History WesternAnimation / DoubleDragon

23rd Aug '16 11:32:07 AM DarkStorm
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* InNameOnly: The Pilot makes a fair adaptation of the first NES game and even features bad guys from the game (namely Abobo and Machine Gun Willy), but the rest of the series deviates from the games completely, with the Shadow Master being loosely modeled after the unnamed fighter from the second NES game.

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* InNameOnly: The Pilot makes a fair adaptation of the first NES game and even features bad guys from the game (namely Abobo and Machine Gun Willy), Willy, though the latter is now a cowboy named "Wild Willy" wielding a pair of laser pistols), but the rest of the series deviates from the games completely, with the Shadow Master being loosely modeled after the unnamed fighter final boss from the second NES game.
16th Aug '16 8:03:56 PM Saurubiker
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Billy Lee was raised and trained by the master of the Dragon Dojo. His main precepts are not to harm others intentionally and not fight if he can help it. When the master [[NeverSayDie is gone]], Billy becomes the new Dragon Master. He helps officer Marian Martin against the Shadow Warriors, a criminal syndicate led by the Shadow Master, wielder of the power of the Black Flame. Billy discovers that the Shadow Master's second-in-command, the Shadow Boss, is none other than his long-lost twin brother Jimmy. But when the Shadow Master betrays Jimmy, the brothers join forces in the fight against the Shadow Warriors.

The first episode makes a fair adaptation of the first game (at least the NES version, which had Jimmy [[AdaptationalVillainy as the final boss]] and [[DemotedToDragon Willy as his henchman]]), but the series deviates from Episode 2 and onward.

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Billy and Jimmy Lee was are twin brothers who were separated at birth and raised and trained by the master of opposing factions. Billy is raised in the Dragon Dojo. His Dojo by the Eldest Dragon, who trains him in the ways of the Code of the Dragon. The Code's main precepts are not to harm others intentionally and not fight if he can help it. When the master Eldest Dragon [[NeverSayDie is gone]], Billy becomes the new Dragon Master. He helps officer Master at the age of 18. Joining forces with policewoman Marian Martin against Martin, Billy fights to protect the city from the Shadow Warriors, a criminal syndicate organization initially led by the Shadow Master, wielder of the power of the Black Flame. Billy discovers that the Shadow Master's second-in-command, the mysterious Shadow Boss, who is revealed to be none other than his long-lost long lost twin brother Jimmy. But when Initially the Shadow Master betrays Jimmy, the two brothers oppose each other, but when Jimmy is betrayed by his own men, he abandon his evil ways and join forces in the to fight against the [[TheManBehindTheMan true leader]] of the Shadow Warriors.

Warriors himself, the Shadow Master, who wishes to engulf the world with the power of the black flame.

The first episode makes a fair adaptation of the first game (at least the NES version, which had Jimmy [[AdaptationalVillainy as the final boss]] and [[DemotedToDragon Willy as his henchman]]), but the series deviates from Episode 2 and onward. However, a tie-in video game titled ''VideoGame/DoubleDragonVTheShadowFalls'' was produced by the franchise's U.S. license holder at the time Tradewest, released in late 1994 on the [[SuperNintendoEntertainmentSystem Super NES]], [[SegaGenesis Genesis]] and [[AtariJaguar Jaguar]].



* AndKnowingIsHalfTheBattle - Every episode, except for the first one, ended with a public service announcement featuring the heroes teaching some kind of moral to kids, as was standard with most animated shows at the time. The Season 1 [=PSAs=] were pretty generic in nature, being nothing more than redubbed scenes from the actual show, with most of them being used for more than one episode. On the other hand, the Season 2 [=PSAs=] were unique to each episode and had morals that were actually related to the episode's plot. One particularly ironic example is in "Virtual Reality Bytes", which centers around a kid's video game addiction. The moral was essentially "don't play the videogames all the damn time"--which, while certainly a good moral, is kind of odd coming from an adaptation of a video game.

to:

* AndKnowingIsHalfTheBattle - Every episode, except for the first one, pilot, ended with a public service announcement featuring the heroes teaching some kind of moral to kids, as was standard with most animated shows at the time. The Season 1 [=PSAs=] were pretty generic in nature, being nothing more than redubbed scenes from the actual show, with most of them being used show and recycled for more than one episode. On half the other hand, the season. The Season 2 [=PSAs=] on the other hand were unique to each episode and had morals that were actually related to the episode's plot. One particularly ironic example is in "Virtual Reality Bytes", which centers around a kid's video game addiction. The moral was essentially "don't play the videogames video games all the damn time"--which, while certainly a good moral, is kind of odd coming from an adaptation of a video game.



