ever since they were reunited (in #256), their relationship was seemingly dropped without reason or explanation. While a ContinuityReboot did happen in the interrim, Sonic and Sally both retained memories of the old world, so that can't be used as an excuse.
** It's worth noting, however, this is one instance where this trope is generally seen as [[TropesAreNotBad a good thing]]. The RomanticPlotTumor created by Sonic and Sally's relationship is something that plagued the comic for ''years'', and the last time Archie tried to excise it, it resulted in the infamous "slap", which is considered by many to be the absolute lowest point in the entire comic's history (basically, Sally's entire character was defiled for the sole purpose of breaking the two up). By simply quietly dropping the relationship, Archie carries on the comic without altering Sonic's or Sally's character drastically, and allows the two characters to develop independently of one another.
27th Aug '15 8:48:49 PM SparksOfTheTempest
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* In Archie's ''[[ComicBook/ArchieComicsSonicTheHedgehog Sonic the Hedgehog'', Sonic and Sally were in a romantic relationship before Sally was "killed" in #225, then brought back only to be roboticized in #230. Ever since they were reunited (in #256), their relationship was seemingly dropped without reason or explanation. While a ContinuityReboot did happen in the interrim, Sonic and Sally both retained memories of the old world, so that can't be used as an excuse.

to:

* In Archie's ''[[ComicBook/ArchieComicsSonicTheHedgehog Sonic the Hedgehog'', Hedgehog]]'', Sonic and Sally were in a romantic relationship before Sally was "killed" in #225, then brought back only to be roboticized in #230. Ever since they were reunited (in #256), their relationship was seemingly dropped without reason or explanation. While a ContinuityReboot did happen in the interrim, Sonic and Sally both retained memories of the old world, so that can't be used as an excuse.
27th Aug '15 8:48:23 PM SparksOfTheTempest
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Added DiffLines:

* In Archie's ''[[ComicBook/ArchieComicsSonicTheHedgehog Sonic the Hedgehog'', Sonic and Sally were in a romantic relationship before Sally was "killed" in #225, then brought back only to be roboticized in #230. Ever since they were reunited (in #256), their relationship was seemingly dropped without reason or explanation. While a ContinuityReboot did happen in the interrim, Sonic and Sally both retained memories of the old world, so that can't be used as an excuse.
** It's worth noting, however, this is one instance where this trope is generally seen as [[TropesAreNotBad a good thing]]. The RomanticPlotTumor created by Sonic and Sally's relationship is something that plagued the comic for ''years'', and the last time Archie tried to excise it, it resulted in the infamous "slap", which is considered by many to be the absolute lowest point in the entire comic's history (basically, Sally's entire character was defiled for the sole purpose of breaking the two up). By simply quietly dropping the relationship, Archie carries on the comic without altering Sonic's or Sally's character drastically, and allows the two characters to develop independently of one another.
17th Apr '15 12:28:24 AM JUANDELACRUZ
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** Numerous ''X-Men'' titles introduce characters who are prominent for a while then generally disappear. For example, ''X-treme X-Men'' introduces Lifeguard and Slipstream, who are important members of the team until Slipstream goes nuts and runs away. Lifeguard leaves with [[TheScrappy Thunderbird]] to find him, putting them on the proverbial bus. Thunderbird and Lifeguard resurfaced in the early 00s "Excalibur" series; Slipstream didn't.

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** Numerous ''X-Men'' titles introduce characters who are prominent for a while then generally disappear. For example, ''X-treme X-Men'' introduces Lifeguard and Slipstream, who are important members of the team until Slipstream goes nuts and runs away. Lifeguard leaves with [[TheScrappy Thunderbird]] to find him, putting them on the proverbial bus. Thunderbird and Lifeguard resurfaced in ''a single panel'' in the early 00s "Excalibur" series; Thunderbird and Slipstream didn't.didn't.
*** It was later revealed in an official Handbook that Thunderbird and Lifeguard retained their powers after the Decimation while Slipstream was depowered. Lifeguard was also mentioned to have joined the Xmen in San Francisco on Utopia, but no word on what happened to her brother or her boyfriend.
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