History WesternAnimation / OneFroggyEvening

21st Sep '17 6:27:21 AM fruitstripegum
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* {{Bowdlerise}}: When this cartoon aired on ABC's ''The Bugs Bunny and Tweety'' show and any installment show on the former WB network, the part where the man paints a "Free Beer" sign to get people to come in and see the frog was edited to make it look like the crowd came in because he hung a "Free Admission" sign. Unlike most Looney Tunes gags that have been affected by censorship when aired on TV, this doesn't really alter it for better or worse, as both responses (coming in because of free beer and coming in because there's a free show) are believable. On the other hand, there ''is'' a bit of an obvious audio skip, meaning that something was cut.



* {{Bowdlerise}}: When this cartoon aired on ABC's ''The Bugs Bunny and Tweety'' show and any installment show on the former WB network, the part where the man paints a "Free Beer" sign to get people to come in and see the frog was edited to make it look like the crowd came in because he hung a "Free Admission" sign. Unlike most Looney Tunes gags that have been affected by censorship when aired on TV, this doesn't really alter it for better or worse, as both responses (coming in because of free beer and coming in because there's a free show) are believable. On the other hand, there ''is'' a bit of an obvious audio skip, meaning that something was cut.



* MimeAndMusicOnlyCartoon: One of the few in the 50s.



* MimeAndMusicOnlyCartoon: One of the few in the 50s.
24th Apr '17 6:26:04 AM MagBas
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** The song itself is an interesting example of dissonance. The song as originally written as sung by the man, tells the story of a woman. As it's a sad lullaby about her finding a little girl that reminds her of her own dead child. The part Michigan sings is the chorus that is preceded in the song by making it clear it is the female's words. When sung by a male, the song can now have UnfortunateImplications.

to:

** The song itself is an interesting example of dissonance. The song as originally written as sung by the man, tells the story of a woman. As it's a sad lullaby about her finding a little girl that reminds her of her own dead child. The part Michigan sings is the chorus that is preceded in the song by making it clear it is the female's words. When sung by a male, the song can now have UnfortunateImplications.
19th Nov '16 11:21:28 AM BatmanKalEl
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* EarWorm: "Hello mah baby hello mah honey, hello mah ragtime gaaaal..."
** The fascinating thing about that song was that, while it sounded quaint and old-fashioned even in the year the cartoon was released, it was about a ''new, high tech'' society that allowed for real-time long-distance relationships. Calling his honey a "Ragtime" gal meant she was ultra-modern; "Send me a kiss by wire" was not that far removed from the chatroom flirtation of today; and "Telephone and tell me I'm your own!" was about using a new high-tech gadget to get your message across.
28th Oct '16 7:11:49 PM ANTMuddle
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* AnAesop: The short reminds people to enjoy the good things, and not try to profit on them.

to:

* AnAesop: The short reminds people to enjoy the good things, and not try to profit on them.them otherwise.



* MimeAndMusicOnlyCartoon: One of the few ones in the 50s.

to:

* MimeAndMusicOnlyCartoon: One of the few ones in the 50s.
6th Oct '16 8:57:26 PM Angeldeb82
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* {{Bowdlerization}}: When this cartoon aired on ABC's ''The Bugs Bunny and Tweety'' show and any installment show on the former WB network, the part where the man paints a "Free Beer" sign to get people to come in and see the frog was edited to make it look like the crowd came in because he hung a "Free Admission" sign. Unlike most Looney Tunes gags that have been affected by censorship when aired on TV, this doesn't really alter it for better or worse, as both responses (coming in because of free beer and coming in because there's a free show) are believable. On the other hand, there ''is'' a bit of an obvious audio skip, meaning that something was cut.

to:

* {{Bowdlerization}}: {{Bowdlerise}}: When this cartoon aired on ABC's ''The Bugs Bunny and Tweety'' show and any installment show on the former WB network, the part where the man paints a "Free Beer" sign to get people to come in and see the frog was edited to make it look like the crowd came in because he hung a "Free Admission" sign. Unlike most Looney Tunes gags that have been affected by censorship when aired on TV, this doesn't really alter it for better or worse, as both responses (coming in because of free beer and coming in because there's a free show) are believable. On the other hand, there ''is'' a bit of an obvious audio skip, meaning that something was cut.