* ArtEvolution: First inverted, then played straight (sort of). While the pilot episode[[note]]by {{Creator/Saerom}}[[/note]] wasn't anything special, it ''was'' leaps and bounds better than the rest of season 1[[note]]Animated by Creator/PacificRimAnimation, the animators behind ''{{WesternAnimation/Hammerman}}'' and ''WesternAnimation/SuperMarioWorld''[[/note]]. Season two[[note]]with animation duties now taken over by Creator/HongYing[[/note]] ''was'' a marked improvement to the first season, but it was still pretty bad in many spots.

to:

* ArtEvolution: First inverted, then played straight (sort of). While the pilot episode[[note]]by {{Creator/Saerom}}[[/note]] wasn't anything special, it ''was'' leaps and bounds better than the rest of season Season 1[[note]]Animated by Creator/PacificRimAnimation, the animators behind ''{{WesternAnimation/Hammerman}}'' and ''WesternAnimation/SuperMarioWorld''[[/note]]. Season two[[note]]with 2[[note]]with animation duties now taken over by Creator/HongYing[[/note]] ''was'' a marked improvement to the first season, but it was still pretty bad in many spots.
27th Jun '16 5:56:56 AM philipnova798
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* ArtEvolution: First inverted, then played straight (sort of). While the pilot episode[[note]]by {{Creator/Saerom}}[[/note]] wasn't anything special, it was leaps and bounds better than the rest of season 1[[note]]Animated by Creator/PacificRimAnimation, the animators behind ''{{WesternAnimation/Hammerman}}'' and ''WesternAnimation/SuperMarioWorld''[[/note]]. Season two[[note]]with animation duties now taken over by Creator/HongYing[[/note]] ''was'' a marked improvement to the first season, but it was still pretty bad in many spots.

to:

* ArtEvolution: First inverted, then played straight (sort of). While the pilot episode[[note]]by {{Creator/Saerom}}[[/note]] wasn't anything special, it was ''was'' leaps and bounds better than the rest of season 1[[note]]Animated by Creator/PacificRimAnimation, the animators behind ''{{WesternAnimation/Hammerman}}'' and ''WesternAnimation/SuperMarioWorld''[[/note]]. Season two[[note]]with animation duties now taken over by Creator/HongYing[[/note]] ''was'' a marked improvement to the first season, but it was still pretty bad in many spots.
27th Jun '16 5:54:41 AM philipnova798
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* ArtEvolution: First inverted, then played straight (sort of). While the pilot episode[[note]]by {{Creator/Saerom}}[[/note]] wasn't anything special, it was leaps and bounds better than the rest of season 1[[note]]Animated by Creator/PacificRimAnimation, the animators behind ''{{WesternAnimation/Hammerman}}'' and ''WesternAnimation/SuperMarioWorld''[[/note]]. Season two[[note]]with animation duties now taken over by Creator/HongYingAnimation[[/note]] ''was'' a marked improvement to the first season, but it was still pretty bad in many spots.

to:

* ArtEvolution: First inverted, then played straight (sort of). While the pilot episode[[note]]by {{Creator/Saerom}}[[/note]] wasn't anything special, it was leaps and bounds better than the rest of season 1[[note]]Animated by Creator/PacificRimAnimation, the animators behind ''{{WesternAnimation/Hammerman}}'' and ''WesternAnimation/SuperMarioWorld''[[/note]]. Season two[[note]]with animation duties now taken over by Creator/HongYingAnimation[[/note]] Creator/HongYing[[/note]] ''was'' a marked improvement to the first season, but it was still pretty bad in many spots.
27th Jun '16 5:54:24 AM philipnova798
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Added DiffLines:

* ArtEvolution: First inverted, then played straight (sort of). While the pilot episode[[note]]by {{Creator/Saerom}}[[/note]] wasn't anything special, it was leaps and bounds better than the rest of season 1[[note]]Animated by Creator/PacificRimAnimation, the animators behind ''{{WesternAnimation/Hammerman}}'' and ''WesternAnimation/SuperMarioWorld''[[/note]]. Season two[[note]]with animation duties now taken over by Creator/HongYingAnimation[[/note]] ''was'' a marked improvement to the first season, but it was still pretty bad in many spots.
2nd Dec '15 12:45:15 AM Saurubiker
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** Most of the Dragon Warriors (save for Billy and Jimmy themselves) and the Shadow Warriors (the gang exists in the games, but not this specific roster) were created specifically for the cartoon. Granted, the Shadow Master appears to be loosely based on the nameless final boss from the second NES game.

to:

** Most of the Dragon Warriors (save (except for Billy and Jimmy themselves) and the Shadow Warriors (the gang exists in the games, but not this specific roster) were created specifically for the cartoon. Granted, the Shadow Master appears to be loosely based on the nameless final boss from the second NES game.



* CutShort: The Lee brothers never get to defeat the Shadow Master, nor do they ever find their missing father. "Daj of the Undertown Dragons" ends with a {{sequel hook}} for an unmade third season.

to:

* CutShort: The Lee brothers never get to defeat the Shadow Master, nor do are they ever find reunited with their missing father. "Daj of the Undertown Dragons" ends with a {{sequel hook}} for an unmade third season.



* InNameOnly: The Pilot makes a fair adaptation of the first NES game and even features bad guys from the game (namely Abobo and Machine Gun Willy), but the rest of the series deviates from the games completely.

to:

* InNameOnly: The Pilot makes a fair adaptation of the first NES game and even features bad guys from the game (namely Abobo and Machine Gun Willy), but the rest of the series deviates from the games completely.completely, with the Shadow Master being loosely modeled after the unnamed fighter from the second NES game.



* {{Mooks}}: The generic Shadow Warriors all wore metal mouthplates and were armed with claws. Blade from the tie-in fighting game was essentially one of them (along with Sekka, who was a one-of-a-kind female counterpart).

to:

* {{Mooks}}: The generic Shadow Warriors all wore metal mouthplates and were armed with claws. Blade from the tie-in fighting game ''Double Dragon V'' was essentially one of them (along with Sekka, who was a one-of-a-kind his female counterpart).counterpart, Sekka).
2nd Dec '15 12:39:00 AM Saurubiker
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* ToylessToylineCharacter: Despite being a blatantly MerchandiseDriven show, the only characters to get tie-in action figures besides the Lee brothers and the Shadow Master were Vortex, Blaster, Sickle and Trigger Happy, rendering everyone else into this.

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* ToylessToylineCharacter: Despite being a blatantly MerchandiseDriven show, the only characters to get tie-in action figures besides the Lee brothers and the Shadow Master were Vortex, Blaster, Sickle and Trigger Happy, rendering everyone else into this.Happy. A second wave of figures were planned for the powered up forms of the Lee brothers and the Shadow Master, as well as Kona, but these were not widely released.
21st Feb '15 2:40:31 PM Saurubiker
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* AndKnowingIsHalfTheBattle - Every episode, except for the Pilot, ended with a public service announcement with the heroes teaching some kind of moral to kids, as was standard with most kids shows at the time. The Season 1 [=PSAs=] were pretty generic in nature, being nothing more than redubbed scenes from the actual show, with most of them being used for more than one episode. On the other hand, the Season 2 [=PSAs=] were unique to each episode and had morals that were actually related to the episode's plot. One particularly ironic example is in "Virtual Reality Bytes", which centers around a kid's video game addiction. The moral was essentially "don't play the videogames all the damn time"--which, while certainly a good moral, is kind of odd coming from an adaptation of a video game.

