History Videogame / YuGiOhForbiddenMemories

18th Jun '16 4:22:54 PM lalalei2001
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* AdaptedOut: Since the game was made before Battle City and the Ancient Egypt arcs were finalized, Marik and Thief King Bakura don't appear.
18th Jun '16 4:16:50 PM lalalei2001
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The game serves as an AlternateUniverse to the anime, with the BigBad being a different person, and many of Yugi's TrueCompanions making appearances as characters in Ancient Egypt. For all practical purposes, it can be seen as an early draft of the Ancient Egypt arc that had yet to start in the canon media at the time. It has two sequels, ''VideoGame/YuGiOhTheDuelistsOfTheRoses'' and ''VideoGame/YuGiOhTheFalseboundKingdom''.

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The game serves as an AlternateUniverse to the manga and anime, with the BigBad being a different person, and many of Yugi's TrueCompanions making appearances as characters in Ancient Egypt. For all practical purposes, it can be seen as an early draft of the Ancient Egypt arc that had yet to start in the canon media at the time. It has two sequels, ''VideoGame/YuGiOhTheDuelistsOfTheRoses'' and ''VideoGame/YuGiOhTheFalseboundKingdom''.



*** The Teana capture quest in general and subsequent Seto 2 duel. It happens after you beat two high mages, but you're not informed it happens, unless you go back to the dueling ground before defeating all the high mages. Additionally, if you beat all the high mages before saving Teana, going through this quest will advance straight to the endgame instead of the Seto 2 duel, leaving Seto 2 LostForever for Free Duel on that file until you beat it and start a NewGamePlus.
** When you beat the game, you're given a password at the end of the credits. You're given no information on what this password does, and it does not work if you try inputting it into the game. It's a password for ''VideoGame/YuGiOhTheDuelistsOfTheRoses''.

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*** The Teana capture quest in general and subsequent Seto 2 duel. It happens after you beat two high mages, but you're not informed it happens, happens unless you go back to the dueling ground before defeating all the high mages. Additionally, if you beat all the high mages before saving Teana, going through this quest will advance straight to the endgame instead of the Seto 2 duel, leaving Seto 2 LostForever for Free Duel on that file until you beat it and start a NewGamePlus.
** When you beat the game, you're given a password at the end of the credits. You're given no information on what this password does, and it does not work if you try inputting it into the game. It's a password for its sequel, ''VideoGame/YuGiOhTheDuelistsOfTheRoses''.



** ClippedWingAngel: [[spoiler:As [=NiteMare=], he has no magic, trap, nor equip cards in his deck, meaning once you gather the equips to make a monster stronger than the strongest monster he has, you'll have the duel won regardless of how badly you were getting beaten down.]]

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** ClippedWingAngel: [[spoiler:As [=NiteMare=], he has no magic, trap, nor or equip cards in his deck, meaning once you gather the equips to make have a monster stronger than the strongest monster one he has, you'll have the duel won regardless of how badly you were getting beaten down.beaten.]]



** RareRandomDrop: Some cards have ridiculously low drop rates in the game while only dropping from a single opponent or two, where unless you're particularly lucky, you will have to duel the opponent who drops them hundreds or even over a thousand times, just to get a single copy of the card.

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** * RareRandomDrop: Some cards have ridiculously low drop rates in the game while and only dropping drop from a single opponent one or two, where unless two opponents. Unless you're particularly lucky, you will have to duel the opponent who drops them hundreds or even over a thousand times, times just to get a single copy of the card.
5th Jun '16 12:01:56 AM lalalei2001
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* DiscOneFinalBoss: Kaiba, who is the final opponent in his tournament and thus the final opponent in the present arc. He's also the first opponent you have to beat that has a high chance of using a monster with 3000 attack (Pegasus and Isis before Kaiba can have 3000+ attack monsters in their deck, but it's rare for them to), and he has his own unique battle music.

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* DiscOneFinalBoss: Kaiba, who is the final opponent in his tournament and thus the final opponent in the present arc. He's also the first opponent you have to beat that has a high chance of using a monster with 3000 attack (Pegasus and Isis before Kaiba can have 3000+ attack monsters in their deck, but it's rare for them to), attack, and he has his own unique battle music.



* DittoFighter: In Free Duel, there's an opponent named Duel Master K that's available from the start, and is never seen in the campaign mode. His deck is a mirror copy of the player's deck. Generally seen as being there to teach players the possible fusions and combinations in their deck, as his card drops are terrible beyond early game standards.

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* DittoFighter: In Free Duel, there's an opponent named Duel Master K that's available from the start, and is never seen in the campaign mode. His deck is a mirror copy of the player's deck. Generally seen as being there to teach players the possible fusions and combinations in their deck, as his card drops are terrible beyond early game standards.



* EarlyInstallmentWeirdness: Gameplay wise, the rules of dueling are quite different from what they later became (such as, no tributing is needed to summon any monster card, fusions don't require a magic card to fuse and most fusions have general requirements rather than specific monsters, only one card can be played on the field at a time, you draw until you have five cards in your hand and you cannot skip a turn without playing a card, and there are several monsters that are ritual monsters in the game, that aren't ritual monsters in the card game).

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* EarlyInstallmentWeirdness: Gameplay wise, the rules of dueling are quite different from what they later became (such as, no became. No tributing is needed to summon any monster card, fusions don't require a magic card to fuse and most fusions have general requirements rather than specific monsters, only one card can be played on the field at a time, you draw until you have five cards in your hand and you cannot skip a turn without playing a card, and there are several monsters that are ritual monsters in the game, game that aren't ritual monsters in the card game). game.



* EverythingIsTryingToKillYou: Lose one duel in story mode (even against your friends), and it's game over; the only exception is the HopelessBossFight against Heishin.

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* EverythingIsTryingToKillYou: Lose one duel in story mode (even mode,even against your friends), friends, and it's game over; the over. The only exception is the HopelessBossFight against Heishin.
28th May '16 7:20:04 PM lalalei2001
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* TheUnfought: You don't get to fight Joey, Tea, or Ryou Bakura in the present day.
13th May '16 4:50:41 PM lalalei2001
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* AdamSmithHatesYourGuts: Want those powerful cards without cheating or just dueling a character to get it? Hope you're prepared to fight hundreds upon hundreds of duels to get the Starchips required to buy even a single card. The max amount of starchips you can get winning a duel is five, where any decent or useful card will cost hundreds or thousands of starchips. To make it more ridiculous, many cards cost 999,999 starchips, some of which you can't win from dueling.

