History Videogame / TheElderScrollsIIIMorrowind

13th Jun '17 11:03:31 AM Bruxist
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13th Jun '17 7:06:09 AM Koveras
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''Tribunal'': Following an assassination attempt against the PlayerCharacter, you are directed to Morrowind's capital city of Mournhold to investigate. From there, you become embroiled in the power struggle between the Tribunal deity Almalexia and the King of Morrowind, Hlaalu Helseth. [[DifficultySpike It's noticeably more challenging]] than the original game, and intended for mid-to-high level characters. Unlike the rest of the game, you are restricted to only one part of the stated-to-be massive city and the sewers/ruins [[UndergroundLevel beneath it]].

''Bloodmoon'': The expansion adds the island of Solstheim, a grim [[GrimUpNorth frozen tundra]] with a very different atmosphere than the main game. Upon arriving, you find effectively two main quests to complete. The first begins when you sign on to help an [[BadassArmy Imperial Legion]] captain with some odd jobs around his fort. It quickly escalates into a simple-but-dramatic plot about rescuing him from the [[HuntingTheMostDangerousGame Most Dangerous Game]] -- by taking part in it yourself. The second involves helping the new Imperial mining colony of Raven Rock grow from absolutely nothing into a flourishing frontier settlement, with plenty of moral dilemmas along the way.

to:

* ''Tribunal'': Following an assassination attempt against the PlayerCharacter, you are directed to Morrowind's capital city of Mournhold to investigate. From there, you become embroiled in the power struggle between the Tribunal deity Almalexia and the King of Morrowind, Hlaalu Helseth. [[DifficultySpike It's noticeably more challenging]] than the original game, and intended for mid-to-high level characters. Unlike the rest of the game, you are restricted to only one part of the stated-to-be massive city and the sewers/ruins [[UndergroundLevel beneath it]]. \n\n
*
''Bloodmoon'': The expansion adds the island of Solstheim, a grim [[GrimUpNorth frozen tundra]] with a very different atmosphere than the main game. Upon arriving, you find effectively two main quests to complete. The first begins when you sign on to help an [[BadassArmy Imperial Legion]] captain with some odd jobs around his fort. It quickly escalates into a simple-but-dramatic plot about rescuing him from the [[HuntingTheMostDangerousGame Most Dangerous Game]] -- by taking part in it yourself. The second involves helping the new Imperial mining colony of Raven Rock grow from absolutely nothing into a flourishing frontier settlement, with plenty of moral dilemmas along the way.
3rd Apr '17 7:51:45 AM BeerBaron
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''The Elder Scrolls III: Morrowind'' is [[NeverTrustATitle the fifth videogame]] in ''Franchise/TheElderScrolls'' series by Bethesda Softworks, released in 2002. Like the other games in the "core" series (i.e. the ones with numbers in their names), it is a massive, [[WideOpenSandbox free-form]] {{RPG}}.

This was the first ''Elder Scrolls'' game to be released on a console (specifically, the {{Xbox}})--in fact, it was the first major WesternRPG to get a MultiPlatform release in a long while. As such, it also marked a major shift in gameplay and design philosophy. Gone were ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsArena Arena]]'' and ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIDaggerfall Daggerfall]]'''s nigh-infinite, [[RandomlyGeneratedLevels procedurally generated worlds]], replaced with carefully hand-crafted environments that, while smaller than their predecessors, were designed to invoke [[SceneryPorn awe]] and still be far larger than most video games. The combat system is radically different from the rest of the series: while it is still real-time, character stats play a far larger role than player skill compared to the rest of the series. Like the other games, however, ''Morrowind'' puts a huge emphasis on the [[LoadsAndLoadsOfSidequests numerous side quests]], to the degree where they are pretty much the most important aspect of the game, and are neatly tied into the main story.

The story is set 10 years after the events of ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIDaggerfall Daggerfall]]'', on the far eastern frontier of the Tamrielic Empire. The player character is a convict and an [[ParentalAbandonment orphan]] in the Imperial City dungeons. For unknown reasons, TheEmperor Uriel Septim VII personally orders that you be released early on the condition that you be shipped to the backwater province of Morrowind (more specifically, the even more backwater district of Vvardenfell, until very recently closed off to all foreigners on religious grounds) and meet with an agent of his named [[TheSpymaster Caius Cosades]]. However, upon being released, you are perfectly free to say "screw that" and explore Vvardenfell at your own pace. If you choose to accept the mission given to you, however, you are launched into a labyrinthine plot involving an AncientConspiracy, prophecies, lost prophecies, false prophecies, reincarnation, [[PhysicalGod gods]], backroom politics, gang wars, TheCorruption, and lots and lots of walking. Seriously, you spend a good half of the game just walking around. Not that it isn't [[SceneryPorn a pleasant and interesting walk]].

Two expansion packs were later released for PC: ''Tribunal'' has you visit Morrowind Province's capital city of Mournhold to investigate an assassination plot against you. It's noticeably more challenging than the original game, and intended for mid-to-high level characters. Unlike the rest of the game, you are restricted to only one part of the stated-to-be massive city and the sewers/ruins [[UndergroundLevel beneath it]].

The second expansion, ''Bloodmoon'', is set in a [[GrimUpNorth frozen tundra]] with a different atmosphere than the main game, it returns to the WideOpenSandbox formula. There are effectively two main quests to follow in ''Bloodmoon''. The first begins when the player signs on to help an [[BadassArmy Imperial Legion]] captain with some odd jobs around his fort, which expands into a simple-but-dramatic plot about rescuing him from the [[HuntingTheMostDangerousGame Most Dangerous Game]]--by taking part in it yourself. Also, [[OurWerewolvesAreDifferent werewolves are involved]]. The second involves helping the new Imperial mining colony of Raven Rock grow from absolutely nothing into a flourishing frontier settlement, with plenty of moral dilemmas along the way.

In 2003, the GameOfTheYearEdition was released. It includes all of the patches, DLC, and both expansions.

Despite its venerable age, ''Morrowind'' remains a classic and boasts a large player base to this day. It marked the point where [[TheVerse Tamriel]] ceased to be a standard MedievalEuropeanFantasy setting and became a truly unique ConstructedWorld with highly memorable cultures, history, creatures, landscapes, mythopoeia, and characters. As its [[Gush/VideoGamesAToF gushing]] fans will tell you, ''Morrowind'' does imitate the works of Creator/JRRTolkien, but in a much different way than most fantasy worlds do--by putting the same amount of thought and detail into its universe, rather than just borrowing ideas from ''Literature/TheLordOfTheRings.'' And even less-enthused observers have to admit that ''Morrowind'' has probably had the greatest overall influence on the direction of WesternRPG output since ''VideoGame/UltimaIV'' - near-as-dammit every WRPG since has been influenced by ''Morrowind'' in some way, and it in turn took a lot from ''[=U4=]'' (and not just in game mechanics, either).

to:

''The Elder Scrolls III: Morrowind'' is [[NeverTrustATitle the fifth videogame]] in ''Franchise/TheElderScrolls'' series by [[{{Creator/Bethesda}} Bethesda Softworks, Softworks]], released in 2002. Like the other games in the "core" series (i.e. the ones with numbers in their names), it is a massive, [[WideOpenSandbox free-form]] {{RPG}}.