* {{Earworm}}: "Hello mah baby hello mah honey, hello mah ragtime gaaaal..."

to:

* {{Earworm}}: EarWorm: "Hello mah baby hello mah honey, hello mah ragtime gaaaal..."
7th Feb '16 3:25:41 PM nombretomado
Is there an issue? Send a Message


Referred to by Creator/StevenSpielberg as "the ''Film/CitizenKane'' of animated film", this [[TheGoldenAgeOfAnimation 1955]] Creator/ChuckJones ''[[WesternAnimation/LooneyTunes Merrie Melodies]]'' short featured none of the regular Creator/WarnerBros stable, instead telling a standalone story about a construction worker who discovers a live frog inside the cornerstone of a building he's helping to demolish. To his amazement, the frog pulls out a little top hat and cane and starts to sing and dance. The construction worker naturally expects to strike it rich from his discovery. Unfortunately, the frog [[NotSoImaginaryFriend refuses to perform in front of anybody else]]. At the end, after becoming destitute and homeless, the man puts the frog into the cornerstone of a new building, and a flash forward reveals that a man of the future will soon suffer the same fate.

to:

Referred to by Creator/StevenSpielberg as "the ''Film/CitizenKane'' of animated film", this [[TheGoldenAgeOfAnimation [[UsefulNotes/TheGoldenAgeOfAnimation 1955]] Creator/ChuckJones ''[[WesternAnimation/LooneyTunes Merrie Melodies]]'' short featured none of the regular Creator/WarnerBros stable, instead telling a standalone story about a construction worker who discovers a live frog inside the cornerstone of a building he's helping to demolish. To his amazement, the frog pulls out a little top hat and cane and starts to sing and dance. The construction worker naturally expects to strike it rich from his discovery. Unfortunately, the frog [[NotSoImaginaryFriend refuses to perform in front of anybody else]]. At the end, after becoming destitute and homeless, the man puts the frog into the cornerstone of a new building, and a flash forward reveals that a man of the future will soon suffer the same fate.
30th Jan '16 8:09:19 PM Homemaderat
Is there an issue? Send a Message


** The song itself is an interesting example of dissonance. While written by men, the intended singer/speaker of the song was a female. Who is singing a sad lullaby about seeing a little girl in the park that reminds her of her own dead daughter. Over time though it seems to have been covered more often by men. Given the change of gender and tone the song underwent by the time it got to this short, there's a whole lot of implications that weren't ever intended.

to:

** The song itself is an interesting example of dissonance. While The song as originally written as sung by men, the intended singer/speaker of man, tells the song was story of a female. Who is singing woman. As it's a sad lullaby about seeing her finding a little girl in the park that reminds her of her own dead daughter. Over time though it seems to have been covered more often by men. Given child. The part Michigan sings is the change of gender and tone chorus that is preceded in the song underwent by making it clear it is the time it got to this short, there's female's words. When sung by a whole lot of implications that weren't ever intended.male, the song can now have UnfortunateImplications.
30th Jan '16 8:02:54 PM Homemaderat
Is there an issue? Send a Message

Added DiffLines:

** The song itself is an interesting example of dissonance. While written by men, the intended singer/speaker of the song was a female. Who is singing a sad lullaby about seeing a little girl in the park that reminds her of her own dead daughter. Over time though it seems to have been covered more often by men. Given the change of gender and tone the song underwent by the time it got to this short, there's a whole lot of implications that weren't ever intended.
5th Jan '16 7:45:45 PM Psi001
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* EarnYourHappyEnding: "Another Froggy Evening" gives one to the frog. He finally meets someone who has no intention of exploiting him and just wants to hear him sing. They even sing together, as the short ends. The person in question? [[spoiler:Marvin the Martian.]]

to:

* EarnYourHappyEnding: "Another Froggy Evening" gives one to the frog. He finally meets someone who not only understands his language but has no intention of exploiting him and just wants to hear him sing. They even sing together, as the short ends. The person in question? [[spoiler:Marvin the Martian.]]



* NoDialogueEpisode: While Michigan J. Frog does sing, the characters never communicate through dialogue the audience can hear—only signs, gestures, and cartoon violence.

to:

* NoDialogueEpisode: While Michigan J. Frog does sing, the characters never communicate through dialogue the audience can hear—only signs, gestures, and cartoon violence. "Another Froggy Evening" has a small conversation at the end, that works as something of TheReveal.
5th Jan '16 7:42:40 PM Psi001
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* KarmicTrickster: Michigan J. Frog.

to:

* KarmicTrickster: Michigan J. Frog. Maybe. [[FlatCharacter He's not a clear character.]]
This list shows the last 10 events of 46. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=WesternAnimation.OneFroggyEvening