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* AdamSmithHatesYourGuts: Want those powerful cards without cheating or just dueling a character to get it? Hope you're prepared to fight hundreds upon hundreds of duels to get the Starchips Star Chips required to buy even a single card. The max amount of starchips Star Chips you can get winning a duel is five, where any decent or useful card will cost hundreds or thousands of starchips. Star Chips. To make it more ridiculous, many cards cost 999,999 starchips, Star Chips, some of which you can't win from dueling.
20th Feb '16 11:21:16 AM lalalei2001
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The game is noteworthy for [[EarlyInstallmentWeirdness using gameplay rules vastly different from the actual card game]]. The game was released before the trading card game was, and as such, uses prototype rules that were originally considered for the TCG. Major differences include no tribute being necessary to summon level five and higher monsters, all monster cards being normal monster cards, only one card being placed on the field each turn, fusion being done without the card Polymerization, and the majority of the possible fusions not being actual fusions in the TCG. The game is additionally poorly balanced, with the vast majority of cards being monster cards, and the few magic and trap cards having simple effects that are [[UselessUsefulSpell usually not useful]] (while the few that are useful like [[OneHitPolykill Raigeki]] verge on being [[GameBreaker Game Breakers]]).

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The game is noteworthy for [[EarlyInstallmentWeirdness using gameplay rules vastly different from the actual card game]]. The game was released before the trading card game was, and as such, uses prototype rules that were originally considered for the TCG. Major differences include no tribute being necessary to summon level five and higher monsters, all monster cards being normal monster cards, only one card being placed on the field each turn, fusion being done without the card Polymerization, and the majority of the possible fusions not being actual fusions in the TCG. The game is additionally poorly balanced, with the vast majority of cards being monster cards, and the few magic and trap cards having simple effects that are [[UselessUsefulSpell usually not useful]] (while useful]], while the few ones that are ''are'' useful like [[OneHitPolykill Raigeki]] verge on being [[GameBreaker Game Breakers]]).
are nearly required to beat the game.



* AnimationBump: When attacking an opposing monster with your own, by pressing the square button, you can view a 3D battle sequence between the monsters. The 3D models of most monsters are seriously OffModel. Some of the more popular/noteworthy monsters had higher quality and more detailed models; compare the models of the [[http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-EvAQLdICses/UO7K1-SD5JI/AAAAAAAAAJg/3Ya9luTUPNo/s1600/Imagem1.png Blue-Eyes White Dragon]] and [[http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-4EUzNEoeqfU/UO7hsMNA3qI/AAAAAAAAAK0/kMzUivHZVXk/s1600/Imagem9.png Red-Eyes Black Dragon]] to the models of [[http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-XS8uqsmcCS4/UO7hcAnmKGI/AAAAAAAAAKs/1Il-I1dfvVY/s1600/Imagem8.png Tiger Axe]] and [[http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-1MJBIMU5urw/UO7vQRuUy-I/AAAAAAAAAMk/fo0wuiQnE_w/s1600/Imagem16.png Dragon Zombie]] for example.

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* AnimationBump: When attacking an opposing monster with your own, by pressing the square button, you can view a 3D battle sequence between the monsters. The 3D models of most monsters are seriously OffModel. Some of the more popular/noteworthy monsters had higher quality and more detailed models; compare the models of the [[http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-EvAQLdICses/UO7K1-SD5JI/AAAAAAAAAJg/3Ya9luTUPNo/s1600/Imagem1.png Blue-Eyes White Dragon]] and [[http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-4EUzNEoeqfU/UO7hsMNA3qI/AAAAAAAAAK0/kMzUivHZVXk/s1600/Imagem9.png Red-Eyes Black Dragon]] to the models of [[http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-XS8uqsmcCS4/UO7hcAnmKGI/AAAAAAAAAKs/1Il-I1dfvVY/s1600/Imagem8.png Tiger Axe]] and [[http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-1MJBIMU5urw/UO7vQRuUy-I/AAAAAAAAAMk/fo0wuiQnE_w/s1600/Imagem16.png Dragon Zombie]] for example.



* ChangingGameplayPriorities: Early on, the game favors hyper offense of getting powerful beatsticks out early, as well as quickly fusing into more powerful beatsticks such as [[InfinityMinusOneSword Twinheaded Thunderdragon]] to overpower your opponent. Once you get to the end of Kaiba's tournament, the game will require a good balance of both power and magic in order to get passed the mid-game. Once you get to the end game gantlet, though, expect to be playing a ''very'' defense oriented deck, often ones with a lot of traps to easily take out your opponents' beatsticks that vastly outclass anything you could reasonably summon in the entirety of the game.
* CoversAlwaysLie: Hey look the Pharaoh is holding up a Magician of Black Chaos, sure would be nice to get that card in the American version...oh wait.

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* ChangingGameplayPriorities: Early on, the game favors hyper offense of getting powerful beatsticks out early, as well as quickly fusing into more powerful beatsticks such as [[InfinityMinusOneSword Twinheaded Thunderdragon]] Thunder Dragon]] to overpower your opponent. Once you get to the end of Kaiba's tournament, the game will require a good balance of both power and magic in order to get passed past the mid-game. Once you get to the end game gantlet, though, expect to be playing a ''very'' defense oriented deck, often ones with a lot of traps to easily take out your opponents' beatsticks that vastly outclass anything you could reasonably summon in the entirety of the game.
summon.
* CoversAlwaysLie: Hey look the Pharaoh is holding up a Magician of Black Chaos, sure would be nice to get that card in the American version...oh wait.version. Too bad it was for the Pocket Station only.



* DiscOneNuke: The Twin-Headed Thunder Dragon fusion. To create one, all that is required is any Dragon type monster and any Thunder type monster, with one of them having an attack of 1600 or higher. The Twin-Head has an attack of 2800, strong enough to destroy all but 13 monsters in the game without equips, and is compatible with two field cards, as well as compatible with a variety of equip cards, making it easy to power up. With proper deck building around it, the Twin-Head can be reliably used to take on any monster outside the Blue Eyes Ultimate Dragon, and carry the player to the end game.