This ''Morrowind'' was the first ''Elder Scrolls'' game to be released on a console (specifically, the {{Xbox}})--in {{Xbox}}) -- in fact, it was the first major WesternRPG to get a MultiPlatform release in a long while. As such, it also marked a major shift in gameplay game play and design philosophy. Gone were ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsArena Arena]]'' and ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIDaggerfall Daggerfall]]'''s nigh-infinite, [[RandomlyGeneratedLevels nigh-infinite]], [[ProceduralGeneration procedurally generated worlds]], replaced with carefully hand-crafted environments that, while smaller than their predecessors, were designed to invoke [[SceneryPorn awe]] and still be far larger than most video games. The combat system is radically different from the rest of the series: while it is still real-time, character stats play a far larger role than player skill compared to the rest of the series. Like the other games, however, ''Morrowind'' puts a huge emphasis on the [[LoadsAndLoadsOfSidequests numerous side quests]], to the degree where they are pretty much the most important a major aspect of the game, and are neatly tied into the main story.

The story is set 10 years after the events of ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIDaggerfall Daggerfall]]'', on the far eastern frontier of the Tamrielic Empire. The player character is a convict [[YouAllMeetInACell convict]] and an [[ParentalAbandonment orphan]] in the Imperial City dungeons. For unknown reasons, TheEmperor [[TheEmperor Emperor]] Uriel Septim VII personally orders that you be released early on the condition that you be shipped to the backwater province of Morrowind (more specifically, the even more backwater district of Vvardenfell, until very recently closed off to all foreigners on religious grounds) and meet with an agent of his named [[TheSpymaster Caius Cosades]]. However, upon being released, you are perfectly free to say "screw that" and explore Vvardenfell at your own pace. If you choose to accept the mission given to you, however, you are launched into a labyrinthine plot involving an AncientConspiracy, prophecies, lost prophecies, false prophecies, reincarnation, [[PhysicalGod gods]], backroom politics, gang wars, TheCorruption, and lots and lots of walking. Seriously, you spend a good half of the game just walking around. Not that it isn't [[SceneryPorn a pleasant and interesting walk]].

Two expansion packs were later released for PC: ''Tribunal'' has PC:

''Tribunal'': Following an assassination attempt against the PlayerCharacter,
you visit Morrowind Province's are directed to Morrowind's capital city of Mournhold to investigate an assassination plot against you. investigate. From there, you become embroiled in the power struggle between the Tribunal deity Almalexia and the King of Morrowind, Hlaalu Helseth. [[DifficultySpike It's noticeably more challenging challenging]] than the original game, and intended for mid-to-high level characters. Unlike the rest of the game, you are restricted to only one part of the stated-to-be massive city and the sewers/ruins [[UndergroundLevel beneath it]].

''Bloodmoon'': The second expansion, ''Bloodmoon'', is set in expansion adds the island of Solstheim, a grim [[GrimUpNorth frozen tundra]] with a very different atmosphere than the main game, it returns to the WideOpenSandbox formula. There are game. Upon arriving, you find effectively two main quests to follow in ''Bloodmoon''. complete. The first begins when the player signs you sign on to help an [[BadassArmy Imperial Legion]] captain with some odd jobs around his fort, which expands fort. It quickly escalates into a simple-but-dramatic plot about rescuing him from the [[HuntingTheMostDangerousGame Most Dangerous Game]]--by Game]] -- by taking part in it yourself. Also, [[OurWerewolvesAreDifferent werewolves are involved]].yourself. The second involves helping the new Imperial mining colony of Raven Rock grow from absolutely nothing into a flourishing frontier settlement, with plenty of moral dilemmas along the way.

In 2003, the GameOfTheYearEdition was released.released for both {{XBox}} and PC. It includes all of the patches, DLC, and both expansions.

Despite its venerable age, ''Morrowind'' remains a classic and boasts a large player base to this day. It marked the point where [[TheVerse Tamriel]] ceased to be a standard MedievalEuropeanFantasy setting and became a truly unique ConstructedWorld with highly memorable cultures, history, creatures, landscapes, mythopoeia, and characters. As its [[Gush/VideoGamesAToF gushing]] fans will tell you, ''Morrowind'' does imitate the works of Creator/JRRTolkien, but in a much different way than most fantasy worlds do--by putting the same amount of thought and detail into its universe, rather than just borrowing ideas from ''Literature/TheLordOfTheRings.'' And even less-enthused observers have to admit that ''Morrowind'' has probably had the greatest overall influence on the direction of WesternRPG output since ''VideoGame/UltimaIV'' - near-as-dammit every WRPG since has been influenced by ''Morrowind'' in some way, and it in turn took a lot from ''[=U4=]'' (and not just in game mechanics, either).
''Morrowind''.
2nd Apr '17 7:31:25 AM Koveras
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Despite its venerable age, ''Morrowind'' remains a classic and boasts a large player base to this day. It marked the point where [[TheVerse Tamriel]] ceased to be a standard MedievalEuropeanFantasy setting and became a truly unique ConstructedWorld with highly memorable cultures, history, creatures, landscapes, mythopoeia, and characters. As its {{gushing|AboutShowsYouLike}} fans will tell you, ''Morrowind'' does imitate the works of Creator/JRRTolkien, but in a much different way than most fantasy worlds do--by putting the same amount of thought and detail into its universe, rather than just borrowing ideas from ''Literature/TheLordOfTheRings.'' And even less-enthused observers have to admit that ''Morrowind'' has probably had the greatest overall influence on the direction of WesternRPG output since ''VideoGame/UltimaIV'' - near-as-dammit every WRPG since has been influenced by ''Morrowind'' in some way, and it in turn took a lot from ''[=U4=]'' (and not just in game mechanics, either).

to:

Despite its venerable age, ''Morrowind'' remains a classic and boasts a large player base to this day. It marked the point where [[TheVerse Tamriel]] ceased to be a standard MedievalEuropeanFantasy setting and became a truly unique ConstructedWorld with highly memorable cultures, history, creatures, landscapes, mythopoeia, and characters. As its {{gushing|AboutShowsYouLike}} [[Gush/VideoGamesAToF gushing]] fans will tell you, ''Morrowind'' does imitate the works of Creator/JRRTolkien, but in a much different way than most fantasy worlds do--by putting the same amount of thought and detail into its universe, rather than just borrowing ideas from ''Literature/TheLordOfTheRings.'' And even less-enthused observers have to admit that ''Morrowind'' has probably had the greatest overall influence on the direction of WesternRPG output since ''VideoGame/UltimaIV'' - near-as-dammit every WRPG since has been influenced by ''Morrowind'' in some way, and it in turn took a lot from ''[=U4=]'' (and not just in game mechanics, either).
15th Mar '17 11:39:59 AM BeerBaron
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Added DiffLines:


''Morrowind'' also features a large modding community which continues to churn out [[GameMod Game Mods]] to this day. One of the most prominent is ''VideoGame/TamrielRebuilt'', which seeks to add a lore-accurate representation of the rest of mainland Morrowind to the game's world. (Tropes specific to ''Tamriel Rebuilt'' should go there.)
6th Mar '17 9:52:22 PM Koveras
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The story is set 10 years after the events of ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIDaggerfall Daggerfall]]'', on the far eastern frontier of the Tamrielic Empire. The player character is a convict and an [[ParentalAbandonment orphan]] in the Imperial City dungeons. For unknown reasons, TheEmperor Uriel Septim VII personally orders that you be released early on the condition that you be shipped to the backwater province of Morrowind (more specifically, the even more backwater district of Vvardenfell) and meet with an agent of his named [[TheSpymaster Caius Cosades]]. However, upon being released, you are perfectly free to say "screw that" and explore Vvardenfell at your own pace. If you choose to accept the mission given to you, however, you are launched into a labyrinthine plot involving an AncientConspiracy, prophecies, lost prophecies, false prophecies, reincarnation, [[PhysicalGod gods]], backroom politics, gang wars, TheCorruption, and lots and lots of walking. Seriously, you spend a good half of the game just walking around. Not that it isn't [[SceneryPorn a pleasant and interesting walk]].

to:

The story is set 10 years after the events of ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIIDaggerfall Daggerfall]]'', on the far eastern frontier of the Tamrielic Empire. The player character is a convict and an [[ParentalAbandonment orphan]] in the Imperial City dungeons. For unknown reasons, TheEmperor Uriel Septim VII personally orders that you be released early on the condition that you be shipped to the backwater province of Morrowind (more specifically, the even more backwater district of Vvardenfell) Vvardenfell, until very recently closed off to all foreigners on religious grounds) and meet with an agent of his named [[TheSpymaster Caius Cosades]]. However, upon being released, you are perfectly free to say "screw that" and explore Vvardenfell at your own pace. If you choose to accept the mission given to you, however, you are launched into a labyrinthine plot involving an AncientConspiracy, prophecies, lost prophecies, false prophecies, reincarnation, [[PhysicalGod gods]], backroom politics, gang wars, TheCorruption, and lots and lots of walking. Seriously, you spend a good half of the game just walking around. Not that it isn't [[SceneryPorn a pleasant and interesting walk]].
24th Dec '16 4:44:28 PM boris90
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[[quoteright:277:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/Elder_Scrolls_-_Morrowind_001_535.png]]

to:

[[quoteright:277:http://static.tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pub/images/Elder_Scrolls_-_Morrowind_001_535.org/pmwiki/pub/images/c3c8f91a_22df_4987_9f14_a086de4f283a_13160_00000a32497bf572_tmp.png]]
25th Nov '16 12:47:23 AM Koveras
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Despite its venerable age, ''Morrowind'' remains a classic and boasts a large player base to this day. It marked the point where [[TheVerse Tamriel]] ceased to be a standard MedievalEuropeanFantasy setting and became a truly unique ConstructedWorld with highly memorable cultures, history, creatures, landscapes, mythopoea, and characters. As its {{gushing|AboutShowsYouLike}} fans will tell you, ''Morrowind'' does imitate the works of Creator/JRRTolkien, but in a much different way than most fantasy worlds do--by putting the same amount of thought and detail into its universe, rather than just borrowing ideas from ''Literature/TheLordOfTheRings.'' And even less-enthused observers have to admit that ''Morrowind'' has probably had the greatest overall influence on the direction of WesternRPG output since ''VideoGame/UltimaIV'' - near-as-dammit every WRPG since has been influenced by ''Morrowind'' in some way, and it in turn took a lot from ''[=U4=]'' (and not just in game mechanics, either).

to:

Despite its venerable age, ''Morrowind'' remains a classic and boasts a large player base to this day. It marked the point where [[TheVerse Tamriel]] ceased to be a standard MedievalEuropeanFantasy setting and became a truly unique ConstructedWorld with highly memorable cultures, history, creatures, landscapes, mythopoea, mythopoeia, and characters. As its {{gushing|AboutShowsYouLike}} fans will tell you, ''Morrowind'' does imitate the works of Creator/JRRTolkien, but in a much different way than most fantasy worlds do--by putting the same amount of thought and detail into its universe, rather than just borrowing ideas from ''Literature/TheLordOfTheRings.'' And even less-enthused observers have to admit that ''Morrowind'' has probably had the greatest overall influence on the direction of WesternRPG output since ''VideoGame/UltimaIV'' - near-as-dammit every WRPG since has been influenced by ''Morrowind'' in some way, and it in turn took a lot from ''[=U4=]'' (and not just in game mechanics, either).
19th Jun '16 4:44:34 AM supergod
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Two expansion packs were later released for PC: ''Tribunal'' has you visit Morrowind Province's capital city of Mournhold to investigate an assassination plot against you. It's noticeably more challenging than the original game, and intended for mid-to-high level characters. Unfortunately, it is not a WideOpenSandbox like the rest of the game, as you are restricted to only one part of the stated-to-be massive city and the sewers/ruins [[UndergroundLevel beneath it]]. The new antagonist also turns out to have a very petty excuse for their EvilPlan, while the protagonist [[IdiotPlot has to suffer some strange lapses in judgement]] [[StupidityIsTheOnlyOption in order for the plot to proceed]].

The second expansion, ''Bloodmoon'', is generally considered far better. Set in a [[GrimUpNorth frozen tundra]] with a refreshingly different atmosphere than the main game, it returns to the WideOpenSandbox formula. There are effectively two main quests to follow in ''Bloodmoon''. The first begins when the player signs on to help an [[BadassArmy Imperial Legion]] captain with some odd jobs around his fort, which expands into a simple-but-dramatic plot about rescuing him from the [[HuntingTheMostDangerousGame Most Dangerous Game]]--by taking part in it yourself. Also, [[OurWerewolvesAreDifferent werewolves are involved]]. The second involves helping the new Imperial mining colony of Raven Rock grow from absolutely nothing into a flourishing frontier settlement, with plenty of somewhat interesting moral dilemmas along the way.

to:

Two expansion packs were later released for PC: ''Tribunal'' has you visit Morrowind Province's capital city of Mournhold to investigate an assassination plot against you. It's noticeably more challenging than the original game, and intended for mid-to-high level characters. Unfortunately, it is not a WideOpenSandbox like Unlike the rest of the game, as you are restricted to only one part of the stated-to-be massive city and the sewers/ruins [[UndergroundLevel beneath it]]. The new antagonist also turns out to have a very petty excuse for their EvilPlan, while the protagonist [[IdiotPlot has to suffer some strange lapses in judgement]] [[StupidityIsTheOnlyOption in order for the plot to proceed]].

it]].

The second expansion, ''Bloodmoon'', is generally considered far better. Set set in a [[GrimUpNorth frozen tundra]] with a refreshingly different atmosphere than the main game, it returns to the WideOpenSandbox formula. There are effectively two main quests to follow in ''Bloodmoon''. The first begins when the player signs on to help an [[BadassArmy Imperial Legion]] captain with some odd jobs around his fort, which expands into a simple-but-dramatic plot about rescuing him from the [[HuntingTheMostDangerousGame Most Dangerous Game]]--by taking part in it yourself. Also, [[OurWerewolvesAreDifferent werewolves are involved]]. The second involves helping the new Imperial mining colony of Raven Rock grow from absolutely nothing into a flourishing frontier settlement, with plenty of somewhat interesting moral dilemmas along the way.
29th Apr '16 11:15:39 AM BeerBaron
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[[foldercontrol]]

