History WesternAnimation / CensoredEleven

18th Sep '17 6:56:51 AM Saveelich
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* {{Blackface}}: Many jokes poke fun at black people, depicting them with enormous frog like lips, lazy or dimwitted behaviour, and jive talk. Scenes of them eating water melons, stealing chickens, being scared of ghosts, obsessed with throwing dice and more are also rampant. Expect some imagery set in the days of slavery to turn up or jokes where their skin color turns out to be just black paint. Though a lot if it thrives on stereotypes that were typical of the time, it must be said that this imagery was seen in many live-action films of that time period, including works with actual Afro-American actors and musicians like Music/LouisArmstrong, Stepin Fetchit, Hattie [=McDaniel=], Creator/JosephineBaker and others. So, in some cases, these jokes were meant as innocent parodies that modern audiences, [[PopCulturalOsmosisFailure unaware of the stuff referenced]], will find offensive.

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* {{Blackface}}: Many jokes poke fun at black people, depicting them with enormous frog like lips, lazy or dimwitted behaviour, and jive talk. Scenes of them eating water melons, stealing chickens, being scared of ghosts, obsessed with throwing dice and more are also rampant. Expect some imagery set in the days of slavery to turn up or jokes where their skin color turns out to be just black paint. Though a lot if it thrives on stereotypes that were typical of the time, it must be said that this imagery was seen in many live-action films of that time period, including works with actual Afro-American actors and musicians like Music/LouisArmstrong, Stepin Fetchit, Hattie [=McDaniel=], Creator/JosephineBaker and others. So, in some cases, these jokes were meant as innocent parodies that modern audiences, [[PopCulturalOsmosisFailure unaware of the stuff it referenced]], will find offensive.
9th Sep '17 5:29:35 PM Saveelich
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* ''WesternAnimation/UncleTomsBungalow'' -- 1937, directed by Creator/TexAvery

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* ''WesternAnimation/UncleTomsBungalow'' ''[[WesternAnimation/UncleTomsBungalow Uncle Tom's Bungalow]]'' -- 1937, directed by Creator/TexAvery
9th Sep '17 5:20:21 PM Saveelich
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* ''WesternAnimation/{{Uncle Tom's Bungalow}}'' -- 1937, directed by Creator/TexAvery

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* ''WesternAnimation/{{Uncle Tom's Bungalow}}'' ''WesternAnimation/UncleTomsBungalow'' -- 1937, directed by Creator/TexAvery
9th Sep '17 5:20:07 PM Saveelich
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* ''Uncle Tom's Bungalow'' -- 1937, directed by Creator/TexAvery

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* ''Uncle ''WesternAnimation/{{Uncle Tom's Bungalow'' Bungalow}}'' -- 1937, directed by Creator/TexAvery
17th Jul '17 3:57:02 AM glickmam
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* {{Blackface}}: Many jokes poke fun at black people, depicting them with enormous frog like lips, lazy or dimwitted behaviour, and jive talk. Scenes of them eating water melons, stealing chickens, being scared of ghosts, obsessed with throwing dice and more are also rampant. Expect some imagery set in the days of slavery to turn up or jokes where their skin color turns out to be just black paint. Though a lot if it thrives on stereotypes that were typical of the time, it must be said that this imagery was seen in many live-action films of that time period, including works with actual Afro-American actors and musicians like Music/LouisArmstrong, Stepin Fetchit, Hattie [=McDaniel=], Creator/JosephineBaker and others. So, in some cases, these jokes were meant as innocent parodies that modern audiences, [[PopCultureOsmosisFailure unaware of the stuff referenced]], will find offensive.

to:

* {{Blackface}}: Many jokes poke fun at black people, depicting them with enormous frog like lips, lazy or dimwitted behaviour, and jive talk. Scenes of them eating water melons, stealing chickens, being scared of ghosts, obsessed with throwing dice and more are also rampant. Expect some imagery set in the days of slavery to turn up or jokes where their skin color turns out to be just black paint. Though a lot if it thrives on stereotypes that were typical of the time, it must be said that this imagery was seen in many live-action films of that time period, including works with actual Afro-American actors and musicians like Music/LouisArmstrong, Stepin Fetchit, Hattie [=McDaniel=], Creator/JosephineBaker and others. So, in some cases, these jokes were meant as innocent parodies that modern audiences, [[PopCultureOsmosisFailure [[PopCulturalOsmosisFailure unaware of the stuff referenced]], will find offensive.
16th Jul '17 6:45:15 PM MasterofGalaxies4628
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In the history of media, there are works that may not seem overtly controversial at the time of their creation, but later come to be regarded as such as time passes and perceptions of morals, beliefs, and societial issues change. Animation is no different, and there is no better example of this within the medium than the '''Censored Eleven'''.