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* DiscOneNuke: The Twin-Headed Thunder Dragon fusion. To create one, all that is required is any Dragon type monster and any Thunder type monster, with one of them having an attack of 1600 or higher. The Twin-Head has an attack of 2800, strong enough to destroy all but 13 monsters in the game without equips, 2800 and is compatible with two field cards, as well as compatible with a variety of equip cards, making it easy to power up. With proper deck building around it, the Twin-Head can be reliably used to take on any monster outside of the Blue Eyes Ultimate Dragon, and carry the player to the end game.



* DoubleUnlock: Upon beating the game you're given one of several random passwords depending on the name you put for the file, which does not work in Forbidden Memories. The passwords are for ''VideoGame/YuGiOhTheDuelistsOfTheRoses'', where they're used to unlock powerful, gamebreaking cards.

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* DoubleUnlock: Upon beating the game you're given one of several random passwords depending on the name you put for the file, which does not work in Forbidden Memories. The passwords are for ''VideoGame/YuGiOhTheDuelistsOfTheRoses'', where they're used to unlock powerful, gamebreaking game breaking cards.



* HelloInsertNameHere: Although you are the Pharoah, this was made before his name was revealed in canon.

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* HelloInsertNameHere: Although you are the Pharoah, Pharaoh, this was made before his name was revealed in canon.



* InfinityPlusOneSword: The Meteor Black Dragon is by far the strongest monster card the player can obtain without cheating, with 3500 attack. While it doesn't have much equip versatility, it has the best possible alignments, with Mars allowing it to take out the Ultimate Great Moth without an equip, and Sun allowing it to take out the Gate Guardian without an equip, leaving the Blue-Eyes Ultimate Dragon and another Meteor Black Dragon as the only monsters it can't beat without equips. Obtaining it is actually not that difficult however, as you can obtain it from defeating the Meadow Mage, a rather easy opponent you can fight right after you win Kaiba's tournament and go back to the past.

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* InfinityPlusOneSword: The Meteor Black Dragon is by far the strongest monster card the player can obtain without cheating, with 3500 attack. While it doesn't have much equip versatility, it has the best possible alignments, with Mars allowing it to take out the Ultimate Great Moth without an equip, and Sun allowing it to take out the Gate Guardian without an equip, leaving the Blue-Eyes Ultimate Dragon and another Meteor Black Dragon as the only monsters it can't beat without equips. Obtaining it is actually not that difficult however, as you You can obtain it from defeating the Meadow Mage, a rather easy opponent you can fight right after you win Kaiba's tournament and go back to the past.
20th Feb '16 11:10:17 AM lalalei2001
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* TheGhost: The Prince's parents are mentioned, but never seen.
12th Feb '16 12:47:57 PM lalalei2001
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* ImpossibleItemDrop: The Meadow Mage, seemingly just another low-level mook before a high mage, inexplicably gives you the best card drops out of anyone in the game. The only way people ahve betaen the game is by grinding against him for cards.

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* ImpossibleItemDrop: The Meadow Mage, seemingly just another low-level mook before a high mage, inexplicably gives you the best card drops out of anyone in the game. The only way people ahve betaen have beaten the game is by grinding against him for cards.
23rd Jan '16 12:57:31 AM lalalei2001
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* AnimationBump: When attacking an opposing monster with your own, by pressing the square button, you can view a 3D battle sequence between the monsters. The 3D models of most monsters are atrocious however and are seriously OffModel. Some of the more popular/noteworthy monsters though had clearly more attention paid to making their models higher quality and more detailed; compare the models of the [[http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-EvAQLdICses/UO7K1-SD5JI/AAAAAAAAAJg/3Ya9luTUPNo/s1600/Imagem1.png Blue-Eyes White Dragon]] and [[http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-4EUzNEoeqfU/UO7hsMNA3qI/AAAAAAAAAK0/kMzUivHZVXk/s1600/Imagem9.png Red-Eyes Black Dragon]] to the models of [[http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-XS8uqsmcCS4/UO7hcAnmKGI/AAAAAAAAAKs/1Il-I1dfvVY/s1600/Imagem8.png Tiger Axe]] and [[http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-1MJBIMU5urw/UO7vQRuUy-I/AAAAAAAAAMk/fo0wuiQnE_w/s1600/Imagem16.png Dragon Zombie]] for example.

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* AnimationBump: When attacking an opposing monster with your own, by pressing the square button, you can view a 3D battle sequence between the monsters. The 3D models of most monsters are atrocious however and are seriously OffModel. Some of the more popular/noteworthy monsters though had clearly more attention paid to making their models higher quality and more detailed; detailed models; compare the models of the [[http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-EvAQLdICses/UO7K1-SD5JI/AAAAAAAAAJg/3Ya9luTUPNo/s1600/Imagem1.png Blue-Eyes White Dragon]] and [[http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-4EUzNEoeqfU/UO7hsMNA3qI/AAAAAAAAAK0/kMzUivHZVXk/s1600/Imagem9.png Red-Eyes Black Dragon]] to the models of [[http://1.bp.blogspot.com/-XS8uqsmcCS4/UO7hcAnmKGI/AAAAAAAAAKs/1Il-I1dfvVY/s1600/Imagem8.png Tiger Axe]] and [[http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-1MJBIMU5urw/UO7vQRuUy-I/AAAAAAAAAMk/fo0wuiQnE_w/s1600/Imagem16.png Dragon Zombie]] for example.



** If you have a face-up monster on your side of the field while the AI has no monsters, they will always play a single monster card, regardless of if their monster is too weak and a magic card in their hand could wipe out all of their opponent's monsters, there exists a fusion in their hand, or if they have a equip they could combine with their monster to strengthen it enough to defeat your monsters. This can be exploited to ensure your opponent does not fuse on you, does not equip their monsters, and prevent them from using magic/trap cards.
*** The one exception to this is the low field mages, who will always use the magic card to change the field type to match their specialty if it's in their hand and the field is currently something else, even if doing so means that they will be left with no monsters to defend them and you have enough attack power on the field to finish them off.

