History WesternAnimation / TheAmazingWorldOfGumball

25th Mar '17 5:18:23 PM mariofan1000
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* DeconstructorFleet: Skewers pretty much every cartoon and sitcom trope it comes across. However, it tends to do this less through subverting them or [[RealityEnsues applying logic to them,]] but by taking tropes that normally tend to be taken for granted (such as ChuckCunninghamSyndrome, NotAllowedToGrowUp, StatusQuoIsGod and SnapBack) and having characters [[MediumAwareness acknowledge and question them]], leading to a lot of FridgeHorror. ([[Recap/TheAmazingWorldOfGumballS3E12TheVoid "The Void"]], [[Recap/TheAmazingWorldOfGumballS3E1TheKids "The Kids"]], [[Recap/TheAmazingWorldOfGumballS2E8TheJob "The Job"]], [[Recap/TheAmazingWorldOfGumballS2e40TheFinale "The Finale"]])
25th Mar '17 4:42:51 PM mariofan1000
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* DomesticAbuse: [[Recap/TheAmazingWorldOfGumballS5E5TheChoices "The Choices"]] flashes back to the day Nicole met Richard, and examines what her life would have been like if [[ForWantOfANail she made different choices that day.]] One of those has Harold (Tobias' father) manipulating Nicole into marrying her, making her get hideous plastic surgery, and constantly treating her like dirt. Him demeaning her for having the sushi be too cold is the RageBreakingPoint that causes her to set the house on fire, possibly killing Harold while she screams "IS THAT HOT ENOUGH FOR YOU?". [[BlackComedyBurst This is played for laughs.]]
25th Mar '17 4:06:01 PM mariofan1000
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* ForgotToMindHead: One episode has Gumball communing with the newly-gotten fish under the kitchen table. It is there that Gumball deduces that the fish is intelligent, at which he jumps for joy. Naturally, Gumball knocks his noggin on the table's underside. When the fish tries to speak to Gumball, the excited kitten is ready to jump for joy again, but this time, dons a helmet before doing so.
25th Mar '17 4:04:25 PM mariofan1000
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* DenserAndWackier: As the animation improved (from season two to now), the plots went from being light and innocent to having more manic, often dark, humor and being even less subdued.

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* DarkerAndEdgier / DenserAndWackier: As Manages to be both simultaneously. Season 1 took fairly realistic, lighthearted SliceOfLife plots and contrasted them with the animation improved (from surreal, wacky world of the show. From season two to now), 2 onwards, however, the humor got much darker, [[Radar/TheAmazingWorldOfGumball raunchier]], and less subdued, Gumball TookALevelInJerkass, and an actual story arc involving a genuinely dangerous villain and the idea that [[spoiler: the uinverse is sentient and controlling the world]] emerged. At the same time, however, the episode plots went from being light became increasingly surreal and innocent nonsensical, [[NoFourthWall the fourth wall started to having more manic, often dark, humor disappear,]] and being even less subdued.[[BizarroEpisode Bizarro Episodes]] started to become the norm. The end result of this is the show [[TropesAreTools becoming far funnier.]]
25th Mar '17 3:44:31 PM mariofan1000
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* FilmingForEasyDub: One [[Radar/TheAmazingWorldOfGumball particularly dubious]] exchange between Gumball and Darwin in [[Recap/TheAmazingWorldOfGumballS5E3TheBoredom "The Boredom"]] occurs with their mouths off-screen, possibly indicating that the producers expected it to be cut and didn't want to have to reanimate the scene.
16th Mar '17 7:42:46 PM Vir
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* {{Calvinball}}: "Dodge or Dare" (later "Dodj or Daar"), a board game that Gumball and Darwin created, which involves taking a card and doing whatever is says on it. The trope applies in that, while the concept is (very loosely) structured with a set of "rules", the "rules" themselves are only there to ensure that ''sheer chaos'' results from playing it. In "The Car", Gumball is told to build a RubeGoldbergDevice in order to launch a projectile into the air using anything found in the trash. The projectile in question is a bowling ball, and when it finally fires off, it malfunctions and launches right at Gumball's face. Right before it hits him, Darwin ''pauses'' the moment like a VCR (complete with line of static and jumpy tracking) to point out that the card says that Gumball can't use his hands to block, leading to him getting his face smashed in. [[TheGamePlaysYou The game has the power to cosmically enforce the rules, changing the laws of physics as needed]]. It nearly kills the entire Watterson family in "The Game" when they draw a card saying that nobody can breathe until the game is over.