to:

* AndKnowingIsHalfTheBattle - Every episode, except for the Pilot, first one, ended with a public service announcement with featuring the heroes teaching some kind of moral to kids, as was standard with most kids animated shows at the time. The Season 1 [=PSAs=] were pretty generic in nature, being nothing more than redubbed scenes from the actual show, with most of them being used for more than one episode. On the other hand, the Season 2 [=PSAs=] were unique to each episode and had morals that were actually related to the episode's plot. One particularly ironic example is in "Virtual Reality Bytes", which centers around a kid's video game addiction. The moral was essentially "don't play the videogames all the damn time"--which, while certainly a good moral, is kind of odd coming from an adaptation of a video game.
21st Feb '15 2:38:43 PM Saurubiker
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* AndKnowingIsHalfTheBattle - Like other kids shows at the time, each episode after the Pilot ended with a public service announcement where Billy and Jimmy would teach some sort of moral to kids. The Season 1 [=PSAs=] were pretty generic in nature, often consisting of redubbed scenes from the actual episodes and with most of them being used for more than one episode. The Season 2 [=PSAs=] on the other hand were unique to each episode and had morals that were actually related to the episode's plot. One particularly ironic example is in "Virtual Reality Bytes", which centers around a kid's video game addiction. The moral was essentially "don't play the videogames all the damn time"--which, while certainly a good moral, is kind of odd coming from an adaptation of a video game.

to:

* AndKnowingIsHalfTheBattle - Like other kids shows at Every episode, except for the time, each episode after the Pilot Pilot, ended with a public service announcement where Billy and Jimmy would teach with the heroes teaching some sort kind of moral to kids. kids, as was standard with most kids shows at the time. The Season 1 [=PSAs=] were pretty generic in nature, often consisting of being nothing more than redubbed scenes from the actual episodes and show, with most of them being used for more than one episode. The On the other hand, the Season 2 [=PSAs=] on the other hand were unique to each episode and had morals that were actually related to the episode's plot. One particularly ironic example is in "Virtual Reality Bytes", which centers around a kid's video game addiction. The moral was essentially "don't play the videogames all the damn time"--which, while certainly a good moral, is kind of odd coming from an adaptation of a video game.
21st Feb '15 2:31:43 PM Saurubiker
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* AndKnowingIsHalfTheBattle - Both seasons featured a public service announcement at the end of every episode (except for the pilot), but the ones in Season 1 were rather generic (consisting almost entirely of redubbed footage) and some were repeated in different episodes. On the other hand, the [=PSAs=] in Season 2 were unique to each episode and were somehow tied to the episode's plot. One particularly ironic example was an early Season 2 episode about a kid who was really into video games. The moral was essentially "don't play the videogames all the damn time"--which, while certainly a good moral, is kind of odd coming from an adaptation of a video game.

to:

* AndKnowingIsHalfTheBattle - Both seasons featured Like other kids shows at the time, each episode after the Pilot ended with a public service announcement at the end where Billy and Jimmy would teach some sort of every episode (except for the pilot), but the ones in moral to kids. The Season 1 [=PSAs=] were rather pretty generic (consisting almost entirely in nature, often consisting of redubbed footage) scenes from the actual episodes and some were repeated in different episodes. On with most of them being used for more than one episode. The Season 2 [=PSAs=] on the other hand, the [=PSAs=] in Season 2 hand were unique to each episode and had morals that were somehow tied actually related to the episode's plot. One particularly ironic example was an early Season 2 episode about is in "Virtual Reality Bytes", which centers around a kid who was really into kid's video games.game addiction. The moral was essentially "don't play the videogames all the damn time"--which, while certainly a good moral, is kind of odd coming from an adaptation of a video game.



** Most of the Dragon Warriors (save for Billy and Jimmy themselves) and the Shadow Warriors (the gang exists in the games, but not these specific members) were created specifically for the cartoon. Granted, the Shadow Master appears to be loosely based on the nameless final boss from the second NES game.

to:

** Most of the Dragon Warriors (save for Billy and Jimmy themselves) and the Shadow Warriors (the gang exists in the games, but not these this specific members) roster) were created specifically for the cartoon. Granted, the Shadow Master appears to be loosely based on the nameless final boss from the second NES game.



