History WesternAnimation / TheAmazingWorldOFGumball

23rd Jun '16 6:51:08 PM ParkedCarAnne
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The series received a twenty-episode second season before the eighteen-episode first season even premiered, another twenty-episode third season shortly after the second season premiere, and two more twenty-episode seasons right before the third season premiere, bringing its total to 49 hours (a little over two days) worth of episodes. It got a "sneak peek" (i.e., the first of two episodes) in the UK on May 2nd, 2011, and in the US on May 3. The official US premiere was May 9 and the UK on September 5th. The show is currently in its 4th season and has been renewed up to season five, which will air, according to the creators, "sometime in 2017."

to:

The series received a twenty-episode second season before the eighteen-episode first season even premiered, another twenty-episode third season shortly after the second season premiere, and two more twenty-episode seasons right before the third season premiere, bringing its total to 49 hours (a little over two days) worth of episodes. It got a "sneak peek" (i.e., the first of two episodes) in the UK on May 2nd, 2011, and in the US on May 3. The official US premiere was May 9 and the UK on September 5th. The show is currently in its 4th season and has been renewed up to season five, which will air, according to the creators, "sometime in 2017."
" On June 22n, 2016, it was announced that the show was renewed for a sixth season.



* CrapsaccharineWorld: On the one hand, Elmore is a colorful world filled with cartoon characters animated in different styles where the impossible is possible. On the other hand, Elmore is pretty much an exaggerated take on 21st century American society, where the [[SuckySchool education system is a joke]], TheWorldIsAlwaysDoomed, crime is rampant and the PoliceAreUseless, everyone is addicted to the Internet and social media, and the [[JerkassBall jerkass]] and IdiotBall get tossed around with surprising frequency. The only differences between this and the real world is that ToonPhysics enhances all of these problems and there's a surprising amount of BlackComedyCannibalism (since most of the people in Elmore are based on food products, like Banana Joe, Sarah G. Lato, Anton the slice of toast, and the town's police force).

to:

* CrapsaccharineWorld: On the one hand, Elmore is a colorful world filled with cartoon characters animated in different styles where the impossible is possible. On the other hand, Elmore is pretty much an exaggerated take on 21st century American society, where the [[SuckySchool education system is a joke]], TheWorldIsAlwaysDoomed, TheWorldIsAlwaysDoomed (often because of The Wattersons' antics), crime is rampant freely committed by anyone and everyone and the PoliceAreUseless, everyone is addicted to the Internet and social media, and the [[JerkassBall jerkass]] and IdiotBall get tossed around with surprising frequency. The only differences between this and the real world is that ToonPhysics enhances all of these problems and there's a surprising amount of BlackComedyCannibalism (since most of the people in Elmore are based on food products, like Banana Joe, Sarah G. Lato, Anton the slice of toast, and the town's police force).



** Series director Mic Graves' name has been seen on everything from books and logos to TV appearances (cf. the talk show called ''The Jack Dingle Show'' that has the topic "Mic Graves Ate My Hamster").

to:

** Series director Mic Graves' name has been seen on everything from books and logos to TV appearances (cf. the "The Signal" where half of Gumball's face is cut off with a clip from a talk show called ''The Jack Dingle Show'' that has the topic "Mic Graves Ate My Hamster").



** "The Meddler", where Nicole accompanies Gumball to school.

to:

** "The Meddler", where Nicole accompanies Gumball to school.school and tries to interfere with his social life (urging him to tell Penny how he feels about her and stand up to Tina Rex).



* DenserAndWackier: As the animation improved (from season two to now), the plots went from being light and innocent to having more manic humor and being even less subdued.

to:

* DenserAndWackier: As the animation improved (from season two to now), the plots went from being light and innocent to having more manic manic, often dark, humor and being even less subdued.