[[folder: S-Z]]
* SanitySlippage:
** The Sleepers start out babbling about Dagoth Ur's return and the rise of the Sixth House. After a certain point in the main quest, they turn hostile and start attacking the player.
** Dagoth Ur and the Tribunal all suffer from sanity slippage to varying degrees as a side-effect of becoming Gods through the power of the Heart of Lorkhan. Dagoth Ur has it the worst, since he was far less restrained in his consumption of the heart's power. Of the Tribunal, only Almalexia exhibits any obvious signs of insanity, though it is implied that Vivec and Sotha Sil would have eventually suffered the same fate.
* {{Satan}}: The Tribunal Temple and the Ashlanders treat Dagoth Ur as this. The truth is a bit [[HiddenDepths more complex]].
* SavageSetpiece: Netch are a species of [[LivingGasbag Flying Jellyfish]] native to Morrowind and are farmed for their leathery skin by the natives. Whether wild or farmed, they won't attack you unless provoked. However, both the large, poisonous male and the smaller, more physical female can easily dispatch a low level player.
* ScareChord: The ambient background music will change from "exploration" themes to a random "battle" theme once the wandering player is attacked. The exploration themes are typically quite and soothing while various battle themes will start with a loud drumbeat or trumpet blast. This can be quite surprising and startling when the player is already fairly tense, or concentrated on something else.
* ScaryImpracticalArmor: Played with. Mostly only the native styles (Glass, Bonemold, Dreugh, Indoril) play it straight, as each possess [[SpikesOfVillainy spikes]] and [[ShouldersOfDoom oversized shoulders]]. Trollbone armour also counts, while it is Nordic style – essentially, it’s just a pile of troll bones sewed to cloth underarmour and a troll skull atop. Local Chitin and Netch leather armour, on the other hand, may look somewhat menacing, but fairly practical, given the materials they made and that they are suited to harsh island environment. Western (i. e. Imperial) armours looks very much like real life plate armour examples; same to local Ebony armour. Even Daedric armour, while featuring extremely scary facemasks, don’t have common “impractical” features like in [[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsIVOblivion subsequent]] [[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsVSkyrim games]] exaggerated.
* SceneryPorn: For it's time, the landscape scenery was amongst the best ever seen in game of this scale.
* SchmuckBait: I'm sure nothing bad will happen if you take those precious gemstones or stacks of gold sitting on at the foot of that Daedric statue...
* SchrodingersQuestion: During character creation, you will be asked to select your race. Once you've chosen, the camera angle will immediately jump "average" height to match the height of your new race.
* ScrewDestiny: You can claim this when speaking to Dagoth Ur at the end of the game. It's actually quite possibly the reality of the situation too, with you not truly being the ChosenOne, but instead a convenient pawn of Azura and the Emperor. No definitive answer is ever given, meaning we'll probably never know for sure.
* ScrewTheRulesIHaveMoney: You can go on a murderous rampage, then just walk away by paying a fine. Then go on another murderous rampage, pay the fine, then take a nap in the streets, pay the fine.... You just have to be careful to keep your bounty from exceeding 5000 gold. At that point, you'll be marked as "kill on sight" by all guards in the game. The only way out of it at that point is to pay the Thieves Guild to have your bounty erased.
* ScrewTheRulesIHaveSupernaturalPowers: This is the outlook of the [[EvilSorcerer Telvanni]]. They strongly believe in MightMakesRight and KlingonPromotion is a legitimate means of advancement within the house (which is your "in" to rise to the top of the as an otherwise hated outlander.) The Telvanni tend strongly toward magical might, and only care about the various Temple and Imperial laws and bans on certain kinds of magic insofar as those laws and bans can be enforced.
* ScrewYourself: Divayth Fyr enjoys the company of his [[OppositeSexClone "wives"]] very much.
** He actually refers to them as his [[IncestIsRelative "daughters"]].
* SealedEvilInACan: Several examples.
** [[BigBad Dagoth]] [[PhysicalGod Ur]] and his minions have been sealed within Red Mountain by the Tribunal-powered Ghostfence. However, as the power of the Tribunal has waned [[spoiler: due to being unable to replenish their divinity since Dagoth Ur's reemergence]], Dagoth Ur's influence has begun to spread outside of the Ghostfence, making this into a LeakingCanOfEvil.
** The Dremora Lord Dregas Volar, wielder of the last Daedric Crescent Blade, has been sealed inside of Magas Volar, a Daedric shrine [[SealedRoomInTheMiddleOfNowhere not physically connected to the outside world]] and only accessible with a magic amulet.
* SeeWater: Seeing for any distance while underwater is actually quite difficult. However, there is a bug where if you swim at ''just'' the right level slightly below the surface, you can see through the water as easily as you can through air.
* SelectiveEnforcement: If you break any law, the guards will be on you in no time flat. However, they won't lift a finger to help you with that assassin trying to kill you.
* SelectiveGravity: It is possible to make a stack of items, then remove the items on the bottom of the stack to leave the top items floating in midair.
* SelfMadeMan: [[spoiler: At the end of the main quest, Dagoth Ur asks if you think you are actually the reincarnation of Nerevar. If you reply that you are not, but you will still destroy him, he will mildly praise you for your boldness. His responses to your other reply options are more neutral or negative.]]
** As Vivec would say of gods and heroes of legends: "walk like them until they walk like you". Meaning it doesn't matter whether you really are the ChosenOne. If you manage to do what the ChosenOne was supposed to do, then you ''are'' the ChosenOne for all practical purposes. This is actually an action called Mantling, and is one of the few (if only) times the main character is expected to do it.
* SemiDivine: Those inflicted with the Corprus Disease. They have a touch of the divine (channeled from Lorkhan's Heart by Dagoth Ur), given as... not exactly a ''[[BodyHorror boon]]'', but is seen as such by the gifter and his cultists. [[spoiler: The Nerevarine gets infected in the course of the main quest, but then gets cured of the downsides]].
* SequenceBreaking: Given the wide-open nature of the game, it is possible to acquire items meant to be acquired very late in the main quest whenever you want. For example, one can acquire the late-game artifacts [[MacGuffin Keening and Sunder]] before even finishing the first few missions of the game. (Actually ''using'' them that early is another story without exploits.)
* ShiningCity: Mournhold. Expressly called "city of light" by its denizens. Doubles as capital city of the province of Morrowind.
* ShootTheBullet: It is possible to use projectile weapons (Arrows, Crossbow Bolts, etc.) to hit magical projectiles (like fireballs and lightning bolts) in midair.
* ShopliftAndDie: Being seen while picking up any item in a shop, even near-worthless VendorTrash, will lead to the shopkeeper (and any guards present) attacking you. It doesn't help that items will often be on the counter just in front of or on shelves just behind the shopkeeper, meaning an accidental bump of the mouse or analog stick will have you stealing something when all you were trying to do was talk to the shopkeeper. Ramped UpToEleven in the ''Tribunal'' expansion, which was designed for high-level players in mind, where shopkeepers can be level 30 or higher and easily capable of killing a low-level player.
* ShoutOut: A multitude, from blatant EasterEgg ones to GeniusBonus ones tucked away in a book somewhere.