The "Censored Eleven" are a collection of eleven different animated shorts -- ten released under the [[WesternAnimation/LooneyTunes Merrie Melodies]] label, one released under the WesternAnimation/LooneyTunes label -- created between the years of [[UsefulNotes/TheGoldenAgeOfAnimation 1931 and 1944]]. The full list is as follows:

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In the history of media, there are works that [[FairForItsDay may not seem overtly controversial at the time of their creation, but later come to be regarded as such as time passes and perceptions of morals, beliefs, and societial issues change.change]]. Animation is no different, and there is no better example of this within the medium than the '''Censored Eleven'''.

The "Censored Eleven" are a collection of eleven [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnTheTin eleven]] different ''WesternAnimation/LooneyTunes'' animated shorts -- ten shorts--ten of which were released under the [[WesternAnimation/LooneyTunes Merrie Melodies]] label, one released under the WesternAnimation/LooneyTunes label -- created ''Merrie Melodies'' label--created between the years of [[UsefulNotes/TheGoldenAgeOfAnimation 1931 and 1944]]. The full list is as follows:



The "Censored Eleven" are called so because in 1968, Associated Artists Productions rightsowner United Artists deemed all eleven of the short films -- which contained numerous depictions of black people that are considered offensive -- to be ''too'' offensive for contemporary audiences (especially in light of the civil rights movement) and pulled them all from distribution. Unlike other shorts released at the time that were later edited to remove any racially-themed jokes (such as those found in various ''WesternAnimation/TomAndJerry'' and ''WesternAnimation/LooneyTunes'' shorts), the racial themes in the Censored Eleven are so pervasive and thoroughly central to the plot of each of the shorts that editing them would essentially render the shorts into nothingness. Since 1968, the owners of the rights to these shorts -- including the current rightsholders, Time Warner -- have refused to show any one of them on television or (with a single exception) in theaters.

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The "Censored Eleven" are called so because in 1968, Associated Artists Productions rightsowner United Artists deemed all eleven of the short films -- which contained numerous depictions of black people that are considered offensive -- to be ''too'' offensive for contemporary audiences (especially in light of the civil rights movement) UsefulNotes/CivilRightsMovement) and pulled them all from distribution. Unlike other shorts released at the time that were later edited to remove any racially-themed jokes (such as those found in various ''WesternAnimation/TomAndJerry'' and ''WesternAnimation/LooneyTunes'' shorts), the racial themes in the Censored Eleven are so pervasive and thoroughly central to the plot of each of the shorts that editing them out would essentially render the shorts into nothingness. Since 1968, the owners of the rights to these shorts -- including the current rightsholders, Time Warner -- have refused to show any one of them on television or (with a single exception) in theaters.



* {{Blackface}}: Many jokes poke fun at black people, depicting them with enormous frog like lips, lazy or dimwitted behaviour and jive talk. Scenes of them eating water melons, stealing chickens, being scared of ghosts, obsessed with throwing dice and more are also rampant. Expect some imagery set in the days of slavery to turn up or jokes where their skin color turns out to be just black paint. Though a lot if it thrives on stereotypes that were typical of the time it must be said that this imagery was seen in many live-action films of that time period, including works with actual Afro-American actors and musicians like Music/LouisArmstrong, Stepin Fetchit, Hattie [=McDaniel=], Creator/JosephineBaker and others. So, in some cases these jokes were meant as innocent parodies that modern audiences, unaware of the stuff referenced, will find offensive.

to:

* {{Blackface}}: Many jokes poke fun at black people, depicting them with enormous frog like lips, lazy or dimwitted behaviour behaviour, and jive talk. Scenes of them eating water melons, stealing chickens, being scared of ghosts, obsessed with throwing dice and more are also rampant. Expect some imagery set in the days of slavery to turn up or jokes where their skin color turns out to be just black paint. Though a lot if it thrives on stereotypes that were typical of the time time, it must be said that this imagery was seen in many live-action films of that time period, including works with actual Afro-American actors and musicians like Music/LouisArmstrong, Stepin Fetchit, Hattie [=McDaniel=], Creator/JosephineBaker and others. So, in some cases cases, these jokes were meant as innocent parodies that modern audiences, [[PopCultureOsmosisFailure unaware of the stuff referenced, referenced]], will find offensive.
14th Jul '17 4:45:38 PM Nazo
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* ''Clean Pastures'' -- 1937, directed by Friz Freleng. It is interesting to note that this cartoon nearly got banned when it was released in the late 1930s, not for race, but for religious reasons (the Hays Office thought people at the time would be offended that blacks are depicted as heavenly creatures and even The Devil wants to get into Heaven) and for glamorizing vices (gambling, sex [the showgirls dancing to "Sweet Georgia Brown"], and booze). [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=axt-av4zKo8 Watch]]