* FamilyFriendlyFirearms: None of the police officers use guns, visibly lacking even holsters. Instead they always use [[StunGuns tasers]] they pull out of HammerSpace. The one criminal we always see uses a spoon [[FauxHorrific that is treated as if it were a deadly weapon]] by everyone but the police. The one time any kind of firearm is shown is during the "Make the Most of It" musical number in "The Kids": Gumball imagines himself as a cowboy holding a revolver, which sounds like a real gun, but the color and shape make it look like a toy.

to:

* FamilyFriendlyFirearms: None of the police officers use guns, visibly lacking even holsters. Instead they always use [[StunGuns tasers]] they pull out of HammerSpace. The one criminal we always see (Sal Left Thumb) uses a spoon [[FauxHorrific that is treated as if it were a deadly weapon]] by everyone but the police. The one time any kind of firearm is shown is during the "Make the Most of It" musical number in "The Kids": Gumball imagines himself as a cowboy holding a revolver, which sounds like a real gun, but the color and shape make it look like a toy.



** TheBigGuy: Richard(type two-dumb, cowardly, and harmless)

to:

** TheBigGuy: Richard(type two-dumb, Richard (Type 2: dumb, cowardly, and harmless)harmless, though Richard in some episodes can be resourceful and scheming)



* GenreRoulette: The show's default genre is "[[MagicalRealism magically realistic]] family/kids sitcom"[[note]](with the "com" part either being situation comedy, buddy comedy, SurrealHumor, ''Simpsons''-esque satire, BlackComedy, CringeComedy, or any combination of the six)[[/note]], but since season two, a lot of episodes tend to dip into other genres (whether played straight or parodied). Some examples include sketch comedy ("The Tape"), [[RandomEventsPlot vignettes and character sketches]] ("The World", "The Extras", "The Butterfly", "The Love", and "The Night"), coming of age ("The Shell" and "The Kids"), hero's quest ("The Quest", "The Romantic," and "The Routine"), prison drama ("The Lesson"), 1980s teen sports ("The Sweaters"), teen drama ("The Others"), paranormal ("The Ghost," "The Oracle," "The Flower", and "The Scam"), zombie apocalypse ("The Joy"), horror ("Halloween," "The Vacation", "The Mirror", and "The Nest"), science fiction ("The Countdown", "The Dream"), post-apocalyptic adventure ("The Pizza"), mystery ("The Mystery," "The Treasure", and the first half of "The Traitor"), cosmic/surreal horror ("The Job", "The Void," "The Nobody", and "The Signal"), existentialist ("The Question"), family drama ("The Hero," "The Man", and "The Signature"), high-octane action ("The Bus", "The Return", "The Password", the climax of "The Parking", and "The Ape") and medical drama (the second half of "The Traitor").

to:

* GenreRoulette: The show's default genre is "[[MagicalRealism magically realistic]] family/kids sitcom"[[note]](with the "com" part either being situation comedy, buddy comedy, SurrealHumor, gross-out humor, ''Simpsons''-esque satire, BlackComedy, CringeComedy, or any combination of the six)[[/note]], seven)[[/note]], but since season two, a lot of episodes tend to dip into other genres (whether played straight or parodied). Some examples include sketch comedy ("The Tape"), [[RandomEventsPlot vignettes and character sketches]] ("The World", "The Extras", "The Butterfly", "The Love", and "The Night"), coming of age ("The Shell" and "The Kids"), hero's quest ("The Quest", "The Romantic," and "The Routine"), prison drama ("The Lesson"), 1980s teen sports ("The Sweaters"), teen drama ("The Others"), paranormal ("The Ghost," "The Oracle," "The Flower", and "The Scam"), zombie apocalypse ("The Joy"), horror ("Halloween," "The Vacation", "The Mirror", and "The Nest"), science fiction ("The Countdown", "The Dream"), post-apocalyptic adventure ("The Pizza"), mystery ("The Mystery," "The Treasure", and the first half of "The Traitor"), cosmic/surreal horror ("The Job", "The Void," "The Nobody", and "The Signal"), existentialist ("The Question"), family drama ("The Hero," "The Man", and "The Signature"), high-octane action ("The Bus", "The Return", "The Password", the climax of "The Parking", and "The Ape") and medical drama (the second half of "The Traitor").
22nd Jun '16 5:06:49 AM Adept
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* ToonPhysics: ''Very'' prevalent, possibly one of the biggest users of this trope next to the Fleischer Studios shorts, TexAvery's MGM shorts, and BobClampett's work at Warner Bros. Due of the show's mixing of different animation styles, nearly every device of cartoon physics imaginable is played with and/or lampshaded.

to:

* ToonPhysics: ''Very'' prevalent, possibly one of the biggest users of this trope next to the Fleischer Studios shorts, TexAvery's MGM shorts, and BobClampett's Creator/BobClampett's work at Warner Bros. Due of the show's mixing of different animation styles, nearly every device of cartoon physics imaginable is played with and/or lampshaded.
20th Jun '16 10:31:54 PM KamenRiderOokalf
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-->-- Creator '''Ben Bocquelet''
Created by Ben Bocquelet, the series is the first commission from Turner Broadcasting's Creator/CartoonNetwork Development Studio Europe. Combining a mixture of several animation techniques with live-action backgrounds, the series follows the misadventures of a hapless twelve year old cat named Gumball, who lives in the quaint little town of Elmore - where [[EverythingTalks nearly everything has the power to come to life]]! Joining him is his best friend Darwin, the one-time pet fish who grew legs and joined the family. The two of them go to Elmore Junior High where all sorts of strange characters roam the halls.

to:

-->-- Creator '''Ben Bocquelet''
Bocquelet'''

Created by Ben Bocquelet, the series is the first commission from Turner Broadcasting's Creator/CartoonNetwork Development Studio Europe. Combining a mixture of several animation techniques with live-action backgrounds, the series follows the misadventures of a hapless twelve year old cat named Gumball, who lives in the quaint little town of Elmore - where [[EverythingTalks nearly everything has the power to come to life]]! Joining him is his best friend Darwin, the one-time pet fish who grew legs and joined the family. The two of them go to Elmore Junior High where all sorts of strange characters roam the halls.
16th Jun '16 11:09:02 AM DreadedDuck500
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Added DiffLines:

** As of Season 4, "kill" has become slightly more common but only in contexts such as killing a virtual snake creature in what Richard believes to be a video game ("The Uploads"), killing someone's appetite ("The Origins"), or as part of the saying "What doesn't kill you makes you stronger" in a song ("The Advice"). The use of the word in a direct reference to the act of killing someone has thus far been avoided.
15th Jun '16 12:14:31 PM ParkedCarAnne
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* GenreRoulette: The show's default genre is "[[MagicalRealism magically realistic]] family/kids sitcom"[[note]](with the "com" part either being situation comedy, buddy comedy, ''Simpsons''-esque satire, BlackComedy, and/or CringeComedy)[[/note]], but since season two, a lot of episodes tend to dip into other genres (whether played straight or parodied). Some examples include sketch comedy ("The Tape"), [[RandomEventsPlot vignettes and character sketches]] ("The World", "The Extras", "The Butterfly", "The Love", and "The Night"), coming of age ("The Shell" and "The Kids"), hero's quest ("The Quest", "The Romantic," and "The Routine"), prison drama ("The Lesson"), 1980s teen sports ("The Sweaters"), teen drama ("The Others"), paranormal ("The Ghost," "The Oracle," "The Flower", and "The Scam"), zombie apocalypse ("The Joy"), horror ("Halloween," "The Vacation", "The Mirror", and "The Nest"), science fiction ("The Countdown", "The Dream"), post-apocalyptic adventure ("The Pizza"), mystery ("The Mystery," "The Treasure", and the first half of "The Traitor"), cosmic/surreal horror ("The Job", "The Void," "The Nobody", and "The Signal"), existentialist ("The Question"), family drama ("The Hero," "The Man", and "The Signature"), high-octane action ("The Bus", "The Return", "The Password", and "The Ape") and medical drama (the second half of "The Traitor").

to:

* GenreRoulette: The show's default genre is "[[MagicalRealism magically realistic]] family/kids sitcom"[[note]](with the "com" part either being situation comedy, buddy comedy, SurrealHumor, ''Simpsons''-esque satire, BlackComedy, and/or CringeComedy)[[/note]], CringeComedy, or any combination of the six)[[/note]], but since season two, a lot of episodes tend to dip into other genres (whether played straight or parodied). Some examples include sketch comedy ("The Tape"), [[RandomEventsPlot vignettes and character sketches]] ("The World", "The Extras", "The Butterfly", "The Love", and "The Night"), coming of age ("The Shell" and "The Kids"), hero's quest ("The Quest", "The Romantic," and "The Routine"), prison drama ("The Lesson"), 1980s teen sports ("The Sweaters"), teen drama ("The Others"), paranormal ("The Ghost," "The Oracle," "The Flower", and "The Scam"), zombie apocalypse ("The Joy"), horror ("Halloween," "The Vacation", "The Mirror", and "The Nest"), science fiction ("The Countdown", "The Dream"), post-apocalyptic adventure ("The Pizza"), mystery ("The Mystery," "The Treasure", and the first half of "The Traitor"), cosmic/surreal horror ("The Job", "The Void," "The Nobody", and "The Signal"), existentialist ("The Question"), family drama ("The Hero," "The Man", and "The Signature"), high-octane action ("The Bus", "The Return", "The Password", the climax of "The Parking", and "The Ape") and medical drama (the second half of "The Traitor").