** At least one of the developers seems to have '''really''' liked {{Pokemon}}. Weepingbell Hall, Marowak's Spine, Peke Utchoo, et cetera.
** One of the developers went to Duke, so he being a big fan of Duke basketball, there is an easter egg sword [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Elton_Brand Eltonbrand]] that you get by retrieving [[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mike_Krzyzewski Shashev's Key]] (among other requirements). Elsewhere in the game, you come across a (likely dead) enchanter who [[Film/SpaceJam believed he could fly]] named "[[http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/North_Carolina_Tar_Heels Tarhiel]]".
** The very name "Morrowind" could be a reference to ''[[Literature/TheHeritageOfShannara The Elf Queen of Shannara]]'', which featured the island of Morrowindl, which also had an active volcano being held in check by magic.
** In Omalen Ancestral tomb, the corpse of an adventurer can be found crushed under a rock due to a cave in. There's a scroll that records his last thoughts, [[Franchise/IndianaJones signed "Indie"]]. It also mentions that his father made jokes about his childhood pet.
** The Bjorn ice cave on Solstheim has a skeletal corpse with his feet stuck to the ceiling and a sword just out of his reach down below. He apparently didn't [[TheEmpireStrikesBack use the force.]]
** Two sections of the Temple canton in Vivec City are called the [[WesterAnimation/SuperFriends Hall of Justice]] and the [[WesternAnimation/HeManAndTheMastersOfTheUniverse Hall of Wisdom]].
* SideQuest: Tons and tons of them, as per ''Elder Scrolls'' series tradition.
* SideQuestSideStory: The quest lines for each guild and faction have their own stories, some nearly as expansive as the main quest itself.
* SickeningCrunch: When you take fall damage.
* SignificantBirthDate: The player character's birth date makes them eligible for the Nerevarine Prophecy, however, it's Subverted as the actual date is never revealed.
--> "...born on a certain day, to uncertain parents..."
* SimultaneousWarningAndAction: Averted by guards if you have a bounty. Even ''killing a guard'' won't get you immediately murdered by his fellow officers: you still had the choice of jail, a fine, or resisting arrest.
* TheSingularity - The GameBreaker described under YMMV, in which you use the boosts from the intelligence-enhancing potions you make in order to create better and better intelligence-enhancing potions, until you become intelligent enough to craft items that will make you invulnerable and let you kill anything in the game in one hit, essentially turns the player character into a one-man Singularity.
* SkeletonGovernment: Largely averted, as glimpses into the inner workings of the Imperial governance and Dunmer Great Houses are frequent. For example, you fill in your class and race information at a tax office, you need a "passport" scroll to enter Sadrith Mora, and number of quests revolve around such mundane acts of government as tax collection and diplomatic banquets.
* SkeletonKey: A lockpick with a 100% success rate. You get it for completing the Thieves Guild quest line, however, by that time, you're likely a skilled enough lockpicker to not even need it.
* SkeletonsInTheCoatCloset: Bonemold and Trollbone armors both fit.
* SketchySuccessor: King Hlaalu Helseth. To begin with, the Dunmer people see the role as "King of Morrowind" as an Imperial convention they have no need for, as they see their true rulers as the Tribunal Temple and the Great Houses. Helseth himself is rumored to be a MasterPoisoner who isn't above using the Dark Brotherhood to eliminate perceived threats. His predecessor as King and that King's chosen heir both died under mysterious circumstances, with Helseth believed to have been involved. [[spoiler: He also ends up being the last King of Morrowind, though not due to any political blunders. (Helseth appears to have been rather competent, and well on his way to transforming the role of King of Morrowind into a position with actual power at his last mention), but because of the Red Year; the post-Red Year Morrowind appears to be an aristocratic republic ruled by a council of the Great Houses (much like the situation prior to the Imperial takeover, although with the theocratic elements toned down)]].
* SkirtOverSlacks: An option for dressing yourself. Some [=NPCs=] can also be seen dressed this way. It can be advantageous if the pants and skirt are enchanted, allowing you to have access to both enchantments at once. (And then a robe can be worn over top of both, taking it even further.)
* SlaveCollar: Comes in the form of a locked, heavy bracer with a drain Magicka enchantment.
* SlaveLiberation: If you can find the key to their bracers, you can liberate any slaves you come across. (Some do not have a key for their bracers, but if they are taken to a location for which you do have the key by using a Command spell, you can still free them.) The Twin Lamps is an organization (led by the daughter of the Duke of Vvardenfell) dedicated to freeing slaves and returning them to their homelands.
* SlaveryIsASpecialKindOfEvil: Played with, as slavery is a part of everyday life in Morrowind. When they became a VoluntaryVassal to the Empire, they were granted an exemption to the Imperial ban on slavery, however, Imperial influence has been reducing its popularity over time. The Twin Lamps formed as an organization to free slaves and return them to their homelands.
* SliceAndDiceSwordsmanship: Averted, as the game gives different values to weapons for Slashing, Hacking, and Thrusting damage. For example, a spear has high Thrust damage but low Slash and Hack damage but a claymore has high Slash damage, mediocre Hack damage, and low Thrust damage, while an axe has high Hack damage, mediocre Slash damage, and low Thrust damage. The method of attack you use depends on how you are moving when you strike, although you can turn this off in the Settings in order to always use the weapon's most damaging style of attack.
* SlidingScaleOfSillinessVersusSeriousness: Comes down farthest on the "Seriousness" side of the scale out of the main series games to date.
* SmugSnake: Orvas Dren, the leader of the Cammona Tong.
* SnipeHunt: Once you've joined the Mages Guild, Archmage Tribonius will give you a quest to discover what caused the disappearance of the Dwemer. This is a mystery roughly 4000 years in the making and no one, not even the local ''deities'', have any idea what happened to them. [[spoiler: By finding the right items and talking to the right people, you can come up with a very plausible theory. He seems surprised when you tell him about it, and you get a Reputation point for figuring it out.]]
* SoftWater: You can survive falling from a great height into a body of water without injury, as long as the water is deep enough. Interestingly, if you have a spell of Water Walking enabled, the water will behave just like land...
* SoleEntertainmentOption: No wonder everybody in the world has time to stand around and talk to you! Aside from a (usually unoccupied) gladiatorial arena in Vivec, an 'exotic dancing' club in Suran, and an outdoor theater in Mournhold, there's nothing to do!
* SongsInTheKeyOfLock: One quest in ''Bloodmoon'' requires you to listen to a set of geysers from some stalactites and then activate the stalactites in the same order.
* SortingAlgorithmOfThreateningGeography: You start on an ordinary-looking seashore, and travel to your first city through unthreatening countryside. During the course of your adventure, you visit deserts of volcanic ash, jagged rocky shores, labyrinthine lava scathes and reach the climax of the story in a sprawling ruin built over an open volcanic crater. The Bloodmoon expansion works similarly, starting you off in a chilly-looking but generally green pine forest, passing through harsher and harsher arctic-looking climes, and culminating in and under a giant snowstorm-lashed castle atop a massive glacier.
* SortingAlgorithmOfWeaponEffectiveness: Generally averted. Items outside of containers are hand placed, and never change regardless of your level. Because of this, it is possible to acquire some of the best equipment in the game through simple theft. Items within containers play it straight to a degree, as the items they may contain come from random "leveled lists". Certain items only appear once you reach a certain level, with your Luck attribute also coming into play. (Higher Luck will result in you potentially finding higher leveled items than you normally would.)
