History WesternAnimation / DoubleDragon

18th Jul '17 6:54:42 PM Saurubiker
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* AdaptationDyeJob: The Lee brothers are given the different hair colors and hair styles they had in ''Super Double Dragon'' (which in turn were based on the designs they had in the NES versions of the games), but Billy's hair is colored black like on the game's American boxart instead of the reddish brown hair he has in-game and Japanese promo art, which ends up making him look a poor man's [[Manga/FistOfTheNorthStar Kenshiro]] with the ensemble he's given. A coloring mistake in the episode "The Price of Oblivion" ended up inadvertently giving the Lee brothers their arcade colors for one scene, with the dark-haired brother (Billy in this case) being given a red outfit, while the blond-haired brother (Jimmy) being given the blue outfit.

to:

* AdaptationDyeJob: The Lee brothers are given the different hair colors and hair styles they had in ''Super Double Dragon'' (which in turn were based on the designs they had in the NES versions of the games), original trilogy), but Billy's hair is colored black like on the game's American boxart instead of the reddish brown hair he has in-game and Japanese promo art, which ends up making him look like a poor man's [[Manga/FistOfTheNorthStar Kenshiro]] with the ensemble he's given. A coloring mistake in the episode "The Price of Oblivion" ended up inadvertently giving the Lee brothers their arcade colors for one scene, with the dark-haired brother (Billy in this case) being given a red outfit, while the blond-haired brother (Jimmy) being given the blue outfit.
18th Jul '17 11:57:30 AM Saurubiker
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* AdaptationDyeJob: The Lee brothers are given the different hair colors and hair styles they had in the NES versions of the games, but Billy's hair is colored black instead of the reddish brown hair he had in the games in order to more closely resemble how Billy looked on the American boxart for ''Super Double Dragon'', which ends up making him look a poor man's version of [[Manga/FistOfTheNorthStar Kenshiro]]. A coloring mistake in the episode "The Price of Oblivion" ended up inadvertently giving the Lee brothers their arcade colors for one scene, with the dark-haired brother (Billy in this case) being given a red outfit, while the blond-haired brother (Jimmy) being given the blue outfit.

to:

* AdaptationDyeJob: The Lee brothers are given the different hair colors and hair styles they had in ''Super Double Dragon'' (which in turn were based on the designs they had in the NES versions of the games, games), but Billy's hair is colored black like on the game's American boxart instead of the reddish brown hair he had in the games in order to more closely resemble how Billy looked on the American boxart for ''Super Double Dragon'', has in-game and Japanese promo art, which ends up making him look a poor man's version of [[Manga/FistOfTheNorthStar Kenshiro]].Kenshiro]] with the ensemble he's given. A coloring mistake in the episode "The Price of Oblivion" ended up inadvertently giving the Lee brothers their arcade colors for one scene, with the dark-haired brother (Billy in this case) being given a red outfit, while the blond-haired brother (Jimmy) being given the blue outfit.
18th Jul '17 11:44:02 AM Saurubiker
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Added DiffLines:

* AdaptationDyeJob: The Lee brothers are given the different hair colors and hair styles they had in the NES versions of the games, but Billy's hair is colored black instead of the reddish brown hair he had in the games in order to more closely resemble how Billy looked on the American boxart for ''Super Double Dragon'', which ends up making him look a poor man's version of [[Manga/FistOfTheNorthStar Kenshiro]]. A coloring mistake in the episode "The Price of Oblivion" ended up inadvertently giving the Lee brothers their arcade colors for one scene, with the dark-haired brother (Billy in this case) being given a red outfit, while the blond-haired brother (Jimmy) being given the blue outfit.
18th Jul '17 11:28:41 AM Saurubiker
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** The Season 1 [=PSAs=] were pretty generic in nature, being nothing more than scenes from the actual show that were clearly redubbed at the last minute to shoehorn a lesson in order to meet the education content quota required for children programming at the time. There were only six [=PSAs] made for the first season, so the show reuses them all for the latter half of the season.

to:

** The Season 1 [=PSAs=] were pretty generic in nature, being nothing more than scenes from the actual show that were clearly redubbed at the last minute to shoehorn a lesson in order to meet the education content quota required for children programming at the time. There were only six [=PSAs] [=PSAs=] made for the first season, so the show reuses them all for the latter half of the season.
18th Jul '17 11:27:57 AM Saurubiker
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* AndKnowingIsHalfTheBattle - Every episode, except for the pilot, ended with a public service announcement featuring the heroes teaching some kind of moral to kids, as was standard with most animated shows at the time. The Season 1 [=PSAs=] were pretty generic in nature, being nothing more than redubbed scenes from the actual show and recycled for half the season. The Season 2 [=PSAs=] on the other hand were unique to each episode and had morals that were actually related to the episode's plot. One particularly ironic example is in "Virtual Reality Bytes", which centers around a kid's video game addiction. The moral was essentially "don't play the video games all the damn time"--which, while certainly a good moral, is kind of odd coming from an adaptation of a video game.

to:

* AndKnowingIsHalfTheBattle - Every episode, except for the pilot, ended with a public service announcement featuring the heroes teaching some kind of moral to kids, as was standard with most animated shows at the time.
**
The Season 1 [=PSAs=] were pretty generic in nature, being nothing more than redubbed scenes from the actual show and recycled that were clearly redubbed at the last minute to shoehorn a lesson in order to meet the education content quota required for children programming at the time. There were only six [=PSAs] made for the first season, so the show reuses them all for the latter half of the season. season.
**
The Season 2 [=PSAs=] on the other hand were unique to each episode and had morals that were actually related to the episode's plot. One particularly ironic example is in "Virtual Reality Bytes", which centers around a kid's video game addiction. The moral was essentially "don't play the video games all the damn time"--which, while certainly a good moral, is kind of odd coming from an adaptation of a video game.
15th Jun '17 1:02:32 PM Piterpicher
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The first episode makes a fair adaptation of the first game (at least the NES version, which had Jimmy [[AdaptationalVillainy as the final boss]] and [[DemotedToDragon Willy as his henchman]]), but the series deviates from Episode 2 and onward. However, a tie-in video game titled ''VideoGame/DoubleDragonVTheShadowFalls'' was produced by the franchise's U.S. license holder at the time Tradewest, released in late 1994 on the [[SuperNintendoEntertainmentSystem Super NES]], [[SegaGenesis Genesis]] and [[AtariJaguar Jaguar]].

to:

The first episode makes a fair adaptation of the first game (at least the NES version, which had Jimmy [[AdaptationalVillainy as the final boss]] and [[DemotedToDragon Willy as his henchman]]), but the series deviates from Episode 2 and onward. However, a tie-in video game titled ''VideoGame/DoubleDragonVTheShadowFalls'' was produced by the franchise's U.S. license holder at the time Tradewest, released in late 1994 on the [[SuperNintendoEntertainmentSystem [[UsefulNotes/SuperNintendoEntertainmentSystem Super NES]], [[SegaGenesis [[UsefulNotes/SegaGenesis Genesis]] and [[AtariJaguar [[UsefulNotes/AtariJaguar Jaguar]].
23rd Aug '16 11:32:07 AM DarkStorm
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* InNameOnly: The Pilot makes a fair adaptation of the first NES game and even features bad guys from the game (namely Abobo and Machine Gun Willy), but the rest of the series deviates from the games completely, with the Shadow Master being loosely modeled after the unnamed fighter from the second NES game.

to:

* InNameOnly: The Pilot makes a fair adaptation of the first NES game and even features bad guys from the game (namely Abobo and Machine Gun Willy), Willy, though the latter is now a cowboy named "Wild Willy" wielding a pair of laser pistols), but the rest of the series deviates from the games completely, with the Shadow Master being loosely modeled after the unnamed fighter final boss from the second NES game.
16th Aug '16 8:03:56 PM Saurubiker
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Billy Lee was raised and trained by the master of the Dragon Dojo. His main precepts are not to harm others intentionally and not fight if he can help it. When the master [[NeverSayDie is gone]], Billy becomes the new Dragon Master. He helps officer Marian Martin against the Shadow Warriors, a criminal syndicate led by the Shadow Master, wielder of the power of the Black Flame. Billy discovers that the Shadow Master's second-in-command, the Shadow Boss, is none other than his long-lost twin brother Jimmy. But when the Shadow Master betrays Jimmy, the brothers join forces in the fight against the Shadow Warriors.

The first episode makes a fair adaptation of the first game (at least the NES version, which had Jimmy [[AdaptationalVillainy as the final boss]] and [[DemotedToDragon Willy as his henchman]]), but the series deviates from Episode 2 and onward.

to:

Billy and Jimmy Lee was are twin brothers who were separated at birth and raised and trained by the master of opposing factions. Billy is raised in the Dragon Dojo. His Dojo by the Eldest Dragon, who trains him in the ways of the Code of the Dragon. The Code's main precepts are not to harm others intentionally and not fight if he can help it. When the master Eldest Dragon [[NeverSayDie is gone]], Billy becomes the new Dragon Master. He helps officer Master at the age of 18. Joining forces with policewoman Marian Martin against Martin, Billy fights to protect the city from the Shadow Warriors, a criminal syndicate organization initially led by the Shadow Master, wielder of the power of the Black Flame. Billy discovers that the Shadow Master's second-in-command, the mysterious Shadow Boss, who is revealed to be none other than his long-lost long lost twin brother Jimmy. But when Initially the Shadow Master betrays Jimmy, the two brothers oppose each other, but when Jimmy is betrayed by his own men, he abandon his evil ways and join forces in the to fight against the [[TheManBehindTheMan true leader]] of the Shadow Warriors.

Warriors himself, the Shadow Master, who wishes to engulf the world with the power of the black flame.

The first episode makes a fair adaptation of the first game (at least the NES version, which had Jimmy [[AdaptationalVillainy as the final boss]] and [[DemotedToDragon Willy as his henchman]]), but the series deviates from Episode 2 and onward. However, a tie-in video game titled ''VideoGame/DoubleDragonVTheShadowFalls'' was produced by the franchise's U.S. license holder at the time Tradewest, released in late 1994 on the [[SuperNintendoEntertainmentSystem Super NES]], [[SegaGenesis Genesis]] and [[AtariJaguar Jaguar]].