** Rocky does any school job that's not a teacher or an administrative figure, like the janitor/groundskeeper (the most frequently-shown), the bus driver (second most frequent), the lost and found clerk ([[OneEpisodeWonder one episode only]], or a cafeteria worker (third most frequent).

to:

** Rocky does any school job that's not a teacher or an administrative figure, like the janitor/groundskeeper (the most frequently-shown), the bus driver (second most frequent), the lost and found clerk ([[OneEpisodeWonder one episode only]], only]]), or a cafeteria worker (third most frequent).



** Characters smashing through the school's windows is a common occurrence throughout the series, happening in "The Mystery", "The Sock" and "The Bet". The Australian airings almost always edits out any of these scenes to avoid [[DontTryThisAtHome copycat incidents]].

to:

** Characters smashing through the school's windows is a common occurrence throughout the series, happening in "The Mystery", "The Sock" and "The Bet". The Australian and Asian airings almost always edits out any of these scenes to avoid [[DontTryThisAtHome copycat incidents]].



* SlapstickKnowsNoGender: Gradually comes into effect over the course of the series. Early on, the physical comedy was far more often toward the male cast, with Nicole and Ms. Simian being the occasional exception. Around the second season, slapstick becomes more likely to be applied to anyone. Sarah and Teri seem especially prone to this- within the first couple episodes of season three, both have been maimed, melted, burned, and/or partially eaten.

to:

* SlapstickKnowsNoGender: Gradually comes into effect over the course of the series. Early on, the physical comedy was far more often toward the male cast, with Nicole and Ms. Simian being the occasional exception. Around the second season, slapstick becomes more likely to be applied to anyone.anyone regardless of gender. Sarah and Teri seem especially prone to this- within the first couple episodes of season three, both have been maimed, melted, burned, and/or partially eaten.



** Surprisingly averted as of [[WhamEpisode "The Shell"]] involving [[spoiler:Penny's true form and she and Gumball becoming official.]]
* SurrealHumor

to:

** Surprisingly averted as of [[WhamEpisode "The Shell"]] involving [[spoiler:Penny's true form and she and Gumball becoming official.]]
official]] and in "The Kids" when Gumball and Darwin get new voices (though this is justified as the entire episode is a farewell to the original voice actors for Gumball and Darwin [Logan Grove and Kwesi Boakye] and an intro to the new ones [Jacob Hopkins and Terrell Ransom, Jr]).
* SurrealHumorSurrealHumor: Comes part and parcel with a series that celebrates, parodies, and deconstructs ToonPhysics and every animation and entertainment trope under the sun.
15th Jun '16 8:25:08 AM ParkedCarAnne
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* CrapsaccharineWorld: On the one hand, Elmore is a colorful world filled with cartoon characters animated in different styles where the impossible is possible. On the other hand, there are a lot of things wrong with living a world like this:
** Because EverythingTalks, [[LetsMeetTheMeat all food is sentient]]. If Gumball's lunch in "The World" is anything to go by, people do not care whether or not their food wants to be eaten (see also the scene of Gumball as Zach eating Banana Joe's cousin, who's an apple, in "The Name"). Likewise, anthropomorphic non-humans eating each other, while clearly considered equivalent to cannibalism, [[BlackComedyCannibalism comes up surprisingly often]].
** Society and the world itself [[TheWorldIsAlwaysDoomed seems constantly on the edge of disaster]]: A lot of the students at Elmore Junior High basically have superpowers that can cause all sorts of destruction, including a giant who will destroy the whole ''town'' if he expresses emotion of any kind, a shapeshifter who turns into monsters whenever she's distressed, angry, or feels bad about how she looks, and a cloud that causes storms whenever she gets jealous. "The Game" shows that a board game (Dodj or Daar) has the power to bend time and space, and force it's players to obey the rules. "The Pizza" reveals that one person is in charge of working almost every job in Elmore and, without him, the town's economy plunges and Elmore turns into a post-apocalyptic warzone. In "The Job", it turns out one person doing something very unexpected of him (namely, Richard getting a job and actually doing it well) can ''destroy the entire universe.'' "The Butterfly" shows that even something simple as ''a butterfly'' can cause havoc and destruction in Elmore, "The Safety" shows that Darwin can get away with turning the entire town into a dictatorship just because he's so cute. "The Money" shows that the Wattersons' family budget [[spoiler:is keeping Elmore from losing their animation quality]]. "The Wicked" shows that Margaret Robinson freely commits crimes around town (stealing, vandalism, assault, mail tampering, arson, grand theft auto, criminal mischief, and destruction of property just to name a few) and the police are too stupid to stop her.
** In "The Genius", the government is willing and able to take children who are especially smart away from their families for testing, and no one else seems to care.
** "The Gripes" and "The Finale" show that Elmore's residents can be callous and quick to [[TorchesAndPitchforks violent anger]], especially if the Wattersons do anything to upset them.
** In "The Boss", it turns out at least one major corporation is run by ''demons'' who own their employees' souls and keep them working 24/7 for the entire lives. Not even a change in management stopped this.
** "The Void" show that [[spoiler:the universe is sentient]] and can get rid of anything and anyone it considers a "mistake," from embarrassing fads (jorts, the mullet, and disco) to historical disasters (the sinking of the ''R.M.S. Titantic'' and The Hindenberg) to background characters ([[spoiler:Molly the sauropod and Rob the cyclops]]).
* CreatorCameo:

to:

* CrapsaccharineWorld: On the one hand, Elmore is a colorful world filled with cartoon characters animated in different styles where the impossible is possible. On the other hand, there are a lot of things wrong with living a world like this:
** Because EverythingTalks, [[LetsMeetTheMeat all food
Elmore is sentient]]. If Gumball's lunch in "The World" is anything to go by, people do not care whether or not their food wants to be eaten (see also pretty much an exaggerated take on 21st century American society, where the scene of Gumball as Zach eating Banana Joe's cousin, who's an apple, in "The Name"). Likewise, anthropomorphic non-humans eating each other, while clearly considered equivalent to cannibalism, [[BlackComedyCannibalism comes up surprisingly often]].
** Society
[[SuckySchool education system is a joke]], TheWorldIsAlwaysDoomed, crime is rampant and the PoliceAreUseless, everyone is addicted to the Internet and social media, and the [[JerkassBall jerkass]] and IdiotBall get tossed around with surprising frequency. The only differences between this and the real world itself [[TheWorldIsAlwaysDoomed seems constantly on the edge is that ToonPhysics enhances all of disaster]]: A lot these problems and there's a surprising amount of BlackComedyCannibalism (since most of the students at Elmore Junior High basically have superpowers that can cause all sorts of destruction, including a giant who will destroy the whole ''town'' if he expresses emotion of any kind, a shapeshifter who turns into monsters whenever she's distressed, angry, or feels bad about how she looks, and a cloud that causes storms whenever she gets jealous. "The Game" shows that a board game (Dodj or Daar) has the power to bend time and space, and force it's players to obey the rules. "The Pizza" reveals that one person is in charge of working almost every job people in Elmore and, without him, are based on food products, like Banana Joe, Sarah G. Lato, Anton the slice of toast, and the town's economy plunges and Elmore turns into a post-apocalyptic warzone. In "The Job", it turns out one person doing something very unexpected of him (namely, Richard getting a job and actually doing it well) can ''destroy the entire universe.'' "The Butterfly" shows that even something simple as ''a butterfly'' can cause havoc and destruction in Elmore, "The Safety" shows that Darwin can get away with turning the entire town into a dictatorship just because he's so cute. "The Money" shows that the Wattersons' family budget [[spoiler:is keeping Elmore from losing their animation quality]]. "The Wicked" shows that Margaret Robinson freely commits crimes around town (stealing, vandalism, assault, mail tampering, arson, grand theft auto, criminal mischief, and destruction of property just to name a few) and the police are too stupid to stop her.
** In "The Genius", the government is willing and able to take children who are especially smart away from their families for testing, and no one else seems to care.
** "The Gripes" and "The Finale" show that Elmore's residents can be callous and quick to [[TorchesAndPitchforks violent anger]], especially if the Wattersons do anything to upset them.
** In "The Boss", it turns out at least one major corporation is run by ''demons'' who own their employees' souls and keep them working 24/7 for the entire lives. Not even a change in management stopped this.
** "The Void" show that [[spoiler:the universe is sentient]] and can get rid of anything and anyone it considers a "mistake," from embarrassing fads (jorts, the mullet, and disco) to historical disasters (the sinking of the ''R.M.S. Titantic'' and The Hindenberg) to background characters ([[spoiler:Molly the sauropod and Rob the cyclops]]).
* CreatorCameo:
force).
*CreatorCameo



