History WMG / TheNeverendingStory

18th Apr '17 8:37:18 PM VanHohenheimOfXerxes
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* Creator/TerryGilliam
18th Apr '17 8:36:58 PM VanHohenheimOfXerxes
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* Creator/NeilGaiman
* Creator/HayaoMiyazaki
* Creator/DonBluth
6th Apr '17 4:24:48 PM drone5
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* Creator/PhilipPullman
14th Jan '17 11:51:06 PM Emperor_Oshron
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* Creator/JKRowling
9th Jan '17 9:43:53 PM TitoMosquito
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[[WMG: Former visitors to Fantasia]]
Besides Shakespeare.
* Creator/JRRTolkien
* Creator/CSLewis
* Creator/WaltDisney
* Creator/GeorgeLucas
* Creator/StevenSpielberg
* Creator/JimHenson
1st Sep '16 2:46:28 AM yellowukulele
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* Confirmed by the author [[https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Figuren_und_magische_Gegenst%C3%A4nde_in_der_Unendlichen_Geschichte#Die_Inschrift_.E2.80.9ETu.2C_was_du_willst.E2.80.9C in a text in his Nachlass]], with some bashing of the movie for good measure: ''"[...] der Satz ursprünglich aus dem Englischen stammt, und zwar von dem Schriftsteller Aleister Crowley (gestorben 1947), und dort heißt: ‚Do what thou wilt‘ (feierliches Kirchenenglisch). Das ‚Do what you dream!‘ ist Petersens Interpretation, und zwar die falsche. Es ist genau der Irrtum, dem auch Bastian unterliegt und um dessentwillen er aus Phantásien nicht mehr zurückfindet. Auch er meint zunächst, es ginge darum, zu tun, was man wünscht, ersehnt, gern möchte. Der Löwe Graógráman wird zornig, als Bastian ihm diese Deutung sagt. Seinen ‚Wahren Willen‘ finden, heißt ganz und gar nicht, zu tun, was man möchte. Diese Formel ‚Tu, was du willst!‘ geht über Rabelais bis zum Heiligen Augustin zurück."''

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* Confirmed by the author [[https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Figuren_und_magische_Gegenst%C3%A4nde_in_der_Unendlichen_Geschichte#Die_Inschrift_.org/wiki/Figuren_und_magische_Gegenstände_in_der_Unendlichen_Geschichte#Die_Inschrift_.E2.80.9ETu.2C_was_du_willst.E2.80.9C in a text in his Nachlass]], with some bashing of the movie for good measure: ''"[...] der Satz ursprünglich aus dem Englischen stammt, und zwar von dem Schriftsteller Aleister Crowley (gestorben 1947), und dort heißt: ‚Do what thou wilt‘ (feierliches Kirchenenglisch). Das ‚Do what you dream!‘ ist Petersens Interpretation, und zwar die falsche. Es ist genau der Irrtum, dem auch Bastian unterliegt und um dessentwillen er aus Phantásien nicht mehr zurückfindet. Auch er meint zunächst, es ginge darum, zu tun, was man wünscht, ersehnt, gern möchte. Der Löwe Graógráman wird zornig, als Bastian ihm diese Deutung sagt. Seinen ‚Wahren Willen‘ finden, heißt ganz und gar nicht, zu tun, was man möchte. Diese Formel ‚Tu, was du willst!‘ geht über Rabelais bis zum Heiligen Augustin zurück."''
1st Sep '16 2:42:05 AM yellowukulele
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The entire story is built around the desire to realize one's True Will through going through multitudes of inferior wishes that may help or hinder you in this search. The AURYN is inscribed with the words "Do what you wish", a variation of the Code of Thelema: "Do what thou Wilt, shall be whole of the Law". Like many unfamiliar with the philosophy, Bastian assumes it's a hedonistic command to do as you please, when its real purpose is to encourage you to find your deepest Wish, that is, your True Will. And Bastian's true wish at the end is to love and be loved, which mirrors how the Code continues: "Love is the Law, Love under Will". And finally, the name which Bastian gives to the Childlike Empress is Moon Child, which is almost certainly a direct reference to a novel and ritual by the same name from Aleister Crowley, the founder of the Thelemic faith. There are many other lesser parallels, but these are the most noticeable.