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* {{Calvinball}}: "Dodge or Dare" (later "Dodj or Daar"), a board game that Gumball and Darwin created, which involves taking a card and doing whatever is it says on it. The trope applies in that, while the concept is (very loosely) structured with a set of "rules", the "rules" themselves are only there to ensure that ''sheer chaos'' results from playing it. In "The Car", Gumball is told to build a RubeGoldbergDevice in order to launch a projectile into the air using anything found in the trash. The projectile in question is a bowling ball, and when it finally fires off, it malfunctions and launches right at Gumball's face. Right before it hits him, Darwin ''pauses'' the moment like a VCR (complete with line of static and jumpy tracking) to point out that the card says that Gumball can't use his hands to block, leading to him getting his face smashed in. [[TheGamePlaysYou The game has the power to cosmically enforce the rules, changing the laws of physics as needed]]. It nearly kills the entire Watterson family in "The Game" when they draw a card saying that nobody can breathe until the game is over.


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** When something explodes, it's normally followed by a SmashCut, such as the Rainbow Factory in "The Fan", Mr. Robinson's heart monitor at the end of "The Boss", and Rob's exploding burger that he was going to use to destroy Banana Joe (but Gumball ate instead) in "The Ex".
13th Mar '17 3:32:33 PM mariofan1000
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You can check out the show's Recap page [[Recap/TheAmazingWorldOfGumball here]] and the character page [[Characters/TheAmazingWorldOfGumball here]]. It also has a page for [[Trivia/TheAmazingWorldOfGumball trivia]] and [[ShoutOut/TheAmazingWorldOfGumball Shout Outs]]. Please list examples relating to specific episodes and characters on the corresponding page.

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You can check out the show's Recap page [[Recap/TheAmazingWorldOfGumball here]] and the character page [[Characters/TheAmazingWorldOfGumball here]]. It also has a page for [[Trivia/TheAmazingWorldOfGumball trivia]] and [[ShoutOut/TheAmazingWorldOfGumball Shout Outs]]. There's also a [[http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/crowner.php/BestEpisode/TheAmazingWorldOfGumball best episode crowner.]] Please list examples relating to specific episodes and characters on the corresponding page.
11th Mar '17 6:11:24 AM DRCEQ
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* WeAllLiveInAmerica: The show's creative staff are mostly British and French (including the creator), most of the cast are British, and animation is done in London, Germany, and (in the first season) Ireland. Although any connection Elmore has to real life geography is [[FantasyKitchenSink tenuous at best]], it is located in the United States, yet some UsefulNotes/BritishEnglish and other culturally Euro-specific bits slip by:
** Cars are sometimes shown driving on the lane to the driver's left instead of the right.
** The scenes inside stores in such episodes as "The Fridge", "The Castle", and "The Limit" have the prices depicted with a comma separating the dollar and cents values (which is common in Europe) rather than a decimal point (which is common in America). Weight may also be listed in kilograms instead of pounds.
** Listings for amounts of money (like the bank statement in "The Treasure" and a price for a frozen chicken in "The Fridge") will sometimes have the dollar sign after the number amount (where a Euro sign is usually put in Germany), instead of before it (American).
** The show's website states Miss Simian is a second grade teacher when most of her students are twelve years old. In the UK, the second grade of secondary school is the equivalent of the seventh grade in the United States. Someone on the writing staff appeared to have noticed this, as Gumball instead states he and Darwin will be "the only seventh graders with beards" if they fail their math test in "The Lesson"
** Dates are often listed as day first, followed by the month. In America, it's the other way around. Examples include a suspension form shown in "The Apology" and a date stamp on a weather program in "The Laziest".
** Various doors and signs are labelled "W.C." for "water closet", a term for "bathroom" or "(a room with a) toilet" that isn't typically used in the U.S.. Gumball's {{emoticon}}-based chat with Penny in "The Romantic" has a "W.C." placard used to mean "bathroom" and whenever there's a scene in the mall, there's a placard showing directions to the "W.C" rather than the men's/women's bathrooms.
** In "The End", Richard sees there are a bunch of people in front of them at the checkout and shouts "[[RightOnQueue Queue!]]", but the more common term in America is "line".
** A sign in "The Third" lists distance in meters instead of feet or yards.
** In "The Laziest", a digital clock on a car radio uses a period instead of a colon to separate the hour from the minutes, something usually only done in Germany.
** In "The Car", the flashback of the last time Gumball, Darwin, and Richard played "Dodj or Daar" had the house on fire. The incoming fire siren is the lower sounding kind used in Europe.