** Book props throughout the show tend to list the author as Mic Graves, the series director.

to:

** Book props throughout Series director Mic Graves' name has been seen on everything from books and logos to TV appearances (cf. the talk show tend to list called ''The Jack Dingle Show'' that has the author as Mic Graves, the series director.topic "Mic Graves Ate My Hamster").



** "The Dress", where Gumball has to wear a dress to school, causing Darwin to have an awkward crush on Gumball's female alter ego.

to:

** "The Dress", where Gumball has to wear a Nicole's wedding dress to school, causing Darwin to have an awkward crush on Gumball's female alter ego.



* DenserAndWackier: As the animation got better the plots went from being light and innocent to having more manic humor being even less subdued.

to:

* DenserAndWackier: As the animation got better improved (from season two to now), the plots went from being light and innocent to having more manic humor and being even less subdued.
11th Jun '16 9:29:30 PM gumballclarence
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Added DiffLines:

* FiveManBand: The Wattersons
** TheHero: Gumball
** TheLancer: Darwin
** TheSmartGuy: Anais
** TheBigGuy: Richard(type two-dumb, cowardly, and harmless)
** TheChick: Nicole (on her better days...)


Added DiffLines:

* GagSeries


Added DiffLines:

* SurrealHumor
11th Jun '16 9:10:24 AM ParkedCarAnne
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**In "The Lie", Anais thinks Valentine's Day is a fake holiday.



* GenreRoulette: The show's default genre is "[[MagicalRealism magically realistic]] family/kids sitcom"[[note]](with the "com" part either being situation comedy, buddy comedy, ''Simpsons''-esque satire, BlackComedy, and/or CringeComedy)[[/note]], but since season two, a lot of episodes tend to dip into other genres (whether played straight or parodied). Some examples include sketch comedy ("The Tape"), [[RandomEventsPlot vignettes and character sketches]] ("The World", "The Extras", "The Butterfly", and "The Love"), coming of age ("The Shell" and "The Kids"), hero's quest ("The Quest", "The Romantic," and "The Routine"), prison drama ("The Lesson"), 1980s teen sports ("The Sweaters"), teen drama ("The Others"), paranormal ("The Ghost," "The Oracle," and "The Flower"), zombie apocalypse ("The Joy"), horror ("Halloween," "The Vacation", and "The Mirror"), science fiction ("The Countdown", "The Dream"), post-apocalyptic adventure ("The Pizza"), mystery ("The Mystery," "The Treasure", and the first half of "The Traitor"), cosmic/surreal horror ("The Job", "The Void," "The Nobody", and "The Signal"), existentialist ("The Question"), family drama ("The Hero," "The Man", and "The Signature"), and medical drama (the second half of "The Traitor").

to:

* GenreRoulette: The show's default genre is "[[MagicalRealism magically realistic]] family/kids sitcom"[[note]](with the "com" part either being situation comedy, buddy comedy, ''Simpsons''-esque satire, BlackComedy, and/or CringeComedy)[[/note]], but since season two, a lot of episodes tend to dip into other genres (whether played straight or parodied). Some examples include sketch comedy ("The Tape"), [[RandomEventsPlot vignettes and character sketches]] ("The World", "The Extras", "The Butterfly", "The Love", and "The Love"), Night"), coming of age ("The Shell" and "The Kids"), hero's quest ("The Quest", "The Romantic," and "The Routine"), prison drama ("The Lesson"), 1980s teen sports ("The Sweaters"), teen drama ("The Others"), paranormal ("The Ghost," "The Oracle," "The Flower", and "The Flower"), Scam"), zombie apocalypse ("The Joy"), horror ("Halloween," "The Vacation", "The Mirror", and "The Mirror"), Nest"), science fiction ("The Countdown", "The Dream"), post-apocalyptic adventure ("The Pizza"), mystery ("The Mystery," "The Treasure", and the first half of "The Traitor"), cosmic/surreal horror ("The Job", "The Void," "The Nobody", and "The Signal"), existentialist ("The Question"), family drama ("The Hero," "The Man", and "The Signature"), high-octane action ("The Bus", "The Return", "The Password", and "The Ape") and medical drama (the second half of "The Traitor").



* IdiosyncraticEpisodeNaming: Every episode title is "[[TheTheTitle The [noun]]]", except the holiday specials ("Christmas" and "Halloween").

to:

* IdiosyncraticEpisodeNaming: Every episode title is "[[TheTheTitle The [noun]]]", except the holiday specials ("Christmas" and "Halloween")."Halloween" and the first episode "The Responsible", though that was an error that has long since been fixed).



** Rocky does any school job that's not a teacher or an administrative figure, like the janitor/groundskeeper (the most frequently-shown), the bus driver, the lost and found clerk, or a cafeteria worker.

to:

** Rocky does any school job that's not a teacher or an administrative figure, like the janitor/groundskeeper (the most frequently-shown), the bus driver, driver (second most frequent), the lost and found clerk, clerk ([[OneEpisodeWonder one episode only]], or a cafeteria worker.worker (third most frequent).



* NonstandardCharacterDesign: While most characters are drawn with a flat, stylized look, there are also quite a few that run the gamut from paper cutouts to photo-realistic dinosaurs, CGI cubes, Muppet-style puppets, and live-action chin puppets.

to:

* NonstandardCharacterDesign: While most characters are drawn with a flat, 2D, stylized look, there are also quite a few that run the gamut from paper cutouts to photo-realistic dinosaurs, CGI cubes, Muppet-style puppets, and live-action chin puppets.



** Various doors and signs are labelled "W.C." for "water closet", a term for "bathroom" or "(a room with a) toilet" that isn't typically used in the U.S.. Gumball's {{emoticon}}-based chat with Penny in "The Romantic" has a "W.C." placard used to mean "bathroom".

to:

** Various doors and signs are labelled "W.C." for "water closet", a term for "bathroom" or "(a room with a) toilet" that isn't typically used in the U.S.. Gumball's {{emoticon}}-based chat with Penny in "The Romantic" has a "W.C." placard used to mean "bathroom"."bathroom" and whenever there's a scene in the mall, there's a placard showing directions to the "W.C" rather than the men's/women's bathroom.



** When Richard is looking for something to fix the broken TV in "The Authority", he finds a coupon for TV repair. The coupon's phone number is 0454 454 963 02, which is the UK format of writing telephone numbers rather than the American format.

to:

** When Richard is looking for something to fix the broken TV in "The Authority", he finds a coupon for TV repair. The coupon's phone number is shown as 0454 454 963 02, which is the UK UK/continental European format of writing telephone numbers rather than the American format.
7th Jun '16 9:02:55 AM Rupa
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* ImpossibleShadowPuppets: [[spoiler: Billy]] performs these near the end of the episode ''The Pest'' to explain why he was bullying Anais.

to:

* ImpossibleShadowPuppets: [[spoiler: Billy]] performs these near the end of the episode ''The Pest'' "The Pest" to explain why he was bullying Anais.
7th Jun '16 9:00:59 AM Rupa
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* ImpossibleHandPuppets: [[spoiler: Billy]] performs these near the end of the episode ''The Pest'' to explain why he was bullying Anais.

to:

* ImpossibleHandPuppets: ImpossibleShadowPuppets: [[spoiler: Billy]] performs these near the end of the episode ''The Pest'' to explain why he was bullying Anais.
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