* SoulJar: The Heart of Lorkhan acts as one to Dagoth Ur and the Tribunal, as it is the source from which they draw their divine powers. Unbinding it outright destroys Dagoth Ur, while the Tribunal are able to persist with a trace of their divinity in-tact due, according to Vivec, to the faith of their followers.
* SoundOfNoDamage: The sound of a "woosh" of air represents a missed melee attack. A higher-pitched "whurr" sound is used when a spell fails.
* SpaceCompression: It is the smallest game in the main series to date, so this is in full effect. Stated-to-be-massive cities contain only a few dozen [=NPCs=] at most, while many of the smaller settlements have populations in the low teens. However, it traded away the massive size of ''Arena'' and ''Daggerfall'' for a far greater content density, with the entire world being hand-build as opposed to relying on random generation like the previous games. There is also an in-universe justification: you only visit a ''region'' of Morrowind called Vvardenfell, which was only recently settled by the rest of Tamriel, and most of the population was sparse and consisted of the native Ashlanders and the worshippers of the Tribunal and Great Houses.
* SpannerInTheWorks: The player acts as one in most Guilds and factions, most notably in the struggle between the Cammona Tong and the Thieves Guild.
* SpearCarrier: The prisoner Jiub only managed to deliver ten short lines of dialog before you were separated from him at the beginning of the game. Still, he proved popular enough with the fan base that numerous mods were created centering around him. Come ''Oblivion'', Bethesda even got in on the act by making him a Saint who drove the Cliff Racers to extinction.
* SpectralWeaponCopy[=/=]SpontaneousWeaponCreation: The various "Bound Weapon" spells under the school of Conjuration allow copies of Daedric weapons, the best non-artifact class of weapons in the game, to be summoned and used for a set duration.
* SpellCrafting: Custom spell creation is an option at a number of magical merchants. The player chooses a spell's range (self, touch, or ranged), area of effect (single-target or Splash Damage), duration, and effects, then the game automatically assigns a Magicka cost depending on how powerful the spell is, theoretically maintaining game balance. In practice, it is hilariously easy to design game-breakingly powerful spells by combining synergistic effects such as Weakness to Fire + Fire Damage, or assigning a one-second duration to spells that increase the Persuasion skill (which only works in dialogue, which pauses the game clock).
* SpellMyNameWithAThe: ''The'' Nerevarine.
* SpiderLimbs: Yagrum Bagarn, [[spoiler: the last living Dwemer]], has become so bloated and deformed due to the Corprus Disease that he gets around on a machine that combines this trope with SuperWheelchair.
* SpiderTank: Dwemer Spider Centurions are a FunSize version found in Dwemer ruins.
* SprintMeter: The Fatigue meter functions partly as this. Running and jumping cause it to drain rapidly, though it will replenish over time if you stand still. A low fatigue makes melee attacks more likely to miss and makes casting spells more likely to fail.
* TheSpymaster: Caius Cosades. It's even his official title within the Blades organization.
* SquishyWizard: Played straight for Mage-type classes, especially early in the game. Most guides advise you to make Endurance one of your favored attributes during character creation, even if you're planning to be a magic user, to help avert this.
* StandardStatusEffects:
** Poison/Plague - Poison is a standard variety of magic spell, which slowly drains your health for the duration of the spell. Notably, it does not affect most undead or mechanical enemies. Diseases (Common and Blight) both fall under the "Plague" category, and reduce your Attributes until they are cured.
** Paralysis - A standard magic spell which freezes you in place for the spell's duration. This is helpful early in the game, particularly as a weapon enchantment, because very few low-level enemies have resistance to it. [[UselessUsefulSpell Most high-level enemies resist it, however]].
** Silence - Takes the form of the "Sound" spell. Instead of silencing the target, it instead "distracts" the target, making spell casting more likely to fail.
** Blindness - A standard spell which darkens the screen by a percentage, based on the spell's strength. [[UselessUsefulSpell Notably, it has no effect on NPC targets]].
** Charm - Takes the form of various non-combat spells which increase the Disposition of NPC characters toward you.
** Slow - There are various spells which temporarily drop your Speed and Agility attributes, making you slower and less able to dodge attacks.
** Fear - Takes the form of spells which cause enemies to flee rather than fight. The strength of the spell increases the level of enemies who you can make flee.
* StarterEquipment: ''Morrowind'' is pretty stingy in this regard, giving you only the common clothes on your back and allowing you to pick up an iron dagger and apprentice lockpick during character generation. This is all you'll get for free to start out. Anything else will need to be bought or found out in the world.
* StatGrinding: Skill increases only occur after a ''successful'' use of that skill. This can make grinding a long process without the use of in-game training (which is unlimited as long as you can afford it) or exploits (Alchemy, Drain Skill and train, etc.)
* SteamPunk: The Dwemer were a steam punk society, mixed with some {{Magitek}} as they were master enchanters. Their creations can still be seen all over Vvardenfell, but it is mostly LostTechnology now as they've been gone for thousands of years.
* StillWearingTheOldColors: An Imperial Legion quest has you hunting down a deserter who is now in the employ of a witch. Said deserter is still wearing his Legion armor when you find him.
* StoneWall: The in-game book "The Death Blow of Abernanit" is a Block skill book and tells the story of a warrior so skilled with a shield that no attack could reach him.
* StoryBreadcrumbs: The story drops you smack dab in the middle of the final chapter of the four millenia-old drama revolving around the Heart of Lorkhan and the [[PhysicalGod Living Gods]] of the Tribunal. While it is not necessary to do so in order to complete the main quest, you'll need to do your own research using in-game books and exhausting every conversation option with numerous characters in order to learn about the previous chapters.
* StrawFan: M'aiq the Liar [[LegacyCharacter debuts here]], dispensing various [[TakeThat Take Thats]] at other games, the fans who complain about elements which were not included in the game, and even the Developers themselves.
* StupidityIsTheOnlyOption: Pretty much the entire main quest of ''Tribunal'', particularly the part where you must [[spoiler: create ashstorms in Mournhold for Almalexia]].
* SuicidalOverconfidence: ''ALL'' followers and escorts. That withered old pilgrim who begged you to escort her to a shrine won't hesitate to charge a ''giant atronach made of fire'' with fists swinging.
* SummonMagic: Falls under the "Conjuration" school of magic and has two forms. One is to summon a create from elsewhere (like a plane of Oblivion) and have it appear in front of you, under your control, for a fixed duration of time. The second is to summon an object, like a weapon or piece of armor, that you can then use and equip for a fixed duration of time.
* SuperheroTrophyShelf: Inevitably, you'll pile up more artifacts, legendary weapons, and general questing treasures than you can actually use. Whether you build a stronghold or just take over a place to call home, you can easily display them there. Several mods exist specifically to aid in this process, such as being able to hang items on walls or rotate them stand up/lay in different directions.
* SuperPersistentPredator: It is possible to lose most enemies in the game after they've been aggro'd, typically by using the terrain to your advantage. However, Cliff Racers, with their ability to fly, are very difficult to lose.
* SureLetsGoWithThat: Any dealings you have with Mistress Therana. The other Telvanni councilors note that "she hasn't aged well," and getting anything out of her requires you to play along with whatever insane story she is telling at the moment.