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** If you have a face-up monster on your side of the field while the AI has no monsters, they will always play a single monster card, regardless of if their monster is too weak and a magic card in their hand could wipe out all of their opponent's monsters, there exists a fusion in their hand, or if they have a equip they could combine with their monster to strengthen it enough to defeat your monsters. the situation. This can be exploited to ensure your opponent does not fuse on you, does not equip their monsters, and prevent prevents them from using magic/trap cards.
***
cards. The one exception to this is the low field mages, who will always use the magic card to change the field type to match their specialty if it's in their hand and the field is currently something else, even if doing so means that they will be left with no monsters to defend them and you have enough attack power on the field to finish them off.themselves.



** If the AI's monsters are not strong enough to destroy any monsters on your field, they'll always switch them to defense (the exception being the aforementioned 3000+ monsters). They'll even do this if the monster of yours they're unable to destroy has the same attack as the strongest monster on their field, while having lower defense (thus allowing your monster to safely destroy their equal in attack monster).
** The AI will also always switch their monsters into defense when they're bluffed into not attacking your facedown monster, regardless of their monsters' defense values (again unless it's one of the aforementioned 3000+ attack monsters). This can be exploited to defeat high attack, low defense monsters (such as Summoned Skull and Jirai Gumo), that you would be unable to destroy otherwise.

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** If the AI's monsters are not strong enough to destroy any monsters on your field, they'll always switch them to defense (the exception being the aforementioned 3000+ monsters). They'll even do this if the monster of yours they're unable to destroy has the same attack as the strongest monster on their field, while having lower defense (thus allowing your monster to safely destroy their equal in attack monster).
defense.
** The AI will also always switch their monsters into defense when they're bluffed into not attacking your facedown monster, regardless of their monsters' defense values (again unless (unless it's one of the aforementioned a 3000+ attack monsters). monster). This can be exploited to defeat high attack, low defense monsters (such as Summoned Skull and Jirai Gumo), that you would be unable to destroy otherwise.



** Ritual cards can be used to summon very powerful monsters you otherwise wouldn't have access to without cheating, with an extravagant animation for the summoning process. However, each ritual card requires three specific monsters on your field to work (which is usually a GuideDangIt to know what the required monsters are for each ritual), and most of these required monsters are too weak to keep alive long enough without significant magic/trap assistance (along with the fact that these monsters are dead weight without the ritual). The ritual monsters themselves are also usually not that much more powerful than more conventionally obtained monsters or are even flatout weaker (especially compared to the [[DiscOneNuke Twin-Headed Thunder Dragon]] and [[InfinityPlusOneSword Meteor Black Dragon]]). Rituals overall are too inflexible and time-consuming to be utilised in a practical manner, while fusion and equipping work much more effectively and faster for getting stronger monsters out. Plus if you could actually get a ritual to successfully work, you almost certainly already had the duel in your complete control and would have won anyway without it.
** A lot of trap and non-equip magic cards for that matter, since you can only play one card per-turn, regardless if it's a monster, magic, or trap. A lot of the time, the turn you use to place a trap or magic card could have been better used setting up a far more powerful monster to deter the A.I. from attacking, which is especially true if the A.I. currently has more monsters on the field. While their are some exceptions (Widespread Ruin, which destroys any monster that attacks, regardless of its ATK, and Raigeki, which nukes the opponents entire monster field, and possibly a few field spells as well) generally, if you're doing well enough that you can set them on the field, you likely could have won without them regardless. As such, during the times you're still setting up, they often end up becoming dead weight and taking up precious space in your hand. [[note]][[NintendoHard This does not apply in the end game though, where the opponents monster ATK will greatly outweigh anything you can legitimately get.]] You ''will'' need those cards for that part of the game.[[/note]]

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** Ritual cards can be used to summon very powerful monsters you otherwise wouldn't have access to without cheating, with an extravagant animation for the summoning process. However, each ritual card requires three specific monsters on your field to work (which is usually a GuideDangIt to know what the required monsters are for each ritual), and most of these required monsters are too weak to keep alive long enough without significant magic/trap assistance (along with the fact that these monsters are dead weight without the ritual). assistance. The ritual monsters themselves are also usually not that much more powerful than more conventionally obtained monsters or are even flatout weaker (especially compared to the [[DiscOneNuke Twin-Headed Thunder Dragon]] and [[InfinityPlusOneSword Meteor Black Dragon]]). weaker. Rituals overall are too inflexible and time-consuming to be utilised utilized in a practical manner, while fusion and equipping work much more effectively and faster for getting stronger monsters out. Plus if you could actually get a ritual to successfully work, you almost certainly already had the duel in your complete control and would have won anyway without it.
out.
** A lot of trap and non-equip magic cards for that matter, cards, since you can only play one card per-turn, regardless if it's a monster, magic, or trap. A lot of the time, the turn you use to place a trap or magic card could have been better used setting up a far more powerful monster to deter the A.I. from attacking, which is especially true if the A.I. currently has more monsters on the field. While their are some exceptions (Widespread Ruin, which destroys any monster that attacks, regardless of its ATK, and Raigeki, which nukes the opponents entire monster field, and possibly a few field spells as well) generally, if you're doing well enough that you can set them on the field, you likely could have won without them regardless. As such, during the times you're still setting up, they often end up becoming dead weight and taking up precious space in your hand. [[note]][[NintendoHard This does not apply in the end game though, where the opponents monster ATK will greatly outweigh anything you can legitimately get.]] get. You ''will'' need those cards for that part of the game.[[/note]]



* ButThouMust: There are a few instances in the Campaign where you're given a "choice" on what action to take in a confrontation (such as after losing to Heishin in the [[HopelessBossFight first duel against him]], whether to shatter the Millennium Puzzle or not), but the game requires you to pick a specific option to progress the story and not choosing it will just result in a character prodding you to pick that required choice until you do it. Averted with the initial choice to sneak out and enjoy the festival - you can just give up when Simon catches you and skip the first act of the game.
* ChangingGameplayPriorities: Early on, the game favors hyper offense of getting powerful beatsticks out early, as well as quickly fusing into more powerful beatsticks such as [[InfinityMinusOneSword Twinheaded Thunderdragon]] to overpower your opponent. Once you get to the end of Kaiba's tournament, the game will require a good balance of both power and magic in order to get passed the mid-game. Once you get to the end game gantlet, though, expect to be playing a ''very'' defense oriented deck, often ones with a lot of traps to easily take out your opponents beatsticks that vastly outclass anything you could reasonably summon in the entirity of the game.