* ColorCodedSecretIdentity: For some reason, many characters have trouble figuring out that Billy and Jimmy were actually the Double Dragons, despite the fact that they always carry their swords. There's not even that much difference between their civilian clothing and their Dragon Warrior alter-egos, save for the addition of masks, lack of undershirts (exposing their birthmarks) and different boots and gloves. Not to mention that Billy was already fighting crime with his birthmark exposed in the first episode.

to:

* ColorCodedSecretIdentity: For some reason, many of the civilian characters have trouble figuring out that Billy and Jimmy were the Lee brothers are actually the Double Dragons, despite the fact that they always carry their swords. swords with them. There's actually not even that much difference between their civilian clothing and their Dragon Warrior alter-egos, save for the addition of masks, the lack of undershirts (exposing their birthmarks) birthmarks), and the different boots and gloves. Not to mention that Billy was already fighting crime with his birthmark exposed in the first episode.



* CutShort: The Lee brothers never get to defeat the Shadow Master, nor do they ever find their missing father. "Daj of the Undertown Dragons" ends with a {{sequel hook}} for an unproduced third season.

to:

* CutShort: The Lee brothers never get to defeat the Shadow Master, nor do they ever find their missing father. "Daj of the Undertown Dragons" ends with a {{sequel hook}} for an unproduced unmade third season.



* DragonsUpTheYinYang: In addition to the gratuitous dragon imagery from the game, the show added various gratuitous dragon-themed accessories, such as masks, tattoos, and medallions. A good example would be the Shadow Warriors' insignia, a Yin-Yang with dragons [[note]]that look like an S in distant shots[[/note]] instead of the spots.

to:

* DragonsUpTheYinYang: In addition to the gratuitous dragon imagery from the game, the show added various gratuitous dragon-themed accessories, such as masks, tattoos, and medallions. A good example would be the Shadow Warriors' insignia, a Yin-Yang with dragons [[note]]that look like an S in distant shots[[/note]] instead of the spots.



* InNameOnly: Besides some characters, it has nothing to do with the games.
** To be fair, The first episode makes a fair adaptation of the first game (at least the NES version, which had Jimmy as the final boss and Willy as his henchman).
* LukeIAmYourFather: When the brothers meet their mother, she reveals the Shadow Master is her half-brother, [[CaptainObvious which makes him their uncle]].

to:

* InNameOnly: Besides some characters, it has nothing to do with the games.
** To be fair,
The first episode Pilot makes a fair adaptation of the first NES game (at least and even features bad guys from the NES version, which had Jimmy as game (namely Abobo and Machine Gun Willy), but the final boss rest of the series deviates from the games completely.
* KidSidekick: Michael
and Willy as his henchman).
most of the Junior Dragons.
* LukeIAmYourFather: When the brothers meet their mother, she reveals that the Shadow Master is her half-brother, [[CaptainObvious which makes him their uncle]].



* OutOfOrder: Most of the episodes were aired without regard to their production order, especially during Season 2. Particularly notable with "RPM", the final new episode aired, which clearly took place before Jawbreaker's HeelFaceTurn in "The Sight of Freedom". "Daj of the Undertown Dragons" was the last episode made in production order.

to:

* OutOfOrder: Most of the The Season 2 episodes were aired without regard to their production order, especially during Season 2. actual continuity. Particularly notable with "RPM", the final new episode aired, which clearly took place before Jawbreaker's HeelFaceTurn in "The Sight of Freedom". "Daj of the Undertown Dragons" was the last episode made in production order.



* SuspiciouslySimilarSubstitute: Triggerhappy seems to be this for Willy from episode 2 onwards.

to:

** The Shadow Khan: SixthRangerTraitor
* SuspiciouslySimilarSubstitute: Triggerhappy seems to be this for Willy from episode Episode 2 onwards.
This list shows the last 10 events of 71. Show all.
http://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/article_history.php?article=WesternAnimation.DoubleDragon