** In an EasterEgg in "The Remote", a sign states "Strictly no Kung-Fu Fighting in The Car Park." A "car park" is what Americans call a "parking garage" or a "parking lot." The episode "The Coach" also had Coach refer to a parking lot as a "car park."
** Nicole and Granny Jojo have an argument in "The Authority" about which way to look first before crossing the road. Granny Jojo says you see the closer oncoming cars first by looking to your ''right'', which is only true with left-handed traffic.
** In "The Tag", Richard gets out a bag of "Nacho Crisps" when he finds his bathtub filled with melted cheese. In America, "crisps" are referred to as "chips".
** In "The Lesson," Principal Brown's pin-up calendar for Miss Simian starts at Monday and ends at Sunday. American calendars are laid out so Sunday is the start of the week and Saturday is the end. Likewise for the Hexagon Lady's computer planner that gets erased by the Internet on "The Love".
** In "The Coach", a stammering Gumball's subtitle reads "apologised" instead of the American spelling "apologized". Likewise captioned bird speak in "The Extras" uses "realise" ("Dude, you do realise that I'm a guy?") instead of "realize".
** In "The Joy", the bloodied clock shown throughout the episode uses a twenty-four hour clock[[note]]meaning that every time after noon is expressed as 1300, 1400, 1500, etc[[/note]], something more common in Europe than the US (unless you are in the military or working in a job that calls for using the 24-hour clock instead of the 12-hour clock, like an airline pilot or a foreign diplomat), but still uses "AM" and "PM" on top of that (which is only used for the 12-hour clock system that the US has). Other episodes that show time by the 24-hour clock instead of 12-hour include "The Laziest" (Larry's car radio), "The Uploads," (Richard's computer during his video game review has the time as 15:36 instead of 3:36pm), and "The Parking" (in the shot of Richard spraypainting a parking space, there's a placard in the parking garage showing the opening and closing times, with 24h [midnight] as the closing time).
** In "The Name", The Crocodile Woman refers to the fat under her arms as "bingo wings", which is more of a British term. Though it is used in American slang sometimes, the term "lunchlady arms" to describe fatty upper arms on a woman is used more often.
** A subtle one: in both "The Extras" (after Gary the Purple Moose attacks the shooting star host of ''Win or Don't Win'') and "The Lie" (when the Sluzzle Tag holiday special cuts off because the network could only make a few minutes of the show due to how lengthy animation is and how recent the holday is), a TV cuts to a colorful test card with a circle in the middle as a frowny face with X's for eyes. That card is actually based on [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Testcard#mediaviewer/File:PM5544_with_non-PAL_signals.png a real one]] used in the United Kingdom; the American equivalent is [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Testcard#mediaviewer/File:SMPTE_Color_Bars.svg the SMPTE color bars]].
** Another subtle example is how a weatherman in "The Law" says the temperature is 122 degrees Fahrenheit. This seems like a randomly specific number...unless you know that's exactly 50 degrees Celsius.
** In "The Pizza", during his goodbye phone call, Larry mentions a pizza special that cost "five dollars ninety-nine". In the U.S., $5.99 is usually said either as "five dollars and ninety-nine cents" or "five ninety-nine".
** In "The Butterfly," Karen is shown working at the Elmore "Emergency Call Cent'''re'''", instead of "Center".
** In "The Traitor," Alan tells Gumball and Darwin that he took his mom to the cinema before taking her to the hospital. "Cinema" is the British way of saying "the movies" or "the movie theater"; in American English, "cinema" is used as either an adjective to describe movies or a collective noun for a certain genre of films.
** When Richard is looking for something to fix the broken TV in "The Authority", he finds a coupon for TV repair. The phone number is shown as 0454 454 963 02, which is the UK/continental European format of writing telephone numbers rather than the American format.
** In "The Burden", Principal Brown tells Darwin and Gumball to "clear your diaries" when they need to take care of the school hamster. In "The Love", the black hexagon lady says she can't go on a date because "...my diary is full". Both are using the word "diary" to mean "a day planner/calendar", [[SeparatedByACommonLanguage a meaning that's used in the UK, but not the US]].
** Similar to the "centre/center" spelling difference in "The Butterfly", Gumball's subtitle in "The Misunderstandings" ("If you weren't such an anaemic chicken, you would defend her honor...") uses the British spelling of "anemic" (which actually uses the "ash" [æ] grapheme when spelled out) rather than the American spelling, which doesn't use this at all.