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* ButThouMust: There are a few instances in the Campaign where you're given a "choice" on what action to take in a confrontation (such as after losing to Heishin in the [[HopelessBossFight first duel against him]], whether to shatter the Millennium Puzzle or not), confrontation, but the game requires you to pick a specific option to progress the story and not choosing it will just result in a character prodding you to pick that required choice until you do it. Averted with the initial choice to sneak out and enjoy the festival - you festival. You can just give up when Simon catches you and skip the first act of the game.
* ChangingGameplayPriorities: Early on, the game favors hyper offense of getting powerful beatsticks out early, as well as quickly fusing into more powerful beatsticks such as [[InfinityMinusOneSword Twinheaded Thunderdragon]] to overpower your opponent. Once you get to the end of Kaiba's tournament, the game will require a good balance of both power and magic in order to get passed the mid-game. Once you get to the end game gantlet, though, expect to be playing a ''very'' defense oriented deck, often ones with a lot of traps to easily take out your opponents opponents' beatsticks that vastly outclass anything you could reasonably summon in the entirity entirety of the game.



* CrutchCharacter: Pretty much all the fusions besides the [[DiscOneNuke Twin-Headed Thunder Dragon]] and [[InfinityPlusOneSword Meteor Black Dragon]] fusions, in particular the Mystical Sand, Flame Cerberus, and to a lesser extent, Crimson Sunbird fusions. Mystical Sand (2100 attack) is made from the fusion of any female and rock monster, while the Flame Cerberus (2100 attack) is made from any beast and fire-alignment monster, and Crimson Sunbird (2300 attack) from any winged-beast and fire-alignment monster with one having at least 1300 attack. These fusions are really easy to do, and fusion fodder for them will be in your starter deck and is easily obtained in the early game. However, while these monsters will win you duels single-handily in the early game and reliably carry you in Kaiba's preliminaries, they begin tapering off in the finals of Kaiba's tournament, become only useful as a supplemental force against the mages, and fusing for them will be a waste of space in the endgame. So while you can load up your deck with fusion fodder for them early on and have success, you're going to have to start moving your deck towards facilitating the Twin-Head fusion, monsters that are decently strong at base, and equips that work with them, by the time you get to the tournament finals.

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* CrutchCharacter: Pretty much all the fusions besides the [[DiscOneNuke Twin-Headed Thunder Dragon]] and [[InfinityPlusOneSword Meteor Black Dragon]] fusions, in particular the Mystical Sand, Flame Cerberus, and to a lesser extent, Crimson Sunbird fusions. Mystical Sand (2100 attack) is made from the fusion of any female and rock monster, while the Flame Cerberus (2100 attack) is made from any beast and fire-alignment monster, and Crimson Sunbird (2300 attack) from any winged-beast and fire-alignment monster with one having at least 1300 attack. These fusions are really easy to do, and fusion fodder for them will be in your starter deck and is easily obtained in the early game. However, while these monsters will win you duels single-handily in the early game and reliably carry you in Kaiba's preliminaries, they They begin tapering off in the finals of Kaiba's tournament, become only useful as a supplemental force against the mages, and fusing for them will be a waste of space in the endgame. So while you can load up your deck with fusion fodder for them early on and have success, you're going to have to start moving your deck towards facilitating the Twin-Head fusion, monsters that are decently strong at base, and equips that work with them, by the time you get to the tournament finals.endgame.



* DiscOneNuke: The Twin-Headed Thunder Dragon fusion. To create one, all that is required is any Dragon type monster and any Thunder type monster, with one of them having an attack of 1600 or higher, which the ingredients to making such can be gotten in your starter deck or otherwise easily obtained from dueling. The Twin-Head has an attack of 2800, strong enough to destroy all but 13 monsters in the game without equips, and is compatible with two field cards, as well as compatible with a variety of equip cards, making it easy to power up. With proper deck building around it, the Twin-Head can be reliably used to take on any monster outside the Blue Eyes Ultimate Dragon, and carry the player to the end game.

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* DiscOneNuke: The Twin-Headed Thunder Dragon fusion. To create one, all that is required is any Dragon type monster and any Thunder type monster, with one of them having an attack of 1600 or higher, which the ingredients to making such can be gotten in your starter deck or otherwise easily obtained from dueling.higher. The Twin-Head has an attack of 2800, strong enough to destroy all but 13 monsters in the game without equips, and is compatible with two field cards, as well as compatible with a variety of equip cards, making it easy to power up. With proper deck building around it, the Twin-Head can be reliably used to take on any monster outside the Blue Eyes Ultimate Dragon, and carry the player to the end game.



** The cards in the game will also be this to non-Japanese players, as many of the cards were really early cards released in the OCG that didn't get released outside Japan until many years later, or in the case of some, still never been officially released, thus international players are unlikely to recognise much of the game's card library. Even the game's famed Meteor Black Dragon didn't get officially released outside Japan until 2012, 12 years after the game's Japanese release and 10 years after its localization.

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** The cards in the game will also be this to non-Japanese players, as many of the cards were really early cards released in the OCG that didn't get released outside Japan until many years later, or in the case of some, still never been officially released, thus international players are unlikely to recognise recognize much of the game's card library. Even the game's famed Meteor Black Dragon didn't get officially released outside Japan until 2012, 12 years after the game's Japanese release and 10 years after its localization.



** The correct path to traverse the labyrinth when rescuing Teana (which is [[spoiler: right, right, left, right]]). While it isn't too complicated for one to reasonably figure out on their own, there is no indication that you encounter the Labyrinth Mage if you go the wrong path instead of the right path, and there's no indication that going the wrong path brings you back to the beginning. As such, this has left players uninformed of this to be stuck here dueling the Labyrinth Mage over and over not knowing what to do.
*** The Teana capture quest in general and subsequent Seto 2 duel. It happens after you beat two high mages, but you're not informed it happens (nor given any sort of hint about it), unless you go back to the dueling ground before defeating all the high mages, which you have no obligation to do after finding it for the first time and have no incentive to once you already defeated Teana and Jono 2 to get them available on Free Duel. Additionally, if you beat all the high mages before saving Teana, going through this quest will advance straight to the endgame instead of the Seto 2 duel, leaving Seto 2 LostForever for Free Duel on that file until you beat it and start a NewGamePlus (as well as making the endgame boss rush more difficult by adding the Labyrinth Mage to it).
** When you beat the game, you're given a password at the end of the credits. You're given no information on what this password does, and it does not work if you try inputting it into the game. It turns out it's the first part of a DoubleUnlock, for ''a future game'' (where it's a password for Yu-Gi-Oh! The Duelists of the Roses).