* AndKnowingIsHalfTheBattle - Every episode, except for the first one, ended with a public service announcement featuring the heroes teaching some kind of moral to kids, as was standard with most animated shows at the time. The Season 1 [=PSAs=] were pretty generic in nature, being nothing more than redubbed scenes from the actual show, with most of them being used for more than one episode. On the other hand, the Season 2 [=PSAs=] were unique to each episode and had morals that were actually related to the episode's plot. One particularly ironic example is in "Virtual Reality Bytes", which centers around a kid's video game addiction. The moral was essentially "don't play the videogames all the damn time"--which, while certainly a good moral, is kind of odd coming from an adaptation of a video game.

to:

* AndKnowingIsHalfTheBattle - Every episode, except for the first one, pilot, ended with a public service announcement featuring the heroes teaching some kind of moral to kids, as was standard with most animated shows at the time. The Season 1 [=PSAs=] were pretty generic in nature, being nothing more than redubbed scenes from the actual show, with most of them being used show and recycled for more than one episode. On half the other hand, the season. The Season 2 [=PSAs=] on the other hand were unique to each episode and had morals that were actually related to the episode's plot. One particularly ironic example is in "Virtual Reality Bytes", which centers around a kid's video game addiction. The moral was essentially "don't play the videogames video games all the damn time"--which, while certainly a good moral, is kind of odd coming from an adaptation of a video game.



* ArtEvolution: First inverted, then played straight (sort of). While the pilot episode[[note]]by {{Creator/Saerom}}[[/note]] wasn't anything special, it ''was'' leaps and bounds better than the rest of season 1[[note]]Animated by Creator/PacificRimAnimation, the animators behind ''{{WesternAnimation/Hammerman}}'' and ''WesternAnimation/SuperMarioWorld''[[/note]]. Season two[[note]]with animation duties now taken over by Creator/HongYing[[/note]] ''was'' a marked improvement to the first season, but it was still pretty bad in many spots.

to:

* ArtEvolution: First inverted, then played straight (sort of). While the pilot episode[[note]]by {{Creator/Saerom}}[[/note]] wasn't anything special, it ''was'' leaps and bounds better than the rest of season Season 1[[note]]Animated by Creator/PacificRimAnimation, the animators behind ''{{WesternAnimation/Hammerman}}'' and ''WesternAnimation/SuperMarioWorld''[[/note]]. Season two[[note]]with 2[[note]]with animation duties now taken over by Creator/HongYing[[/note]] ''was'' a marked improvement to the first season, but it was still pretty bad in many spots.
27th Jun '16 5:56:56 AM philipnova798
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* ArtEvolution: First inverted, then played straight (sort of). While the pilot episode[[note]]by {{Creator/Saerom}}[[/note]] wasn't anything special, it was leaps and bounds better than the rest of season 1[[note]]Animated by Creator/PacificRimAnimation, the animators behind ''{{WesternAnimation/Hammerman}}'' and ''WesternAnimation/SuperMarioWorld''[[/note]]. Season two[[note]]with animation duties now taken over by Creator/HongYing[[/note]] ''was'' a marked improvement to the first season, but it was still pretty bad in many spots.

to:

* ArtEvolution: First inverted, then played straight (sort of). While the pilot episode[[note]]by {{Creator/Saerom}}[[/note]] wasn't anything special, it was ''was'' leaps and bounds better than the rest of season 1[[note]]Animated by Creator/PacificRimAnimation, the animators behind ''{{WesternAnimation/Hammerman}}'' and ''WesternAnimation/SuperMarioWorld''[[/note]]. Season two[[note]]with animation duties now taken over by Creator/HongYing[[/note]] ''was'' a marked improvement to the first season, but it was still pretty bad in many spots.
27th Jun '16 5:54:41 AM philipnova798
Is there an issue? Send a Message


* ArtEvolution: First inverted, then played straight (sort of). While the pilot episode[[note]]by {{Creator/Saerom}}[[/note]] wasn't anything special, it was leaps and bounds better than the rest of season 1[[note]]Animated by Creator/PacificRimAnimation, the animators behind ''{{WesternAnimation/Hammerman}}'' and ''WesternAnimation/SuperMarioWorld''[[/note]]. Season two[[note]]with animation duties now taken over by Creator/HongYingAnimation[[/note]] ''was'' a marked improvement to the first season, but it was still pretty bad in many spots.

to:

* ArtEvolution: First inverted, then played straight (sort of). While the pilot episode[[note]]by {{Creator/Saerom}}[[/note]] wasn't anything special, it was leaps and bounds better than the rest of season 1[[note]]Animated by Creator/PacificRimAnimation, the animators behind ''{{WesternAnimation/Hammerman}}'' and ''WesternAnimation/SuperMarioWorld''[[/note]]. Season two[[note]]with animation duties now taken over by Creator/HongYingAnimation[[/note]] Creator/HongYing[[/note]] ''was'' a marked improvement to the first season, but it was still pretty bad in many spots.
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