** In "The Ex", when Gumball is fiddling around with a cell phone while trying to help out his now-ex nemesis Rob, he says he was trying to take a picture but turned the torch (flashlight) on by mistake.

to:

* WeAllLiveInAmerica: The show's creative staff are mostly British and French (including the creator), most of the cast are British, and animation is done in London, Germany, and (in the first season) Ireland. Although any connection Elmore has to real life geography is [[FantasyKitchenSink tenuous at best]], it is located in the United States, yet some UsefulNotes/BritishEnglish and other culturally Euro-specific bits slip by:
** Cars are sometimes shown driving on the lane to the driver's left instead of the right.
** The scenes inside stores in such episodes as "The Fridge", "The Castle", and "The Limit" have the prices depicted with a comma separating the dollar and cents values (which is common in Europe) rather than a decimal point (which is common in America). Weight may also be listed in kilograms instead of pounds.
** Listings for amounts of money (like the bank statement in "The Treasure" and a price for a frozen chicken in "The Fridge") will sometimes have the dollar sign after the number amount (where a Euro sign is usually put in Germany), instead of before it (American).
** The show's website states Miss Simian is a second grade teacher when most of her students are twelve years old. In the UK, the second grade of secondary school is the equivalent of the seventh grade in the United States. Someone on the writing staff appeared to have noticed this, as Gumball instead states he and Darwin will be "the only seventh graders with beards" if they fail their math test in "The Lesson"
** Dates are often listed as day first, followed by the month. In America, it's the other way around. Examples include a suspension form shown in "The Apology" and a date stamp on a weather program in "The Laziest".
** Various doors and signs are labelled "W.C." for "water closet", a term for "bathroom" or "(a room with a) toilet" that isn't typically used in the U.S.. Gumball's {{emoticon}}-based chat with Penny in "The Romantic" has a "W.C." placard used to mean "bathroom" and whenever there's a scene in the mall, there's a placard showing directions to the "W.C" rather than the men's/women's bathrooms.
** In "The End", Richard sees there are a bunch of people in front of them at the checkout and shouts "[[RightOnQueue Queue!]]", but the more common term in America is "line".
** A sign in "The Third" lists distance in meters instead of feet or yards.
** In "The Laziest", a digital clock on a car radio uses a period instead of a colon to separate the hour from the minutes, something usually only done in Germany.
** In "The Car", the flashback of the last time Gumball, Darwin, and Richard played "Dodj or Daar" had the house on fire. The incoming fire siren is the lower sounding kind used in Europe.
** In an EasterEgg in "The Remote", a sign states "Strictly no Kung-Fu Fighting in The Car Park." A "car park" is what Americans call a "parking garage" or a "parking lot." The episode "The Coach" also had Coach refer to a parking lot as a "car park."
** Nicole and Granny Jojo have an argument in "The Authority" about which way to look first before crossing the road. Granny Jojo says you see the closer oncoming cars first by looking to your ''right'', which is only true with left-handed traffic.
** In "The Tag", Richard gets out a bag of "Nacho Crisps" when he finds his bathtub filled with melted cheese. In America, "crisps" are referred to as "chips".
** In "The Lesson," Principal Brown's pin-up calendar for Miss Simian starts at Monday and ends at Sunday. American calendars are laid out so Sunday is the start of the week and Saturday is the end. Likewise for the Hexagon Lady's computer planner that gets erased by the Internet on "The Love".
** In "The Coach", a stammering Gumball's subtitle reads "apologised" instead of the American spelling "apologized". Likewise captioned bird speak in "The Extras" uses "realise" ("Dude, you do realise that I'm a guy?") instead of "realize".
** In "The Joy", the bloodied clock shown throughout the episode uses a twenty-four hour clock[[note]]meaning that every time after noon is expressed as 1300, 1400, 1500, etc[[/note]], something more common in Europe than the US (unless you are in the military or working in a job that calls for using the 24-hour clock instead of the 12-hour clock, like an airline pilot or a foreign diplomat), but still uses "AM" and "PM" on top of that (which is only used for the 12-hour clock system that the US has). Other episodes that show time by the 24-hour clock instead of 12-hour include "The Laziest" (Larry's car radio), "The Uploads," (Richard's computer during his video game review has the time as 15:36 instead of 3:36pm), and "The Parking" (in the shot of Richard spraypainting a parking space, there's a placard in the parking garage showing the opening and closing times, with 24h [midnight] as the closing time).
** In "The Name", The Crocodile Woman refers to the fat under her arms as "bingo wings", which is more of a British term. Though it is used in American slang sometimes, the term "lunchlady arms" to describe fatty upper arms on a woman is used more often.