* SurpassedTheTeacher: Once you've surpassed the skill level of a NPC offering training services in that skill, they will tell you that there is nothing more they can teach you in that skill.
* SwampsAreEvil: The Bitter Coast is a swampy quagmire dotted with smuggler dens and bandit caves.
* SwordAlmighty: There are two options clearly designed to be the game's top weapons, both swords: the one-handed EasterEgg upgrade for Goldbrand called Eltonbrand, and the two-handed "Paladin's Blade" Chrysamere. In practice, however, there are other weapons which can surpass those two (such as Sunder or the Black Hands Dagger) due to their enchantments, faster attacking speed, etc.
* SwordOfDamocles: Vivec invokes this. In the distant past, [[MadGod Sheogorath]] hurled a rogue moon at Vivec's newly build {{Egopolis}}. Vivec froze it in place above the city, saving the city, but now uses the moon as one of these. He told his followers that the moon is held in place by their love for him, and if they should ever stop loving him, it would fall. [[spoiler: Due in no small part to the player's actions in this game, Vivec disappears early in the 4th era. After some futile attempts to keep the moon in place fail, it falls, with [[EarthShatteringKaboom province-wrecking results]].]]
* SwordOfPlotAdvancement:
** The main quest tasks you with acquiring the Tools of Kagrenac, which are in actuality the blunt-weapon hammer Sunder and the dagger Keening. [[spoiler: In a twist, you don't need to use them on Dagoth Ur himself to win. You must strike the Heart of Lorkhand, source of his (and the Tribunal's) power with the tools]].
** Towards the end of the Imperial Legion questline, you'll be tasked with finding the "Paladin's Blade" Chrysamere. It's the most powerful two-handed sword in the game.
** ''Tribunal'' has you reforge True Flame, the FlamingSword of the original Nerevar, as part of the main quest. It's actually a high quality weapon, and is even more useful in ''Bloodmoon'' thanks to it's fire enchantment taking down the many fire-weak enemies there.
* TheSyndicate: The Camonna Tong.
* TacticalDoorUse: Enemies cannot travel through doors between cells, so it is a perfectly reasonable strategy to flee through doors to regroup and recover. Enemies can, however, travel through standard doors which do not lead to new cells. This can still be solved with the use of a Lock spell.
* TakeAThirdOption: The [[http://www.uesp.net/wiki/Morrowind:Yagrum_Bagarn_and_Wraithguard "Backpath" method]] to beating the main quest allows you to get around many time consuming quests and allows you to take out both sides of the BlackAndGrayMorality main quest. [[BraggingRightsReward (It is very, very difficult to pull off.)]]
** If the player feels bold enough, it is possible to beat the game without using either the 'Backpath' or the main method, provided that their character has accumulated enough health and/or regeneration to ignore the large amounts of health they'll be haemorrhaging from [[spoiler: using Sunder and Keening without first equipping the Wraithguard.]] Needless to say, [[SelfImposedChallenge this way is even more difficult]], but cements the player character as pretty much the biggest BadassNormal ever.
* TakeThatAudience / TakeThatUs: [[EasterEgg M'aiq the Liar]] can be found on a remote island and his conversation options include several examples of each trope.
* TalkativeLoon: Mistress Therena, a councilor of House Telvanni, has "not aged well" according to her associates. She's prone to long, rambling, incoherent rants about random stuff from her early years. This can be entertaining, unless you need to get something out of her. (Such as her quest reward of Daedric equipment or [[spoiler: her vote to make you Telvanni Hortator during the main quest]].
* TalkToEveryone: Even recommended within the game itself by numerous [=NPCs=]. It's the best way to uncover quests, get helpful advice, and get information to fill in the deep {{Backstory}}.
* TeaserEquipment: Many shops have a piece or two of late-game level equipment no matter how early you visit them, but you'll almost certainly be unable to afford it at that point. Two good examples in Balmora, likely the second town you'll visit if following the main quest, are Ra'Virr's Demon/Devil weapons (steel weapons enchanted to allow you to temporarily summon much better Daedric weapons) and Meldor's Dreugh Cuirass and Shield (extremely good medium armor.)
* TechnicallyLivingZombie: Corprus victims are still living and, in-fact, are TheAgeless and have IdealIllnessImmunity. As the disease progresses, their [[BodyHorror bodies mutate]] and their mental faculties devolve to animalistic levels, driven to attack those who are not afflicted with the disease. [[spoiler: The Nerevarine is technically one of these, as they still have the disease but get the negative effects cured]].
* TentativeLight: Many of the game's dungeons are dark enough that a light source is required. The torches and lanterns you can use have a finite duration. Spells such as Light and Night Eye are available, but are also temporary unless you enchant them onto an item as a constant effect.
* TeleportInterdiction: [[BigBad Dagoth Ur]] uses teleport jamming to stop you from teleporting away from his hall.[[spoiler: Azura]] will also prevent you from teleporting out after [[spoiler: destroying the heart]] until you have a conversation with her. She will use it again after [[spoiler: defeating Almalexia]], forcing you back to Mournhold if you try to use [[spoiler: the Mazed Band]] to go anywhere else.
* TimedMission: The "Race Against the Clock" quest for the East Empire Company in ''Bloodmoon.''
* TimmyInAWell: In ''Bloodmoon'', Lassnr will give you a quest to rescue Tymvaul, who fell down a well.
* TinyGuyHugeGirl: The Bosmer. Males are the shortest people in the game, while females are close to the average height of all races.
* TooAwesomeToUse:
** The Ebony Arrows of Slaying. You can find exactly 5 in a tree stump on Solstheim. They hit for about 5000 damage a pop, enough to kill any opponent in the game (not protected by a reflect spell) many times over.
** The SkeletonKey is a lockpick that will never fail, but only has 50 "uses" before it will be gone. And by the time you get it, your security skill is likely high enough that you don't really need it anyway.
** The scrolls of Icarian Flight can be incredibly useful if used properly, but there are only three of them and no way to get more.
* TrailOfBreadCrumbs: A priest named Jocien Ancois, who was kidnapped by Ashlanders, tore out the pages of his history book, and left a trail for any potential rescuer to follow. Naturally, the PlayerCharacter has to be that rescuer.
* TreasureChestCavity: "Rabinna's Inner Beauty", with Rabinna carrying Moon Sugar inside of her.
* TrespassingHero: You're free to enter just about any house or building you can get into. The only way to get in trouble for it is if you are seen by a guard picking the lock. There are also a few "forbidden" areas which, if you enter before you are supposed to as part of a quest, you will be told to leave. (Vivec's palace is one such example.)
* {{Tuckerization}}: You can find the ashes of two members of the official forums who died before the game shipped. Also, one of the very first characters you meet in the game - the one that helps you choose your class and birthsign and gives you the papers to deliver - is named Socucius Ergalla, which is a screen name that the Lead Designer of the game used online, and the [[http://uesp.net/wiki/Morrowind:Socucius_Ergalla character]] also looks considerably like [[http://uesp.net/wiki/General:Ken_Rolston him]].
* UndergroundCity: The Dwemer were fond of building these, and their ruins are still standing thousands of years after their disappearance. Some of the larger Daedric ruins with underground portions may also qualify.
* UniqueEnemy: Several. Old Blue Fin (a unique, named Slaughterfish,) [[ExactlyWhatItSaysOnThetin a Giant Bull Netch]], The White Guar (and several named pack guars,) The Dreugh Warlord, several named Daedra, several named skeletons and ghosts. Some are important to a plot, but not all.
* TheUnreveal: What happened to the Dwemer? Who killed Nerevar? Despite speaking with three of the people who were there for the actual events and one who understood a great deal about the first, it's still unclear.