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** The correct path to traverse the labyrinth when rescuing Teana (which Teana, which is [[spoiler: right, right, left, right]]). right]]. While it isn't too complicated for one to reasonably figure out on their own, there is no indication that you encounter the Labyrinth Mage if you go the wrong path instead of the right path, and there's no indication that going the wrong path brings you back to the beginning. As such, this has left players uninformed of this to be stuck here dueling the Labyrinth Mage over and over not knowing what to do.
beginning.
*** The Teana capture quest in general and subsequent Seto 2 duel. It happens after you beat two high mages, but you're not informed it happens (nor given any sort of hint about it), happens, unless you go back to the dueling ground before defeating all the high mages, which you have no obligation to do after finding it for the first time and have no incentive to once you already defeated Teana and Jono 2 to get them available on Free Duel. mages. Additionally, if you beat all the high mages before saving Teana, going through this quest will advance straight to the endgame instead of the Seto 2 duel, leaving Seto 2 LostForever for Free Duel on that file until you beat it and start a NewGamePlus (as well as making the endgame boss rush more difficult by adding the Labyrinth Mage to it).
NewGamePlus.
** When you beat the game, you're given a password at the end of the credits. You're given no information on what this password does, and it does not work if you try inputting it into the game. It turns out it's the first part of a DoubleUnlock, for ''a future game'' (where it's It's a password for Yu-Gi-Oh! The Duelists of the Roses).''VideoGame/YuGiOhTheDuelistsOfTheRoses''.



* HopelessBossFight: The first time you duel Heishin, where he'll be using endgame-caliber cards while you still have your starter deck and maybe some other earlygame cards. If you defeat him, he'll rematch you until you lose. This is also the only duel in Campaign that you are allowed to lose (and Heishin is the only opponent you get in Free Duel without having to beat him in Campaign).

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* HopelessBossFight: The first time you duel Heishin, where he'll be using endgame-caliber cards while you still have your starter deck and maybe some other earlygame cards.deck. If you defeat him, he'll rematch you until you lose. This is also the only duel in Campaign that you are allowed to lose (and Heishin is the only opponent you get in Free Duel without having to beat him in Campaign).lose.



* ImpossibleItemDrop: The Meadow Mage, seemingly just another low-level mook before a high mage, that specialises in warrior type monsters and associated cards, would be assumed to give you warrior-related cards that are slightly better than mediocre at best. However, he instead inexplicably gives you the best card drops out of anyone in the game. Once you defeat him in campaign, run off and grind against him in Free Duel. You're going to need those Meteor Black Dragons and Skull Knights to complete the game.

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* ImpossibleItemDrop: The Meadow Mage, seemingly just another low-level mook before a high mage, that specialises in warrior type monsters and associated cards, would be assumed to give you warrior-related cards that are slightly better than mediocre at best. However, he instead inexplicably gives you the best card drops out of anyone in the game. Once you defeat him in campaign, run off and grind The only way people ahve betaen the game is by grinding against him in Free Duel. You're going to need those Meteor Black Dragons and Skull Knights to complete the game.for cards.



* InfinityPlusOneSword: The Meteor Black Dragon. It is by far the strongest monster card the player can obtain without cheating, with 3500 attack. While it doesn't have much equip versatility, it has the best possible alignments, with Mars allowing it to take out the Ultimate Great Moth without an equip, and Sun allowing it to take out the Gate Guardian without an equip, leaving the Blue-Eyes Ultimate Dragon and another Meteor Black Dragon as the only monsters it can't beat without equips. Obtaining it is actually not that difficult however, as you can obtain it from defeating the Meadow Mage, a rather easy opponent you can fight right after you win Kaiba's tournament and go back to the past. This is very fortunate for the player, as the Meteor Black Dragon is pretty much required for the player to [[NintendoHard reliably get through the end game without significant luck]].

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* InfinityPlusOneSword: The Meteor Black Dragon. It Dragon is by far the strongest monster card the player can obtain without cheating, with 3500 attack. While it doesn't have much equip versatility, it has the best possible alignments, with Mars allowing it to take out the Ultimate Great Moth without an equip, and Sun allowing it to take out the Gate Guardian without an equip, leaving the Blue-Eyes Ultimate Dragon and another Meteor Black Dragon as the only monsters it can't beat without equips. Obtaining it is actually not that difficult however, as you can obtain it from defeating the Meadow Mage, a rather easy opponent you can fight right after you win Kaiba's tournament and go back to the past. This is very fortunate for the player, as the Meteor Black Dragon is pretty much required for the player to [[NintendoHard reliably get through the end game without significant luck]].



* InfinityPlusOneElement: The Dragon type are clearly the game's favored type; dragons are the game's most powerful monsters on average, with the strongest being a dragon, over half of the monsters with 3000+ attack being dragons, and many other dragons having stats over 2000, with the dragons having a variety of alignments rather than the single alignment or two monsters of other types tend to generally have. They additionally have better fusion capabilities than every other type, with any dragon + almost any other type being a working fusion for a powerful dragon, and they have the aforementioned Twin-Headed Thunder Dragon fusion among their general fusions, by far the game's best general fusion. This means dragons will be extremely valuable right from the beginning, and will be the player's main attacking force throughout the game. They also tend to have [[AnimationBump much better 3D models]] in the 3D battle sequences than the monsters of other types, who usually have models that look like something out of an early [=PS1=] game. The only real detriment they have is all pure dragons ("dragons" of another type like the Twin-Head aren't affected) with a stat over 2100, besides the Kaiser Dragon and Harpie's Pet Dragon, only being compatible with Dragon Treasure and the aforementioned universal equips for their equip compatibility (and in the case of the Meteor Black Dragon, only those three plus Salamandra).