** A subtle one: in both "The Extras" (after Gary the Purple Moose attacks the shooting star host of ''Win or Don't Win'') and "The Lie" (when the Sluzzle Tag holiday special cuts off because the network could only make a few minutes of the show due to how lengthy animation is and how recent the holday is), a TV cuts to a colorful test card with a circle in the middle as a frowny face with X's for eyes. That card is actually based on [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Testcard#mediaviewer/File:PM5544_with_non-PAL_signals.png a real one]] used in the United Kingdom; the American equivalent is [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Testcard#mediaviewer/File:SMPTE_Color_Bars.svg the SMPTE color bars]].
** Another subtle example is how a weatherman in "The Law" says the temperature is 122 degrees Fahrenheit. This seems like a randomly specific number...unless you know that's exactly 50 degrees Celsius.
** In "The Pizza", during his goodbye phone call, Larry mentions a pizza special that cost "five dollars ninety-nine". In the U.S., $5.99 is usually said either as "five dollars and ninety-nine cents" or "five ninety-nine".
** In "The Butterfly," Karen is shown working at the Elmore "Emergency Call Cent'''re'''", instead of "Center".
** In "The Traitor," Alan tells Gumball and Darwin that he took his mom to the cinema before taking her to the hospital. "Cinema" is the British way of saying "the movies" or "the movie theater"; in American English, "cinema" is used as either an adjective to describe movies or a collective noun for a certain genre of films.
** When Richard is looking for something to fix the broken TV in "The Authority", he finds a coupon for TV repair. The phone number is shown as 0454 454 963 02, which is the UK/continental European format of writing telephone numbers rather than the American format.
** In "The Burden", Principal Brown tells Darwin and Gumball to "clear your diaries" when they need to take care of the school hamster. In "The Love", the black hexagon lady says she can't go on a date because "...my diary is full". Both are using the word "diary" to mean "a day planner/calendar", [[SeparatedByACommonLanguage a meaning that's used in the UK, but not the US]].
** Similar to the "centre/center" spelling difference in "The Butterfly", Gumball's subtitle in "The Misunderstandings" ("If you weren't such an anaemic chicken, you would defend her honor...") uses the British spelling of "anemic" (which actually uses the "ash" [æ] grapheme when spelled out) rather than the American spelling, which doesn't use this at all.
** In "The Ex", when Gumball is fiddling around with a cell phone while trying to help out his now-ex nemesis Rob, he says he was trying to take a picture but turned the torch (flashlight) on by mistake.
[[WeAllLiveInAmerica/TheAmazingWorldOfGumball Has its own page.]]
4th Mar '17 2:57:33 PM DRCEQ
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** In "The Ex", when Gumball is fiddling around with a cell phone while trying to help out his now-ex nemesis Rob, he says he was trying to take a picture but turned the torch (flashlight) on by mistake.
25th Feb '17 1:57:52 PM thatother1dude
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The series received a twenty-episode second season before the eighteen-episode first season even premiered, another twenty-episode third season shortly after the second season premiere, and two more twenty-episode seasons right before the third season premiere, bringing its total to 49 hours (a little over two days) worth of episodes. It got a "sneak peek" (i.e., the first of two episodes) in the UK on May 2nd, 2011, and in the US on May 3. On June 22nd, 2016, it was announced that the show was renewed for a sixth season. In September 2016, series creator Ben Bocquelet [[https://twitter.com/benbocquelet/status/773256731908530177 confirmed that the sixth season will be his last season]], but that [[https://twitter.com/benbocquelet/status/773572339883794434 this is not necessarily the end of the show]].

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The series received a twenty-episode second season before the eighteen-episode first season even premiered, another twenty-episode third season shortly after the second season premiere, and two more twenty-episode seasons right before the third season premiere, and the sixth season was extend by two episodes, bringing its total to 49 50 hours (a little over two days) worth of episodes. It got a "sneak peek" (i.e., the first of two episodes) in the UK on May 2nd, 2011, and in the US on May 3. On June 22nd, 2016, it was announced that the show was renewed for a sixth season. In September 2016, series creator Ben Bocquelet [[https://twitter.com/benbocquelet/status/773256731908530177 confirmed that the sixth season will be his last season]], but that [[https://twitter.com/benbocquelet/status/773572339883794434 this is not necessarily the end of the show]].
This list shows the last 10 events of 1182. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=WesternAnimation.TheAmazingWorldOfGumball