* UnusualEuphemism: "Filthy s'wit!" "Die, fetcher!" "You n'wah!"
* UnwinnableByDesign: Since all [=NPCs=] are mortal, it is entirely possible to kill someone critical to the main plot and thereby prevent you from completing it. The game is decent enough to tell you when you do this so that you can reload a saved game. There is also a "back door" method of defeating the BigBad that requires only one living NPC, but it skips the entire story and is [[GuideDangIt pretty well hidden]]. However, this NPC can die as well. This is also true for other major plotlines, such as those for the Guilds and Factions you can join. (However, you will get no such message there.)
* UnwinnableByMistake: There are technically three ways to beat the main quest of the game. In addition to the two mentioned above, there is a third using the Alchemy exploit to make your character god like and capable of [[spoiler: using the Tools of Kagrenac on the Heart of Lorkhan without the Wraithguard, which will instantly kill any player who doesn't have thousands of constantly regeneration health points]]. However, in all three methods, the tools Keening and Sunder are required to beat the game. If you misplace them, say but placing them on a corpse that then disappears, you can make the game truly unwinnable.
* UnwittingPawn: [[spoiler:Dagoth Ur. You too, depending on your interpretation of Azura's intentions. You again in Tribunal, but the king is asking for you to go along with it.]]
* UrbanSegregation: Most of the game's larger cities have this going on. It's subtle in places like Balmora and Ald-Ruhn, but more clear in Vivec's cantons. (Plaza > Waistworks > Canalworks > Sewers) In fact, in Vivec, outlanders are typically restricted to the Foreign Quarter only.
* UselessUsefulSpell:
** Spells that cure paralysis on self. Sounds like it might come in handy, right? Too bad you can't cast spells when you're paralyzed. (However, buying any spell allows you to use it as an enchant effect, thus allowing you to create clothing that cures paralysis on equip.)
** The Blind spell, when used against the player, darkens the screen by a percentage based on the strength of the spell for the spell's duration. The spell does nothing when used against [=NPCs=], however.
* UtilityMagic: Many of the Alteration class of spells. Levitation, opening locks, increasing the amount of weight you can carry, etc. The teleportation spells offered by the school of Mysticism also have some extremely utilitarian uses. (Zapping out of danger, allowing you to move while over-encumbered, etc.)
* ViolationOfCommonSense: One Tribunal Temple quest requires that you ''drown yourself.'' (You'll be just fine, however, as it was a test of faith.)
* TheVirus: Corprus Disease (which will either turn you into an EldritchAbomination or a zombie depending on your personality), the Blight (which kills plants, drives animals insane, causes health problems in humanoids, and can carry corprus), as well as some more mundane illnesses ("Swamp Fever," "Jitters," et cetera).
* VoluntaryVassal: A plot important part of the backstory occurred when Vivec (having recently lost two of the tools Kagrenac to Dagoth Ur and thus, the ability for the Tribunal to recharge their divinity,) negotiated this status with Tiber Septim when Septim's forces threatened to invade. Vivec also offered the Numidium in trade, allowing Morrowind to keep many of its pre-Imperial privileges (including slavery, which was illegal elsewhere in the Empire).
* WakeUpCallBoss: Snowy Granius is a [[MagicKnight battlemage]] who hangs out on the bridge to [[NoobCave Arkngthand]]. He's wearing a heavy armor cuirass, wielding an axe, will likely summon a skeleton when he sees you, and knows several other damaging spells as well. For a player who has stuck to the main quest, this will likely be his or her first real challenge, and may even be the first non-critter the player has fought.
* WalletOfHolding: With all of that MoneyForNothing, most players will quickly amass hundreds of thousands of gold and there is no penalty for carrying it all around with you.
* WarmupBoss: Boss Crito in Arkngthand. He is found at the end of the dungeon for the first quest given as part of the main quest line and is a bit stronger than his Mooks throughout the rest of the dungeon. He even has "Boss" in his name.
* WarpWhistle: The spells "Divine Intervention" and "Almsivi Intervention" will teleport you to the nearest Imperial shrine/Tribunal temple, respectively. The Mark and Recall spells are similar, allowing you to set a "Mark" and then "Recall" to that spot. Useful for traveling long distances when no fast travel is available, getting out of a sticky situation in a hurry, or for transporting more loot than you could carry on foot.
* WasOnceAMan: The Dagoth/Ash creatures.
* WeBuyAnything: Mostly averted, as the majority of shops only buy and sell in one type of product. There are a few general traders and pawnbrokers who will buy and sell in nearly anything, but they often have significantly less gold to barter with.
* WeirdMoon: The twin moons Masser and Secunda, as per series tradition (see AlienSky above for more details.) Also, Baar Dau, a rogue moon hurled by Sheogorath at Vivec city. It was stopped by Vivec above the city, and is kept suspended there by his people's love for him. Eventually, it was hollowed out and converted into the Ministry of Truth.
* WeirdWeather: The island of Vvardenfell is regularly covered in ashstorms, when the wind picks up the soot and dust from the Red Mountain volcano in the middle of the island. However, until the main quest of the game is resolved, the normal ashstorms are replaced with "blightstorms"--ashstorms that additionally infect everyone caught out in the open when they are hit with ThePlague.
* WellIntentionedExtremist: Dagoth Ur just wants to make Morrowind independent from the Empire. The fact that his method of achieving that independence involves spreading a disease that either drives the victim to homicidal madness or [[BodyHorror horrifically mutates them]] throughout the ''entire world'' is acceptable in his mind.
** Although if he had succeeded with his ''ultimate'' goal, [[spoiler: he would have turned the entirety of the universe/multiverse into nothing more than an extension of his own mind]]. The collective inhabitants of reality dodged a bullet there.
* WhenItAllBegan: [[TheRashomon Nerevar's death]] following the Battle of Red Mountain some 4000 years prior to the events of the game. All of the events of the game's main quest (and the Tribunal main quest) can be traced back to that time.
* WhisperingGhosts: These can be heard around the ash pits in Tribunal temples and ancestral tombs.
* WideOpenSandbox: As per ''Franchise/TheElderScrolls'' tradition. It's actually the smallest game in the series in terms of square footage. Makes up for it by being entirely hand built, unlike the other games in the series which rely on many randomly generated portions to fill out the larger area.
* WithThisHerring: Sheogarath's Quest. If you manage to find the shrine of the slightly-mad demigod, he gives you a quest to kill a giant bull-netch (a stingless flying jellyfish the natives use for livestock) with "The Fork Of Horripilation." Okay, you might think to yourself, there's tridents and pitchforks in the game, no big deal. But no, after schlepping all the way to the other side of the island, you find that the Fork is really... a serving fork that does 1-2 damage. So you end up chasing a big, harmless, living zeppelin. With a fork.
* WizardsLiveLonger: All of the Telvanni councilors are implied to be extremely old by way of magic. Special mention Divayth Fyr, who at around age 4000, is said to be one of the oldest non-divine beings in Tamriel.
* WorldDomination: Dagoth Ur seeks it. [[spoiler:Almalexia seeks merely Nation Domination, at least for the moment.]]
* [[spoiler: YouAreTheTranslatedForeignWord: You're the Nerevarine!]]
* YourMom: One of the NPC reactions to a failed taunt is, "No, I believe that was your mother."
* ZipMode: in the form of large insects, boats, and Mage Guild teleporters, to replace fast travel that's been around since ''[[VideoGame/TheElderScrollsArena Arena]]''.
[[/folder]]
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