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* InfinityPlusOneElement: The Dragon type are clearly the game's favored type; dragons Dragons are the game's most powerful monsters on average, with the strongest being a dragon, over half of the monsters with 3000+ having high attack being dragons, and many other dragons having stats over 2000, with the dragons having a variety of alignments rather than the single alignment or two monsters of other types tend to generally have. alignments. They additionally have better fusion capabilities than every other type, with any dragon + almost any other type being a working fusion for a powerful dragon, and they have the aforementioned Twin-Headed Thunder Dragon fusion among their general fusions, by far the game's best general fusion.type. This means dragons will be extremely valuable right from the beginning, and will be the player's main attacking force throughout the game. They also tend to have [[AnimationBump much better 3D models]] in the 3D battle sequences than the monsters sequences. Their few downsides are a lack of other types, who usually have models that look like something out of an early [=PS1=] game. The only real detriment they have is all pure dragons ("dragons" of another type like the Twin-Head aren't affected) with equipment variety and a stat over 2100, besides the Kaiser weakness to Dragon and Harpie's Pet Dragon, only being compatible with Dragon Treasure and the aforementioned universal equips for their equip compatibility (and in the case of the Meteor Black Dragon, only those three plus Salamandra).Capture Jar.



** The opponent not having enough cards in their deck to draw a full hand of five cards. Since the player always goes first, the only way for the player to win by this method would be to exploit the AI into doing more fusion/card combining than themselves. It's almost never practical to win this way normally however, as over 99% of duels will be won or lost long before it can come into play (unless you're intentionally trying to get a S/A-Tec rank to get better magic/trap cards, in which case this becomes the most practical manner to try winning by).
** A player having all five pieces of Exodia in their hand. It is impossible to win this way without cheating however, since Exodia's legs cannot be won and cost 999,999 starchips each. A few of the opponents have access to all the Exodia pieces, but it is extremely rare for them to use all of them and get them all in their hand to win this way.

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** The opponent not having enough cards in their deck to draw a full hand of five cards. Since the player always goes first, the only way for the player to win by this method would be to exploit the AI into doing more fusion/card combining than themselves. It's almost never practical to win Winning in this way normally however, as over 99% of duels will be won or lost long before it can come into play (unless you're intentionally trying to get a S/A-Tec rank to get better magic/trap cards, in which case this becomes the most practical manner to try winning by).
results in an automatic S-Tec.
** A player having all five pieces of Exodia in their hand. It is impossible to win this way without cheating however, cheating, since Exodia's legs cannot be won and cost 999,999 starchips each. A few of the opponents have access to all the Exodia pieces, but it is extremely rare for them to use all of them and get them all in their hand to win this way.



* LastLousyPoint: There are several obscure cards in the game that are not that useful, but have incredibly low drop rates, and are usually obtainable from only a single specific opponent that you won't duel often because of their poor/mediocre card drops. Those striving to [[OneHundredPercentCompletion obtain every card in the game]] must then duel these neglected opponents extensively to win just one of these lousy cards. This is all for naught though, as unless you have the original Japanese version and a Pocket Station, there are many other cards that you cannot legitimately obtain.

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* LastLousyPoint: There are several obscure cards in the game that are not that useful, but have incredibly low drop rates, and are usually obtainable from only a single specific opponent that you won't duel often because of their poor/mediocre card drops. Those striving to [[OneHundredPercentCompletion obtain every card in the game]] must then duel these neglected opponents extensively to win just one of these lousy cards. This is all for naught though, as unless Unless you have the original Japanese version and a Pocket Station, there are many other cards that you cannot legitimately obtain.



* LostForever: The optional opponents have a specific timeframe in which you can duel them, and if you progress in Campaign beyond this timeframe, you'll be unable to go back and duel them for the rest of the Campaign (thus leaving them permanently unavailable for Free Duel unless you beat the game and go back through Campaign to play them).

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* LostForever: The optional opponents have a specific timeframe in which you can duel them, and if you progress in Campaign beyond this timeframe, you'll be unable to go back and duel them for the rest of the Campaign (thus leaving them permanently unavailable for Free Duel unless you beat the game and go back through Campaign to play them).Campaign.



* MissingSecret: There are many cards in the game that you see opponents use, that have the impossible 999,999 starchip cost to buy, and that you just never seem to win from dueling. Turns out, these cards are not among the drop lists for any opponent in the game, and that you were intended to obtain these cards through features from playing on a Pocket Station. Since the Pocket Station was [[NoExportForYou never released outside Japan]], these features were removed altogether in international releases and are impossible to obtain without cheating.

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* MissingSecret: There are many cards in the game that you see opponents use, that have the impossible 999,999 starchip cost to buy, and that you just never seem to win from dueling. Turns out, these These cards are not among the drop lists for any opponent in the game, and that you were intended to obtain these cards through features from playing on a Pocket Station. Since the Pocket Station was [[NoExportForYou never released outside Japan]], these features were removed altogether in international releases and are impossible to obtain without cheating.



* PeninsulaOfPowerLeveling: The Meadow Mage is the game's most notorious example, dropping many especially powerful cards at shockingly high rates, including the Meteor Black Dragon as previously covered. '''Everyone''' who beat the game did so after some really extensive grinding against him. As such, any guide will tell you the instant you return to the past, to duel the Meadow Mage asap and then leave to duel him a ton in Free Duel.
** [[HopelessBossFight Heishin]] becomes available in Free Duel after you duel him in Campaign, meaning you'll have access to him early in the game, and as expected, he drops some really powerful cards; in fact he has the second best card drops in the game after the Meadow Mage and drops many endgame-caliber cards that the Meadow Mage doesn't. As soon as the player's deck gets good enough to start getting wins against Heishin, he becomes a very valuable grinding target.
** Pegasus when S-Tecing him; during S/A Tec ranked duels, he drops Widespread Ruin, [[InfinityMinusOneSword Bright Castle]], and most importantly, [[InfinityPlusOneSword Megamorph]]. He additionally drops the latter two at a higher rate than anyone else, especially Megamorph, which he drops at a 1/32 rate, while the much more difficult Heishin drops it at a measly 1/1024 rate and [=DarkNite=] drops it at a 3/128 rate (who also can only be played in Free Duel after beating the game).