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The entire story is built around the desire to realize one's True Will through going through multitudes of inferior wishes that may help or hinder you in this search. The AURYN is inscribed with the words "Do what you wish", a variation of the Code of Thelema: "Do what thou Wilt, shall be whole of the Law". Like many unfamiliar with the philosophy, Bastian assumes it's a hedonistic command to do as you please, when its real purpose is to encourage you to find your deepest Wish, that is, your True Will. Will.
* Confirmed by the author [[https://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Figuren_und_magische_Gegenst%C3%A4nde_in_der_Unendlichen_Geschichte#Die_Inschrift_.E2.80.9ETu.2C_was_du_willst.E2.80.9C in a text in his Nachlass]], with some bashing of the movie for good measure: ''"[...] der Satz ursprünglich aus dem Englischen stammt, und zwar von dem Schriftsteller Aleister Crowley (gestorben 1947), und dort heißt: ‚Do what thou wilt‘ (feierliches Kirchenenglisch). Das ‚Do what you dream!‘ ist Petersens Interpretation, und zwar die falsche. Es ist genau der Irrtum, dem auch Bastian unterliegt und um dessentwillen er aus Phantásien nicht mehr zurückfindet. Auch er meint zunächst, es ginge darum, zu tun, was man wünscht, ersehnt, gern möchte. Der Löwe Graógráman wird zornig, als Bastian ihm diese Deutung sagt. Seinen ‚Wahren Willen‘ finden, heißt ganz und gar nicht, zu tun, was man möchte. Diese Formel ‚Tu, was du willst!‘ geht über Rabelais bis zum Heiligen Augustin zurück."''
And Bastian's true wish at the end is to love and be loved, which mirrors how the Code continues: "Love is the Law, Love under Will". And finally, the name which Bastian gives to the Childlike Empress is Moon Child, which is almost certainly a direct reference to a novel and ritual by the same name from Aleister Crowley, the founder of the Thelemic faith. There are many other lesser parallels, but these are the most noticeable.
27th Apr '16 8:03:34 PM Ingonyama
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[[WMG: Bastian's father is abusive]]]

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[[WMG: Bastian's father is abusive]]]abusive]]
27th Apr '16 8:02:15 PM Ingonyama
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* On the other hand, while he failed the test of being confident in his self-worth, he still passed a test of bravery by running through rather than simply freezing and letting them blast him, or fleeing back the way he came in cowardice. It's also a good and realistic way of showing heroes can be flawed and make mistakes, yet still be heroes and manage to win in the end.



and probably caused his wife's death, somehow. Bastian is a lot like his mother, so he gets a lot of abuse from his father. He reads books to escape thinking about it. Fantasia represents his childhood, memories of his mother, the things he likes in books, The Nothing is anxieties and fears, especially about growing up and living without his mother.

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...and probably caused his wife's death, somehow. Bastian is a lot like his mother, so he gets a lot of abuse from his father. He reads books to escape thinking about it. Fantasia represents his childhood, memories of his mother, the things he likes in books, The Nothing is anxieties and fears, especially about growing up and living without his mother.



* Gmork says that the Manipulators tell lies to humans to gain power over them - By stealing a human's time, the Grey Men gain absolute power over them, as Master Hora explains. They gain that power by distortinng the truth and make people believe their lies
* When falling victim to the manipulation, the people in The Neverending Story just as the citizens of the unnamed city in Momo loste their ability to dream and their happiness.

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* Gmork says that the Manipulators tell lies to humans to gain power over them - By stealing a human's time, the Grey Men gain absolute power over them, as Master Hora explains. They gain that power by distortinng distorting the truth and make people believe their lies
* When falling victim to the manipulation, the people in The Neverending Story just as the citizens of the unnamed city in Momo loste lost their ability to dream and their happiness.



* What metaphor? They all by tell you this point blank.

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* What metaphor? They all by but tell you this point blank.



During the Ivory Tower scene near the beginning of the first movie, you can JUST make out [[MickeyMouse Mickey Mouse]], Gumby and even a few [[StarWars Star Wars characters]] gathered in the small crowd atop the tower. At first glance, these seem to be little more than easter eggs the filmmakers snuck in for funsies. That is, up until you remember that Fantasia is the realm of Human Fantasy. As in, the realm of imagination and fiction. So while Mickey and Chewbacca weren't book characters, they were nonetheless in their own stories, and all stories are true in Fantasia.

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During the Ivory Tower scene near the beginning of the first movie, you can JUST make out [[MickeyMouse Mickey Mouse]], Gumby and even a few [[StarWars Star Wars characters]] gathered in the small crowd atop the tower. At first glance, these seem to be little more than easter eggs {{Easter Egg}}s the filmmakers snuck in for funsies. That is, up until you remember that Fantasia is the realm of Human Fantasy. As in, the realm of imagination and fiction. So while Mickey and Chewbacca weren't book characters, they were nonetheless in their own stories, and all stories are true in Fantasia.
24th Oct '15 8:54:43 PM Durison
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[[WMG: The Manipulators from the book are related to Nyarlathotep]]
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