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* ''Clean Pastures'' -- 1937, directed by Friz Freleng. It is interesting to note that this cartoon nearly got banned when it was released in the late 1930s, not for race, but for religious reasons (the Hays Office thought people at the time would be offended that blacks black people are depicted as heavenly creatures and even The Devil wants to get into Heaven) and for glamorizing vices (gambling, sex [the showgirls dancing to "Sweet Georgia Brown"], and booze). [[http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=axt-av4zKo8 Watch]]
10th Feb '17 6:40:43 PM Prinzenick
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* ''Tin Pan Alley Cats'' -- 1943, directed by Creator/BobClampett. One of Literature/The100GreatestLooneyTunes.

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* ''Tin Pan Alley Cats'' ''WesternAnimation/TinPanAlleyCats'' -- 1943, directed by Creator/BobClampett. One of Literature/The100GreatestLooneyTunes.
30th Mar '16 1:27:14 PM OnGreenDolphinStreet
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* {{Blackface}}: Many jokes poke fun at black people, depicting them with enormous frog like lips, lazy or dimwitted behaviour and jive talk. Scenes of them eating water melons, stealing chickens, being scared of ghosts, obsessed with throwing dice and more are also rampant. Expect some imagery set in the days of slavery to turn up or jokes where their skin color turns out to be just black paint. Though a lot if it thrives on stereotypes that were typical of the time it must be said that this imagery was seen in many live-action films of that time period, including works with actual Afro-American actors and musicians like Music/LouisArmstrong, Stepin Fetchit, Hattie [=McDaniel=], Creator/JosephineBaker, and others. So, in some cases these jokes were meant as innocent parodies that modern audiences, unaware of the stuff referenced, will find offensive.

to:

* {{Blackface}}: Many jokes poke fun at black people, depicting them with enormous frog like lips, lazy or dimwitted behaviour and jive talk. Scenes of them eating water melons, stealing chickens, being scared of ghosts, obsessed with throwing dice and more are also rampant. Expect some imagery set in the days of slavery to turn up or jokes where their skin color turns out to be just black paint. Though a lot if it thrives on stereotypes that were typical of the time it must be said that this imagery was seen in many live-action films of that time period, including works with actual Afro-American actors and musicians like Music/LouisArmstrong, Stepin Fetchit, Hattie [=McDaniel=], Creator/JosephineBaker, Creator/JosephineBaker and others. So, in some cases these jokes were meant as innocent parodies that modern audiences, unaware of the stuff referenced, will find offensive.
30th Mar '16 1:26:54 PM OnGreenDolphinStreet
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* {{Blackface}}: Many jokes poke fun at black people, depicting them with enormous frog like lips, lazy or dimwitted behaviour and jive talk. Scenes of them eating water melons, stealing chickens, being scared of ghosts, obsessed with throwing dice,... are also rampant. Expect some imagery set in the days of slavery to turn up or jokes where their skin color turns out to be just black paint. Though a lot if it thrives on stereotypes that were typical of the time it must be said that this imagery was seen in many live-action films of that time period, including works with actual Afro-American actors and musicians like Music/LouisArmstrong, Stepin Fetchit, Hattie [=McDaniel=], Creator/JosephineBaker,... So, in some cases these jokes were meant as innocent parodies that modern audiences, unaware of the stuff referenced, will find offensive.

to:

* {{Blackface}}: Many jokes poke fun at black people, depicting them with enormous frog like lips, lazy or dimwitted behaviour and jive talk. Scenes of them eating water melons, stealing chickens, being scared of ghosts, obsessed with throwing dice,... dice and more are also rampant. Expect some imagery set in the days of slavery to turn up or jokes where their skin color turns out to be just black paint. Though a lot if it thrives on stereotypes that were typical of the time it must be said that this imagery was seen in many live-action films of that time period, including works with actual Afro-American actors and musicians like Music/LouisArmstrong, Stepin Fetchit, Hattie [=McDaniel=], Creator/JosephineBaker,...Creator/JosephineBaker, and others. So, in some cases these jokes were meant as innocent parodies that modern audiences, unaware of the stuff referenced, will find offensive.



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