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* PeninsulaOfPowerLeveling: The Meadow Mage is the game's most notorious example, dropping many especially powerful cards at shockingly high rates, including the Meteor Black Dragon as previously covered. '''Everyone''' who beat the game did so after some really extensive grinding against him. As such, any guide will tell you the instant you return to the past, to duel the Meadow Mage asap and then leave to duel him a ton in Free Duel.
him.
** [[HopelessBossFight Heishin]] becomes available in Free Duel after you duel him in Campaign, meaning you'll have access to him early in the game, and as expected, he drops some really powerful cards; in fact he game. He has the second best card drops in the game after the Meadow Mage and drops many endgame-caliber cards that the Meadow Mage doesn't. As soon as the player's deck gets good enough to start getting wins against Heishin, he becomes a very valuable grinding target.
** Pegasus when S-Tecing him; during S/A Tec ranked duels, he drops Widespread Ruin, [[InfinityMinusOneSword Bright Castle]], and most importantly, [[InfinityPlusOneSword Megamorph]]. He additionally drops the latter two at a higher rate than anyone else, especially Megamorph, which he drops at a 1/32 rate, while the much more difficult Heishin drops it at a measly 1/1024 rate and [=DarkNite=] drops it at a 3/128 rate (who also can only be played in Free Duel after beating the game).Megamorph.



* TheComputerIsACheatingBastard: Some opponents (Pegasus, Heishin, [[spoiler: [=Seto 3=], and [=Darknite/Nitemare=]]]) are able to read what cards you have face down on the field, and thus can't be bluffed into not attacking your weaker monster/bluffed into attacking your stronger monster. Your opponents also have complete access to the cards you cannot legitimately obtain, and can morph cards they draw into other cards in their deck (which is why opponents will nearly always have multiples of their strongest monster on the first turn, and will play progressively weaker cards as the duel goes on).

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* TheComputerIsACheatingBastard: Some opponents (Pegasus, Heishin, [[spoiler: [=Seto 3=], and [=Darknite/Nitemare=]]]) are able to read what cards you have face down on the field, and thus can't be bluffed into not attacking your weaker monster/bluffed into attacking your stronger monster. Your opponents also have complete access to the cards you cannot legitimately obtain, and can morph cards they draw into other cards in their deck (which is why opponents will nearly always have multiples of their strongest monster on the first turn, and will play progressively weaker cards as the duel goes on).deck.



* WakeUpCallBoss: Pegasus, who is the seventh opponent in Kaiba's tournament, dueled in the quarterfinals. He is a significant step up from prior opponents, with powerful magic/trap cards, good equips, monsters with 2000+ attack, and the capability to create powerful fusions (particularly the Crimson Sunbird and Twin Headed Thunder Dragon). He is also the only opponent not in the endgame to be able to see your facedown cards, and if the player is unlucky, he may even play a Meteor Black Dragon. He is likely to be the first serious roadblock in a player's progress, and if it hasn't been done already, will drive it in to the player that grinding is an absolute necessity in this game, as well as knowing what you're doing when playing. The opponents to come provide similar difficulty, keeping him from being ThatOneBoss.

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* WakeUpCallBoss: Pegasus, who is the seventh opponent in Kaiba's tournament, dueled in the quarterfinals. He is a significant step up from prior opponents, with powerful magic/trap cards, good equips, monsters with 2000+ attack, and the capability to create powerful fusions (particularly the Crimson Sunbird and Twin Headed Thunder Dragon).fusions. He is also the only opponent not in the endgame to be able to see your facedown cards, and if the player is unlucky, he may even play a Meteor Black Dragon. He is likely to be the first serious roadblock in a player's progress, and if it hasn't been done already, will drive it in to the player that grinding is an absolute necessity in this game, as well as knowing what you're doing when playing. The opponents to come provide similar difficulty, keeping him from being ThatOneBoss.
9th Jan '16 10:38:54 AM erforce
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* InfinityPlusOneElement: The Dragon type are clearly the game's favored type; dragons are the game's most powerful monsters on average, with the strongest being a dragon, over half of the monsters with 3000+ attack being dragons, and many other dragons having stats over 2000, with the dragons having a variety of alignments rather than the single alignment or two monsters of other types tend to generally have. They additionally have better fusion capabilities than every other type, with any dragon + almost any other type being a working fusion for a powerful dragon, and they have the aforementioned Twin-Headed Thunder Dragon fusion among their general fusions, by far the game's best general fusion. This means dragons will be extremely valuable right from the beginning, and will be the player's main attacking force throughout the game. They also tend to have [[AnimationBump much better 3D models]] in the 3D battle sequences than the monsters of other types, who usually have models that look like something out of an early PS1 game. The only real detriment they have is all pure dragons ("dragons" of another type like the Twin-Head aren't affected) with a stat over 2100, besides the Kaiser Dragon and Harpie's Pet Dragon, only being compatible with Dragon Treasure and the aforementioned universal equips for their equip compatibility (and in the case of the Meteor Black Dragon, only those three plus Salamandra).

to:

* InfinityPlusOneElement: The Dragon type are clearly the game's favored type; dragons are the game's most powerful monsters on average, with the strongest being a dragon, over half of the monsters with 3000+ attack being dragons, and many other dragons having stats over 2000, with the dragons having a variety of alignments rather than the single alignment or two monsters of other types tend to generally have. They additionally have better fusion capabilities than every other type, with any dragon + almost any other type being a working fusion for a powerful dragon, and they have the aforementioned Twin-Headed Thunder Dragon fusion among their general fusions, by far the game's best general fusion. This means dragons will be extremely valuable right from the beginning, and will be the player's main attacking force throughout the game. They also tend to have [[AnimationBump much better 3D models]] in the 3D battle sequences than the monsters of other types, who usually have models that look like something out of an early PS1 [=PS1=] game. The only real detriment they have is all pure dragons ("dragons" of another type like the Twin-Head aren't affected) with a stat over 2100, besides the Kaiser Dragon and Harpie's Pet Dragon, only being compatible with Dragon Treasure and the aforementioned universal equips for their equip compatibility (and in the case of the Meteor Black Dragon, only those three plus Salamandra).
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